A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘belarus

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • blogTO notes that a party celebrating the end of Rob Ford’s term as mayor is being planned for election night at City Hall.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the discovery of secondary targets for New Horizons after it passes Pluto.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper that looks to examine the oblateness or otherwise of some exoplanets discovered by Kepler.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to one paper examining underwater archeology and links to a series debating the question of whether or not there was a human presence 30 thousand years ago at a site in Uruguay.
  • Eastern Approaches reports on the aftermath of a failed claim by Radek Sikorski that Russia made a 2008 proposal on partitioning Ukraine.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a Costa Rican survey suggesting that up to a fifth of Costa Rican police think that harassing GLBT people is OK.
  • Language Hat notes the etymology of the Egyptian title of “khedive”, apparently obscure for a reason.
  • Language Log notes a contentious issue in Chinese translation: “rule of law” or “rule by law”?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the aftermath of a stunt at a Serbian-Albanian football game.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog considers estimates for Russian losses in Ukrainian fighing.
  • Towleroad notes that Argentina has granted asylum to a Russian GLBT claimant.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Ukrainian events have awakened Belarusian nationalism.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly describes the collapse of an online community she quite liked.
  • Cody Delistraty links to his article in The Atlantic about the benefits of multilingualism.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers the numbers and implications of low-wage earners.
  • The Frailest Things’ Michael Sacasas links to articles about big data, suggesting ways in which it undermines our sense of self-control.
  • Geocurrents considers alternate history maps.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that West Germany had high inflation in the 1970s and 1980s.
  • Otto Pohl thinks pan-Africanism can start by creating uniform electrical plugs.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers alternate histories for Mexico, paying particular attention to the idea of a smaller Mexico after 1848.
  • Spacing Toronto’s John Lorinc argues John Tory bested Olivia Chow by not being over-specific.
  • Torontoist notes the travails of a girl who became an amateur hockey player in the mid-1950s.
  • Window on Eurasia considers how Russian liberals could return Crimea, deconstructs the alleged Chinese threat, and notes a startlingly anti-Russian press conference delivered by Belarus’ Lukashenko.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Bad Astronomy shares a picture of the astonishingly crowded center of the Milky Way galaxy.
  • blogTO recommends things to do in the Junction and Liberty Village.
  • Centauri Dreans notes an interesting new binary star discovery, one where a hot Jupiter orbits each star.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on further research done of a close brown dwarf.
  • The Frailest Thing notes an interview with spaceflight proponent Elon Musk painting him as a messianic figure, a Moses or Noah.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that western Europe experienced growign longevity from an early age.
  • The New APPS Blog notes the intersections of philosophy, religion, and euthanasia.
  • Registan notes the arrival of Islamic banking in the former Soviet Union.
  • Steve Munro notes the return of streetcar service to Queens Quay.
  • Torontoist is skeptical of Olivia Chow’s transit plan, not detailed enough.
  • Towleorad reports on a Russian exchange student in the United States who has claimed asylum and reports on civil unions’ new introduction in Chile.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the weaknesses of the Belarusian economy, observes the linguistic links between Crimean Tatars and various north Caucasian peoples, argues that 1600 Russian soldiers have died, observes Russian belief that China is an ally, and notes that older Muslim communities in Moscow separate themselves from the newer immigrant communities.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • blogTO recommends things to do on the Danforth.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the importance of the discovery of water in the atmosphere of exoplanet HAT-P-11b.
  • Crooked Timber goes on at length about Kevin Williamson’s statement as noted by Joe. My. God. that women who have abortions should be executed.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes plans for futuristic architecture in Shenzhen.
  • Eastern Approaches observes the travails of a Roma soccer team in the Czech Republic.
  • Far Outliers notes two different movements of Romanian intellectuals responding to relative backwardness, pasoptism referring to the post-1848 effort at modernization and protocronism referring to efforts to claim all was invented first in Romania.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that in France, added years of education associated with avoiding conscription don’t produce different job results.
  • Spacing Toronto notes the failed visit of Upper Canadian reformer William Lyon Mackenzie to London in 1832.
  • Torontoist notes building regulations prevent Toronto from making use of green roofs.
  • Towleroad links to a study discussing the economic impact of anti-LGBT laws on Americans.
  • Why I Love Toronto talks about the importance of having a local barber.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russians will begin to draft first Chechens then Crimeans, notes increased state spending on Russia Today, observes the belief among some Russians that Ukraine is somehow not really a nation, and suggests that Belarus is cracking down on pro-Russians.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • blogTO notes a projection suggesting there will be nearly seven million Torontonians by 2025.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining how
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper examining a very unusual planetary system around a subdwarf B star and fears the Russo-Ukrainian war will heat up again.
  • Language Hat examines the nearly extinct dialect of Missouri French.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders about the impact of big data on the criminal justice system and argues Neew Zealand might have the best-designed government in the world.
  • Torontoist shares the 125 years of history of the Gladstone Hotel.
  • Towleroad notes that gay asylum seekers in Australia might be resettled in anti-gay Papua New Guinea.
  • Transit Toronto notes the expansion of wireless Internet to College station.
  • Window on Eurasia predicts that the European Union and the United States will try to engage Belarus while accepting the dictatorship.

[LINK] “Belarusians try out a new language: their own”

The Christian Science Monitor‘s Rachel Stern reports on what might be the beginning of a renaissance in usage of the Belarusian language in Belarus. Apparently Lukashenko’s government, hitherto content with presiding over the steady progress of Russian, is newly sympathetic to causes which might help differentiate Belarus from its eastern partner.

Every Monday evening, an airy contemporary art gallery in central Minsk is filled with a language rarely heard on Belarus’s streets: Belarusian.

An average of 240 people pack the premises of the gallery, dubbed Ў after a character that only exists in the Belarusian Cyrillic alphabet, for a free course to practice and fine-tune their skills in the official language. Since 1999, use of Belarusian has dropped dramatically in favor of Russian.

“We have our own language but most people here don’t use it,” says Veranika Famina, an actress who has been attending “Mova Nanova” – or “Language Anew” in Belarusian – since it launched in January 2014.

But many Belarusians are now taking an increased interest in their native language to assert their country’s own identity and culture apart from neighboring Russia. Mova Nanova and a growing number of unofficial linguistic initiatives are taking Belarusian beyond the school classes that it’s often isolated to and back into the public sphere.

“For young people, speaking Belarusian is cool. They feel more Europe-oriented,” says translator Iryna Harasimovich at the cafe at Ў, which showcases work only in Belarusian and English. “Belarus has historically been a pendulum between East and West and that’s only become more blatant due to the situation in Ukraine.”

Written by Randy McDonald

September 18, 2014 at 7:40 pm

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Claus Vistesen at Alpha Sources notes that the Italian economy has slipped back into recession.
  • blogTO identifies ten secret things in Toronto.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at gas giants with very unusual, even misaligned, orbits around their local suns.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one study on the internal geology of silicon-carbon worlds and to another on the moderating impact of oceans on planetary climates.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the Indian military buildup in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, and links to a study suggesting that even the very early Earth might have been hospitable towards life.
  • Geocurrents features a guest post from Will Rayner pointing out ways in which statistics can lie (Luxembourg looks very wealthy, but this is an artifact of a huge day-commuter workforce coming from outside of its frontiers).
  • Joe. My. God. reports that the Egyptian police seem to be using Grindr to hunt down gay men for arrests.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the ethnographic justification for the Soviet invasion and partition of Poland.
  • Spacing Toronto points to an upcoming photo exhibit showcasing Toronto’s tower neighbourhoods.
  • Torontoist reports on the success of urban agriculture as an experiment in New York City.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the deteriorating situation of Crimean Tatars and suggests Russia is preparing to move into the Baltic States.
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