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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘glbt issues

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • 3 Quarks Daily links to an article examining the plight of Iraqi immigrants in Arizona.
  • A Budding Sociologist’s Commonplace Book links to a discussion about the connection between the Coase Theorem and legroom on airplane flights.
  • blogTO notes a new townhouse development on Ossington above Dupont.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper examining the once-stable, newly-changing climate of northern Labrador.
  • Language Log notes that some Dalit in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh want to raise a monument to a goddess of the English language.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that in the American situation, switching to a multi-party system wouldn’t make politics more responsive.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Japanese exports are substantially below their 2008 peak, and observes that remittances lower crime rates in Mexico.
  • More Words, Deeper Hole’s James Nicoll reviews an anthology of Andre Norton’s science fiction.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes that the search for SETI via optical signalling is newly ongoing.
  • Torontoist shares photos of the TTC’s new streetcars.
  • Towleroad links to a Gallup poll looking for the best and worst countries for non-heterosexuals around the world.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes contexts in which wearing Confederate flag T-shirts creates a hostile work environment, and links to an American judge’s scathing criticism of two states’ gay marriage bans.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the mobilization of Buddhists, lists potential Russian military targets in Ukraine, and suggests that a Russian war effort in Ukraine will be problematic.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • blogTO notes the continuing problems of Toronto’s food truck project.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes the differences between transit and radial velocity detection methods for planets and the relative advantages for detecting planets in stellar habitable zones, and links to a paper describing how hot Jupiters can become super-Earths.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the changing strategic situation of Australia.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that most of IKEA’s photo shoots are actually computer-assembled from stock imagery.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the impending retirement of Berlin’s gay mayor Klaus Wowereit.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that anti-Obamacare red states are hurting their poor citizens.
  • New APPS Blog considers the question of what makes happy children.
  • Towleroad notes anti-gay persecution by Lebanese police and quotes the mayor of Kazakhstan’s capital city talking badly about non-heterosexuals.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the emigration of Kazakhs and even Uighurs from Xinjiang to Kazakhstan, touches upon Western disillusionment with Russia, notes the possible impending defection of most of the Ukrainian churches of the Russian Orthodox Church to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, and reports on the relocation of a Ukrainian factory to Russia.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • io9 argues that it’s time to survey Uranus, notwithstanding its name.
  • blogTO describes the attractive-sounding art-friendly Harbord Laundry.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes archeological evidence suggesting that Vanuatu was settled three thousand years ago.
  • Joe. My. God. has comments about the Burger King-Tim Horton’s merger that really bring American outrage over the shift of the resulting company to Canada for tax purposes home.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the creepy locker-room homophobias of ESPN.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that China is now officially building much more housing than it actually needs.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers various designs for probes to Jupiter’s moon of Europa.
  • Torontoist and blogTO note that Yorkville institution the Coffee Mill is closing down.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy reacts critically to a survey claiming three-quarters of whites have no non-white friends.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Russian concern that support for federalism in Ukraine might spread to Russia, observes the prominent role of Tatars in fighting for Russia in the First World War, and refers to the explicit concerns of Nazarbayev that Kazakhization not be carried too quickly lest the country risk Ukraine’s fate.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • 3 Quarks Daily considers the ethics of suicide.
  • Slate‘s Atlas Obscura blog shares photos of Second World War relics in Alaska’s Aleutian islands.
  • The Big Picture shares images of Australia’s doll hospital.
  • blogTO lists five things Toronto could learn from New York City.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes China’s growing presence in Latin America and observes that apes and hmans share the same kind of empathy.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the coming out of an Irish beauty queen.
  • Marginal Revolution expects inequality to start growing in New Zealand.
  • Discover‘s Out There looks forward to the new age of exploration of Pluto and the rest of the Kuiper belt.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares beautiful photo mosaics of Neptune from Voyager 2.
  • The Search examines in an interview the use of a hundred million photo dataset from Flickr for research.
  • Torontoist notes a mayoral debate on Toronto heritage preservation.
  • Towleroad observes that a pro-GLBT advertisement won’t air on Lithuanian television because of restrictive legislation.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Ukrainian refugees are being resettled in the North Caucasus to bolster Slav numbers and predicts the quiet decline of the Russian Orthodox Church in Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • blogTO reports on the latest doings of blood-painting artist Istvan Kantor.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze posts links to a two-part study (1, 2) suggesting that there aren’t any high-energy galaxy-dominating civilizations in the universe, at least not easily detectable ones.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that a serial killer of gay men in Seattle says he was trying to wreak vengeance for American policy in the Middle East.
  • Language Log analyses a fascinating study of pronoun use by gender on Facebook.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money marks the 200th anniversary of the burning of the White House in the War of 1812.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw is tiring of the use of slogans as a replacement for communication.
  • Livejournal’s pollotenchegg maps the demographics of Kiev.
  • Towleroad reports on the furor prompted by Sam Smith’s dismissal of dating apps like Grindr as not conducive to romance.
  • Transit Toronto celebrates the imminent return of streetcars to Spadina Avenue.
  • Window on Eurasia links to a Russian analyst who thinks that Stalin shouldn’t have annexed Galicia to the Soviet Union, so as to prevent the formation of a separate and potentially anti-Russian Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • blogTO ranks the five busiest subway stations in Toronto.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the idea of using charged particle beams to propel sails.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin notes how some American conservatives blame Ebola on DDT bans.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that exoplanet Kepler 91b, detected by its eclipses of the sun, has been confirmed through radial velocity measurements.
  • The Dragon’s Tale suggests that a mysterious event reported in 775 CE around Eurasia may have been a cometary impact.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers if future shock, once a generational thing, may now be coming more quickly than that.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the decline of the American bathhouse, reports on a Spanish legislator who blames the national debt on same-sex marriage, and observes an anti-HIV organization’s campaign against PReP.
  • Languages of the World’s Asya Perelstvaig examines the origins of Yiddish.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money approves of Bulgarians repainting Soviet war monuments in superheros.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that the Unied States’ economic problems began long before 2008.
  • Otto Pohl reports from Ghana, in the middle of economic and currency collapse.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla notes that the Rosetta spacecraft is current scouting a landing site for its Philae landing on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
  • Torontoist describes how Arnold Palmer got his start at the Canadian Open.
  • Towleroad argues that out actor John Barrowman is a gay icon, and suggests that an anti-gay pogrom in Uganda may not have happened.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that today is the 75th anniversary of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact that divided northeastern Europe up between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Russia’s moves in Ukraine have harmed its Asian interests vis-a-vis China and argues that recent events have consolidated support for Ukrainian statehood.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • blogTO wonders, in the aftermath of companies confiscating bicycles parked on city property, if Toronto should clearly mark off public and private space on its streets.
  • Centauri Dreams studies news that the Stardust probe may have captured bits of the interstellar medium.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports that sun-like Alpha Centauri A and B can both support planets in stable Earth-like orbits.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the impact of changing patterns of snowfall on Arctic ice.
  • Eastern Approaches studies Balkan volunteers in wars abroad, both that of Albanians in the Middle East and of Serbs for Russia in Ukraine.
  • Far Outliers looks at Japan’s farmer-soldiers on the late 19th century Hokkaido frontier.
  • Spacing Toronto favourably reviews the new psychogeography-themed book Unruly Places.
  • Understanding Society points to the massive success of a comparative statistical analysis of historical Eurasian populations.
  • Window on Eurasia links to a photo essay of an empty post-Olympics Sochi.
  • Writing Through the Fog’s Cheri Lucas Rowlands argues that modern social media hinders memoir writing, by making it too easy to publish quickly.
  • Wonkman points out that the problem with subtle homoeroticism in modern popular culture is that, well, it doesn’t need to be subtle any more. What needs to be hidden?
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