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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘blogs

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • 3 Quarks Daily asks whether parenthood is morally respectable.
  • blogTO has vintage photos of Toronto’s neighbourhood of Corktown.
  • Centauri Dreams notes that a small moon may be condensing out of Saturn’s Ring A.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes evidence that close-orbiting “hot Jupiters” influence their stars.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes continuing progress in teasing out evidence of Neandertal ancestry from current populations.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that some Muslim cab drivers in Cleveland refuse to drive cabs with signs advertising the upc9oming Gay Games.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes on the minor scandal of Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s non-receipt of a symbolic degree from Brandeis University.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen seems unduly skeptical about Norway’s program of buying books by local authors for libraries, so as to subsidize literary production.
  • New APPS Blog contrasts the open citizenship of the Roman Republic with the closed citizenship of the Greek city-states, with Carthage being somewhere in between.
  • Towleroad explores continuing controversy around the use of Truvada as an alternative to condoms in HIV/AIDS prevention.
  • Transit Toronto notes the closing of several streets, notably Church Street, in downtown Toronto on the occasion of former Canadian finance minister Jim Flaherty’s funeral.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that contemporary Russians like their country’s open egress to the world and wouldn’t be pleased by transit restrictions, and observes that ethnic Russians in Estonia seem to be mobilizing against Russian annexation.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • blogTO shares a visual history of the Toronto Islands. (I really will have to get there this year.)
  • At Broadside Blog, Caitlin Kelly draws lessons from the experience of a journalist who literally overworked himself to death. When should people note their limits?
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that close-orbiting hot Neptune GJ 436b, even with its comet-like tail produced by heating from its sun, isn’t going to lose its atmosphere.
  • Eastern Approaches notes that Poland’s Donald Tusk is presiding over new military spending inspired by the Ukrainian crisis.
  • The Financial Times‘ The World blog and Eastern Approaches both deal with the international consequences of ongoing Russian involvement in eastern Ukraine, the former calling for broad sanctions.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if the Russian-majority city of Narva in northeastern Estonia will be the next target of Russia.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer discusses the implication of Russian gas price increases for Ukraine.
  • Torontoist notes the impact of CBC’s announced job cuts.
  • Towleroad links to a teaser for the new HBO movie version of The Lonely Heart and reports on Barbra Streisand’s explanation as to why she couldn’t get the movie made.
  • Une heure de peine’s Denis Colombi writes (in French) about the sociology of working hours in France and among the French.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that rising xenophobia in Russia is alienating many non-Russians and reports on one Russia who argues that there isn’t a necessary conflict between liberalism and imperialism.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • blogTO shares vintage pictures of Toronto’s Ossington Avenue.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the potential discovery of an exomoon of a rogue planet.
  • D-Brief notes that stars can apparently form in nebulae of much lower density than previous believed.
  • The Frailest Thing quotes Hannah Arendt on the race between success and catastrophe.
  • Geocurrents takes a look at the deeply divided island of Cyprus.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Utah is now trying to block gay adoption.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money’s Erik Loomis is critical of American outcry regarding French labour laws limiting work-related communications after 6 pm.
  • Torontoist notes that Rob Ford is now a protagonist in a custom faction of the venerable game Civilization.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy quotes Frederick Douglass’ sage words on Chinese immigration.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russians are willing to support Putin so long as nothing bad happens and notes that Russians are emigrating from the Siberian republic of Tuva.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams looks at how the inability to make contact with the long-departed ISEE-3 probe offers hints as to the problems with long-duration spaceflight.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze considers Beta Pictoris’ planets, one paper considering the orbit of Beta Pictoris b and another wondering if the identified planet might in fact be massive dust clouds from planetesimal collisions.
  • The Dragon’s Tales explores the latest in Ukraine.
  • Far Outliers notes the collapse of Japanese forces in Papua New Guinea, from Phillip Bradley’s Hell’s Battlefield (1, 2, 3).
  • A Fistful of Euros’ Alex Harrowell considers the extent to which electronic communications are compromisable.
  • The Planetary Society Blog celebrates Yuri’s Night, an upcoming celebration of spaceflight on the 12th of this month.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders how many Salvadorans were displaced from Honduras after the Soccer War of 1968 and considers certain parallels in ethnic minority politics between French Algeria and Russian Crimea.
  • Strange Maps notes that Portugal’s territory is almost entirely water, a combination of its extensive coastline, associated seas, and dispersed archipelagos.
  • Transit Toronto notes that the stretch of Yonge subway by Eglinton will be closed down this Saturday owing to emergency repairs.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi describes the many ways in which he has sold his books.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Kazakhstan is taking greater care regarding the Russian language after Crimea, and notes pressures in Kyrgyzstan.

    [BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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    • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait revisits the skydiver/meteorite video. It looks like it was just a rock in the chute.
    • Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the benefits of leaving one’s comfort zone.
    • At False Steps, Paul Drye presents the life of Mercury capsule designer Max Faget.
    • A Fistful of Euros’ Doug Merrill warns (1, 2) about the growing scope of Russia’s actions in Ukraine.
    • The Financial Times‘ Gideon Rachman argues that Russia under Putin is trying to destroy the current Ukrainian state.
    • Joe. My. God. notes that the two daughters of Lyndon Baines Johnson think that American president would likely support same-sex marriage based on his principles.
    • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, Scott Lemieux celebrates the defeat of the Parti Québécois as something that would protect religious freedom.
    • Marginal Revolution hosts a discussion in the comments surrounding the economic policies of Narendra Modi, aspirant for the Indian presidency.
    • John Moyer writes about the virtues of revisiting some books (here, James Joyce’s Dubliners).
    • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if Russian expansion into Ukraine will encourage imperialism generally and wonders how the ZunZuneo social networking project in Cuba was supposed to prmote democracy.
    • At the Russian Demographics blog, the author notes that Russia stands out not only among European countries but among the BRICs.
    • Window on Eurasia holds that Ukrainian Muslims prefer Ukraine to Russia and argues in favour of a sustained policy of non-recognition of Crimea’s annexation.

    [BLOG] Some Saturday links

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    • At Antipope, Charlie Stross wonders why we need to work so long when productivity and per capita wealth have skyrocketed.
    • At the Broadside Blog, Caitlin Kelly describes a week in her life as a writer.
    • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting that ancient Population III stars could, in theory, have rocky planets.
    • The Dragon’s Tales warns that the Japanese economy is about to tank.
    • Joe. My. God. notes that young conservative Ben Shapiro is now boycotting Mozilla after Brandon Eich’s departure.
    • Savage Minds has an essay by anthropologist Elizabeth Chin suggesting that Lamilly, a new anatomically-correct doll, won’t take off because issues with beauty are much more deeply embedded in the culture than the designers believe.
    • The Signal examines the proliferation of E-mail storage formats.
    • The Volokh Conspiracy’s Jonathan Adler doesn’t like the pressure applied to Brandon Eich.
    • Window on Eurasia has two posts warning that Crimea’s annexation to Russia will destabilize the Russian Federation, one arguing that ethnic minorities and their republics will be put in a state of flux, the other arguing that Russian nationalists will be upset by the concession of so many rights to Crimean Tatars.

    [BLOG] Some Friday links

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    • D-Brief shares the news that scientists think that Saturn’s moon Enceladus has a subsurface ocean in its southern polar region.
    • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a remarkable paper claiming that red dwarf stars are exceptionally likely to have a planet in their circumstellar habitable zones.
    • The Dragon’s Tales links to an other paper on Mars suggesting that world was never very hot, even in its youth.
    • Eastern Approaches suggests that Poland is approaching the point of relative energy-independence from Russia.
    • The Financial Times The World blog reports on the failure of a US-subsidized Cuban social networking system.
    • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas links to an account of an 1895 conversation between Paul Valéry and a Chinese friend suggesting that Chinese may have had different perspectives on technology than Westerners.
    • Geocurrents’ Martin Lewis notes Ukrainian regionalism, observing that the Europe-leaning west/centre region has inside it a strongly nationalist Galicia and a regionalist Ruthene-leaning Transcarpathia.
    • Joe. My. God. points to the story of a Floridian sex offender who tried to burn down the home of a lesbian couple and their eight children just because.
    • Personal Reflection’s Jim Belshaw explores the origin of the word “bogey” in Australian English to mean swimming hole.
    • The Planetary Society Blog’s Bruce Betts reports on the progress made in the search for planets at Alpha Centauri. (So far, no evidence for Alpha Centauri Bb, but then the technology isn’t sensitive enough to confirm that world’s existence.)
    • Towleroad reports on the controversy surrounding the recent resignation of former Mozilla Brandon Eich, Andrew Sullivan aligning with left-wingers and Michael Signorile making the point that Eich’s donations to people like Pat Buchanan tipped things over.
    • Window on Eurasia comments on the successful program of the Kazakhstani government to settle ethnic Kazakhs in the once-Russian-majority north of the country so as to prevent a secession.

    [BLOG] Some Thursday links

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    • At The Dragon’s Tales, Will Baird reports that Sweden and Finland, spooked by Crimea, are now contemplating NATO membership.
    • On a very different note, The Dragon’s Tales also notes that Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus, with a Europa-like ocean underneath, is perfectly suited for a space mission.
    • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that workers are dying on World Cup construction sites in Brazil as well as in Qatar.
    • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla notes the very recent discovery of Kuiper belt object 2013 FY27, big enough to be a dwarf planet.
    • The Volokh Conspiracy links to a profile of the blog and its blogger in Tablet magazine.
    • Window on Eurasia has a series of links. One argues that Russia’s weakness not its strength motivated the move into Crimea, another argues that a Russian invasion of Ukraine would be a catastrophe and that the Russian government knows it, another observes Belarus’ alienation from federation with Russia.

    [BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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    • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly makes a case about the benefits of radical honesty.
    • At the Buffer, Belle Beth Cooper describes how she has streamlined her writing style.
    • The Dragon’s Tales notes that China’s space station isn’t doing much.
    • Eastern Approaches observes the continuing popularity of Polish populist Lech Kaczynski.
    • The Financial Times‘ The World blog notes the vulnerable popularity of UKIP’s Nigel Farage.
    • Geocurrents’ Asya Perelstvaig comments on the entry of Jewish businessman Vadim Rabinovich into the Ukrainian presidential contest.
    • Joe. My. God. is unconvinced by the suggestion that marriage equality means the end of gay bars.
    • Lawyers, Guns and Money’s Erik Loomis speculates about the responsibility of American consumers for air pollution in exporting Asia.
    • At the Planetary Society Blog, Constantine Tsang describes evidence for volcanism on Venus.
    • Savage Minds interviews one Laura Forlano on the intersections between anthropology and design.
    • Towleroad mourns the death of godfather of house music Frankie Knuckles.

    [BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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    • At the blog Buffer, Kevan Lee shows what lengths–in characters and in words–tweets and blog headlines and blog posts should be, according to science.
    • Patrick Cain notes that Canadians have no way of knowing how many banned guns there were under the former registry since its junking.
    • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining what, exactly, is needed for a planet to become Earth-like.
    • The Dragon’s Tales, meanwhile, links to a paper claiming that the Cambrian explosion of biodiversity was a product of a nearby gamma-ray burst.
    • Geocurrents explores the question of whether and how it matters to call the eastern European country “Ukraine” or “the Ukraine”.
    • Joe. My. God. links to a site gathering the first and last lines from noted gay novels.
    • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, bloggers question whether the American soldiers who perpetrated genocide in the Wounded Knee massacre of 1890 should have their Medals of Honor stripped from them, and have no truck with the idea that American airpower can save Ukraine.
    • John Moyer responded to OKCupid’s boycotting of Mozilla for its anti-gay president by quitting Mozilla, and explains why.
    • At the Planetary Society Weblog, Emily Lakdawalla examines the latest thinking on Titan’s methane lakes and oceans. Where do they come from?
    • pollotenchegg maps the distribution of Hungarians in former Hungarian territories in central Europe.
    • Strange Maps examines how maps are used to lie in George Orwell’s 1984.
    • Torontoist shares a picture of a vintage streetcar on the streets of east Toronto’s Scarborough.
    • The Volokh Conspiracy comments on the International Court of Justice’s ruling against Japan on the subject of its supposed scientific whaling program, and argues that a federal system for Ukraine might not be bad notwithstanding Russian bullying.
    • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia’s military depends heavily on the technological and industrial output of southeastern Ukraine, relying on now-suspended cooperation.
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