A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘china

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • The Cranky Sociologists notes the dynamics and statistics of global aging.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes the effect of tides on Mercury, Jupiter’s moon Io, and exoplanet Kepler 10c.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the deployment of Russian nuclear-armed missiles within range of China and questions the possibility of an astronomical event in the 9th century.
  • The Financial Times‘s The World notes that Germany and Italy are disputing the governance of the Eurozone.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the United Nations is now recognizing the legal same-sex marriages of its workers.
  • Language Log looks at the new Chinese tradition of water calligraphy.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the risk of cruise missile proliferation in Southeast Asia versus China.
  • Window on Eurasia notes concern among some Russians that China might want to take over parts of Siberia Crimea-style.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • blogTO shares pictures of the lineups for free food on Canada Day at Mandarin’s buffet restaurants.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper identifying three thousand nearby red dwarf stars as potential sites of Earth-like exoplanets.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a sober assessment of the Chinese space program.
  • The Frailest Thing considers the import of Facebook’s experiment on its user base by noting the ability of complex systems to undergo unexpected catastrophes.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Google’s social network Orkut, big in Brazil and India but absent elsewhere, will be shutting down at the end of this September.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that anti-gay activists are pleased with the Hobby Lobby ruling.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Adam Block shares pictures of colliding and interacting galaxies.
  • Seriously Science notes that not only do spiders have different personality types, but that these types contribute to the maintenance of their physical cultures.
  • The Signal notes ongoing research into data recovery methods and issues with compact discs.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes cases where putting the victim on trial does matter. (Records of past violence are noteworthy.)
  • Towleroad notes an economist observing that homophobia has an economic impact and points to an upcoming Irish referendum on same-sex marriage in 2015 that’s quite likely to pass.
  • Window on Eurasia quotes a Ukrainian about Russia’s issues with a separate Ukraine and notes a statement by Kaliningrad’s government claiming some Ukrainian refugees in Russia might be anti-Russian activists in disguise.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

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  • Al Jazeera shares Sarah Kendzior’s argument that the disappearance of shopping malls will not mean the automatic return of downtowns in many cities, and notes the migration of many young Americans–including Vietnamese-Americans–to a booming Vietnam.
  • Business Week observes that in higher education, China wants more people with vocational degrees and fewer academics, while comments that the use of Minnan dialect by China’s spokesperson to Taiwan isn’t doing much to encourage reunification.
  • The CBC shares the request of American retailer target to its customers to please leave their guns home, and notes a finding in Québec that penalized Wal-Mart for closing down a store there after its workforce became unionized.
  • National Geographic notes evidence from an Archaeopreryx fossil that feathers evolved before flight, and comments on the cultural and other issues that make fighting the Ebola epidemic in West Africa so difficult.
  • Universe Today notes there are no lunar seas on the far side of the Moon because of the heat of the Earth in the Moon’s early days reached only the near side, and comments on the evidence of asteroid impacts on the surface of Vesta.

[LINK] “Argentina Once More on the Map, Invited by BRICS”

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Fabiana Frayssinet’s Inter Press Service article suggesting that Argentina might join the BRICS club of emerging economies caught my attention. I wonder if it will actually change much, mind, apart from being a signal of the country’s reintegration with the global financial network. Noel?

As Argentina starts to mend fences with the international financial markets, the emerging powers that make up the BRICS bloc invited it to their next summit. This could be a step towards this country’s reinsertion in the global map, after its ostracism from the credit markets since the late 2001 debt default.

For now, there is no letter “A” in the BRICS acronym, which stands for Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. But in Buenos Aires speculation is rife about whether it should be called BRICSA, ABRICS or BRICAS, if Argentina is admitted.

The invitation for President Cristina Fernández to participate in the group’s sixth summit, scheduled for Jul. 15 in the northeast Brazilian city of Fortaleza, is seen as another sign that Latin America’s third-largest economy may be incorporated, after India, Brazil and South Africa indicated their interest.

[. . .]

The formal invitation to Fernández was issued by Russia, which also thus confirmed its support.

“I think this shows that Argentina is fully inserted in international relations, not ‘isolated from the world’,” Nicolás Tereschuk, a political scientist at UBA, told IPS. “It simply doesn’t toe the line with the policies of the central countries at just any cost or in any circumstances, as it used to do at other times in its history.”

Argentina’s invitation from BRICS came almost simultaneously with the May 28 announcement of an agreement reached by the Fernández administration and the Paris Club, which this country owed 9.7 billion dollars since the default 13 years ago.

Written by Randy McDonald

June 24, 2014 at 7:27 pm

[ISL] “China Builds Artificial Islands in South China Sea”

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I’m not sure that the artificial islands being built by China in the South China Sea actually count, at least insofar as they can change maritime boundaries. As noted by BusinessWeek‘s Joel Quinto, these by themselves are enough to serve as bases.

Sand, cement, wood, and steel are China’s weapons of choice as it asserts its claim over the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. China, the Philippines, Malaysia, Vietnam, Taiwan, and Brunei have sparred for decades over ownership of the 100 islands and reefs, which measure less than 1,300 acres in total but stretch across an area about the size of Iraq. In recent months, vessels belonging to the People’s Republic have been spotted ferrying construction materials to build new islands in the sea. Pasi Abdulpata, a Filipino fishing contractor who in October was plying the waters near Parola Island in the northern Spratlys, says he came across “this huge Chinese ship sucking sand and rocks from one end of the ocean and blasting it to the other using a tube.”

Artificial islands could help China anchor its claim to waters that host some of the world’s busiest shipping lanes. The South China Sea may hold as much as 11 billion barrels of oil and 190 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, according to a 2013 report by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. China has considered the Spratlys—which it calls Nansha—part of its territory since the 1940s and on occasion has used its military might to enforce its claim. In 1988 a Chinese naval attack at Johnson South Reef, in the northern portion of the archipelago, killed 64 Vietnamese border guards.

At a briefing last month, Voltaire Gazmin, the Philippine defense minister, said land reclamation work at Johnson South Reef started in February. There have been reports of Chinese activity at two other reefs in the Spratlys. “They are creating artificial islands that never existed since the creation of the world,” says Eugenio Bito-onon, mayor of a sparsely populated stretch of the archipelago called Kalayaan. “The construction is massive and nonstop,” he says, and could pave the way for China’s “total control of the South China Sea.”

Such alarm has been stoked by Chinese news reports, such as one in February on the online portal Qianzhan. com that said Beijing had drawn up a plan to build a military base at Fiery Cross Reef, about 90 miles west of Johnson South. Establishing islands equipped with airstrips would allow China to set up an air defense zone similar to the one it created in November over a group of islands in the East China Sea where it’s contesting sovereignty with Japan.

Written by Randy McDonald

June 24, 2014 at 7:23 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • James Bow mourns the loss of the Northlander train route connecting northern Ontario with the south.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes a Saudi Arabian announcement that it will be boosting military spending by 20%.
  • The Financial Times‘ The World blog notes growing Brazilian confidence in the outcome of the World Cup.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell notes the complexities of governance and procedure in the European Parliament.
  • Language Hat notes the long and changing history of ethnic identity in the Crimean peninsula.
  • Language Log’s Victor Mair notes from first-hand experience the complex language and script situation in Macau and Hong Kong.
  • The New APPS Blog features suggestions for institutional reform in the European Union.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that, to ingratiate itself with the European Union, Albania won’t accept transit fees for the impending Trans-Adriatic pipeline.
  • Spacing Toronto remembers the time when Toronto’s subway network was the best in North America.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs notes how a steamship disaster helped erase the Manhattan neighbourhood of Little Germany from the map of New York City.
  • Torontoist fact-checks an Olivia Chow speech, finding it boringly accurate and unambitious.
  • Towleroad notes how a Dutch town proposed setting up a gay ghetto to call out local homophobia.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Ukrainian Orthodox Christian leaders are rejecting the Russian church’s authority, and observes that the Ukrainian government is now demanding that ethnic Ukrainians in Russia receive good treatment as an ethnic minority.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining what happens to complex organic chemicals in emergent planetary systems when irradiated.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper examining the impact of Antarctic sea ice on ocean flows.
  • Joe. My. God. shares Jimmy Somerville’s revisiting of his 1984 hit “Smalltown Boy”.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper claiming tax evasion is responsible for the developed world’s financial ills.
  • Steve Munro revisits the issue of articulated buses on Bathurst Street.
  • Towleroad notes Nate Silver’s argument that most people belonging to Hillary Clinton’s demographic would have been in favour of same-sex marriage as early as the early 1990s.
  • Transit Toronto points to a screening next week of three transit-related films.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that Argentina is now vulnerable to American creditors wanting state-owned property as compensation for Argentine debts.
  • Window on Eurasia considers federalism in Azerbaijan and wonders about prospects for Chinese guest workers in Russia.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams features an essay by Andreas Hein arguing that interstellar travel will be quite easy after the singularity hits, when our minds can be copied onto physical substrates.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that the dispute between Vietnam and China over their maritime boundaries runs the risk of intensifying.
  • Far Outliers chronicles the Australian creation of the Ferdinand radio network in the 1930s, a network of civilian radio broadcasters in northern Australia and Papua New Guinea charged with reporting on border security.
  • Joe. My. God. notes controversy in Israel over a harmless music video by trans pop star Dana International.
  • Language Hat notes one Russian writer’s suggestion on how Russian-language writers can avoid Russian state censorship: write in officially recognized variants of the Russian language (Ukrainian Russian, Latvian Russian, et cetera).
  • Language Log examines “patchwriting”, a subtle variant of plagiarism.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is just one blog noting the insanity of George F. Will’s claim that being a rape victim on a university campus is a coveted status.
  • The Map Room’s Jonathan Crowe links to OpenGeoFiction, an online collaborative map-creation fiction.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that, before Hitler, the Biblical pharoah was the figure used as the embodiment of evil.
  • The New APPS Blog takes issue with the claim that photographs sully our memories. Arguably they supplement it instead.
  • Personal Reflection’s Jim Belshaw notes, following Australia’s recent budget cuts, how young people lacking connections can find it very difficult to get ahead.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that ethnic minorities and secessionist groups in Moldova are being mobilized as that country moves towards the European Union, and observes the maritime sanctions placed against Crimean ports.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell is very skeptical of UKIP founder Alan Sked’s statements that the party was founded free of bigotry.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes 2MASS J05233822-1403022, 40 light years away, a very low-mass star that’s just barely massive enough to be an actual star, not a brown dwarf. (The lowest-mass, in fact.)
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the peculiarities of giant planets orbiting giant stars.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper analyzing archeological remnants (shell middens) of the earliest Maori settlers in New Zealand.
  • Joe. My. God. notes Roman Catholic cleric Robert Carlson, testifying about sexual abuse cases during his tenure as a bishop in Minnesota, stating he wasn’t sure if priests having sex with children was criminal.
  • Language Log’s Victor Mair takes another look at the situation with the Arabic-language translation of Frozen, noting similarities and differences between the sociolinguistics of Arabic and Chinese.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the use of slave labour–often immigrant–in the fisheries of Thailand.
  • Marginal Revolution comments on the exceptional difficulty of reforming Pemex, the Mexican state oil company.
  • The Search looks at the results of a conference on community digital archiving, noting that the actual software is only a small portion of the overall effort.
  • Savage Minds’ Simone notes the importance of text and tourism, looking at guide books to the Nordic Faroe Islands.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs describes a proposed urban development in Scandinavia, uniting Norway’s Oslo, Denmark’s Copenhagen, and the west coast of Sweden.
  • Towleroad notes that Hong Kong is not allowing Britons the right to marry–including same-sex marry–at the British consulate in that city-state.
  • Window on Eurasia notes potential problems with new Russian legislation on dual citizenship.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • At the Cranky Sociologists, SocProf notes the militarization of policing in the United States.
  • The Dragon’s Tales updates us on fighting in the east of Ukraine.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog’s Jonathan Wynn notes the quiet potential for controversy over representations of non-traditional gender and sexual orientation.
  • Far Outliers discovers the first American official graves in Japan (dating from the mid-19th century, in Hakodate) and the first Japanese official graves in the United States (dating from the late 19th century, in Hawaii).
  • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, Robert Farley links to his analysis of what a war between China and the United States would look like. It would be costly for both, though perhaps more for the Americans.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen observes the extreme dependence of the economy of Afghanistan on war-related subsidies.
  • Torontoist’s Desmond Cole makes the case that affordable housing is a major but unexplored issue in this election.
  • Towleroad notes the racism expressed by the “Mr. Gay May” selected by Têtu magazine in France.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the latest developments in the libel case brought by global warming scientist Michael Mann against Mark Steyn.
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