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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘anthropology

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • 3 Quarks Daily talks about the complexities of gentrification in Brooklyn.
  • A BCer in Toronto wonders where school trustee Harout Manougian stands on the subject of gay-straight alliances.
  • Centauri Dreams discusses the mapping of the weather on WASP-43b.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper discussing the complexities of mapping the non-spherical moons of Mars.
  • Far Outliers looks at the role of ethnic minorities in late 19th century Pacific coast baseball in the US.
  • Language Hat looks at folkloric elements in the Russian Chronicles.
  • Savage Minds celebrates the 13th of October as Indigenous Peoples Day.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the Ukrainian war has radicalized the Russian right.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • blogTO shares photos of Nuit Blanche.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper suggesting that relatively recent presence of glaciers on some high Martian mountain slopes.
  • Eastern Approaches looks at the ethnically riven Latvian election.
  • Far Outliers looks at the grim situation for civil rights in early independent Romania and the problematic democracy of the interwar period.
  • Languages of the World’s Asya Perelstvaig maps the distribution of Ukrainians in modern Russia.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Shenzhen is thriving on the basis of–among other things–mobile phones.
  • Otto Pohl looks at the history of Communism in colonial Ghana.
  • Savage Minds features an anthropologist talking about the specific issues of academic writing.
  • Torontoist and blogTO both talk about things that went well with Nuit Blanche and things that did not go so well.
  • Towleroad observes anti-gay persecution in Indonesia’s westernmost region of Aceh.
  • Transit Toronto notes the disruption to the TTC caused by the closing-off of Yonge-Dundas Square for a hockey festival there.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomy notes odd changing features in one of Titan’s seas.
  • blogTO U>examines the birth of late-night television in Toronto in the 1980s.
  • Centauri Dreams looks again at the finding suggesting much Earth water predates the solar system.
  • Cody Delistraty considers the unusual joys of being placeless.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on the Ukrainian war and notes that China is actively courting other countries to take part in its space stations.
  • The Everyay Sociology Blog considers the import of street food and its authenticity.
  • Geocurrents is skeptical about maps purporting to show state failure.
  • Joe. My. God. describes a flight that was delayed by the refusal of Hasidic Jewish passengers to sit next to women.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the steady decline of Hong Kong’s GDP as a fraction of China’s, suggesting that the territory is becoming dispensable.</li?
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla shares some of the first pictures of Mars taken by India’s Mars Orbiter Mission.
  • pollotenchegg examines the changing shape of Ukraine’s demographic pyramid from 1897 to the present.
  • Torontoist mourns the life of murdered Eritrean-Canadian community activist Nahom Berhane.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy reports on the disturbing rise in the United States of inter-party prejudice.
  • Canadian science-fiction writer Peter Watts describes his visit to St. Petersburg.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the papal nuncio in Kyiv has condemned Russian aggression, observes the unpopularity of Ukrainian refugees in Russia, and observes Crimean Tatar complaints about Russian rule.
  • The Financial Times‘ World blog wonders about the future of one country, two systems as a governing principle in Chinese Hong Kong.

[BLOG] Some Monday linls

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  • blogTO notes the five longest TTC routes in Toronto.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes evidence that objects detected by Kepler are gravitationally bound to their parent stars.
  • The Dragon’s Tales tracks the migrations of raccoons and their kind from North to South America, and notes that Pacific Island nations are hoping to find places they can evacuate their populations to.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the computer of the anti-gay papal nuncio to the Dominican Republic has been found to be filled with child porn, and observes apparent success in treating Ebola with HIV medications.
  • Language Log looks at gendered pronoun usage on Facebook.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes depression.
  • Marginal Revolution links to an article examining the lives of lightning survivors.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at Russian-Ukrainian energy wars and isn’t hopeful for Ukraine.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes war-related mortality patterns in Iraq.
  • Savage Minds notes that anthropologists at the University of Chicago have played a leading role in getting that university to disengage from its Confucius Institute.
  • Torontoist notes how 1971 thinkers thought Toronto could be made more pleasant.
  • Towleroad considers if Britney Spears is a proper gay icon.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests the death of civic nationalism in Russia, notes the refugees in Ukraine displaced from the Donbas, suggests that there is sympathy in Tatarstan from Crimean Tatars, looks at Russian official support for the far right worldwide, and suggests that Eurasianism and Dugin are of falling importance.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Big Picture shares images of Syrian Kurdish refugees flooding into Turkey.
  • blogTO quite likes the new visitor centre at Fort York.
  • James Bow quite liked the Word on the Street festival in the Albertan city of Lethbridge.
  • Crooked Timber suggests that French economist Thomas Piketty, with his writings on inequality, has unusually drawing power.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper proposing new methods for studying the atmospheres of gas giant exoplanets.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that scientists have just now developed a new, more efficient method of photosynthesis.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that, according to the US Census, a half-million people have entered same-sex marriages.
  • Languages of the World’s Asya Perelstvaig considers a particular post-1918 orthography reform of the Russian language.
  • pollotenchegg considers the institutions Crimean Tatars trust, and not.
  • Savage Minds considers the complexities of ethnographic writing.
  • Spacing Toronto’s John Lorinc considers overpolicing in Toronto.
  • Torontoist notes that a copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio will be on display at the University of Toronto.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy is skeptical of the good sense in pretending Islam is not a religion.

[NEWS] Some Monday links

  • Al Jazeera notes the rivalry between the Islamic State and al-Qaeda, observes claims of persecution by evangelical Christians of followers of traditional African religions in Brazil, notes that separatism is unpopular in Scotland’s border regions, considers the problems of a beetle theme park in the penumbra of Japan’s Fukushima, looks at a Palestinian-American model, and considers rap music in Iran.
  • The Atlantic notes how events have vindicated the American Congress’ Barbara Lee, the only person not to vote in favour of granting unlimited war-making powers to the American presiden after 9/11, looks at the existential problems of Yiddish outside of ultra-Orthodox communities, and examines Stephen King’s thinking on how to teach writing.
  • Bloomberg notes the water problems of Detroit, looks at proposals to give Scotland home rule and Euroskepticism among the English, considers claims that Scotland might need huge reserves to back up its currency, notes ways sanctions threaten oil deals with Russian companies, examines Poland’s natural gas issues and those of the rest of central and southeastern Europe, notes Ukraine’s exclusion of Russian companies from a 3G cellular auction, notes the reluctance of Scottish banks to support an independent Scotland, and observes how domestic protectionism in Argentina is boosting Uruguay’s beef exports to Europe.
  • The Bloomberg View argues that it should be possible to cleanly break up even established nation-states, is critical of what Colombia is doing to Venezuelan refugees, argues that the achievements of social insects like acts are irrelevant to more complex beings like us, and suggests Britain has no place to criticize China over Hong Kong.
  • CBC notes the strength of Inuit oral history following the discovery of one of the Franklin Expedition’s ships, notes that the type of cancer that killed Terry Fox is now highly curable, and notes NDP leader Thomas Mulcair’s proposal of a $15 an hour federal minimum wage.
  • The Inter Press Service notes Uzbekistan’s fear of Russia motivating a look for eastern allies and suggests that an anti-discrimination law can worsen the plight of sexual minorities in Georgia.
  • MacLean’s notes that Mexican economic development is good for Canada, looks at Catalonian secessionism, and suggests that a new EI tax credit won’t help Canadian business boost employment.
  • Open Democracy looked at the likely outcome of Crimean elections under Russian rule.
  • The Toronto Star revisited the unsettled state of affairs in the Central African Republic.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • blogTO shares pictures of Queen Street in the 1980s.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the idea of a digital detox.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper noting strange occultations of TW Hydrae.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to one paper suggesting plants can grow in simulated (and fertilized) Martian and lunar soil, and speculates Russia will be trying to build a space station of its own or to cooperate with China.
  • Eastern Approaches examines the shaky ceasefire in eastern Ukraine.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Joan Rivers was an early HIV/AIDS activist of note.
  • Language Hat summarizes a paper suggesting that language death and economic success are correlated.
  • Marginal Revolution considers Scottish separatism, wondering about the sense of either a currency union or a separate currency, and noting the increased possibility of separatism according to betters.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog critiques Mark Adomanis’ critique of Masha Gessen’s article on Russian demographics.
  • Savage Minds notes that, alas, Joan Rivers never majored in anthropology.
  • Torontoist notes that NDP Joe Cressy, defeated in his run for the Canadian parliament, is now running for city council.
  • Towleroad notes the firing of a pregnant lesbian teacher by a Catholic school, and observes the hatred felt by some anti-gay people who would like books celebrating children pleased when their same-sex parents die (among other things).
  • Understanding Society examines the sociology of influence.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy disagrees with Henry Farrell that laissez-faire ideology contributed to the Irish Famine.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Russian hostility towards the Crimean Tatar Meijis, reports on things Ukrainians think Ukraine should do doing the ceasefire and things Russians think Ukrainians should do (federalize and accept the loss of the east), notes high rates of childlessness in Moscow, and suggests that the Russian victory in eastern Ukraine is exceptionally pyrrhic.
  • At the Financial Times‘s The World blog, the point is made that a Scottish vote for independence would have profound implications worldwide.
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