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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

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[NEWS] Some Monday links

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  • Al Jazeera notes the likely controversies surrounding a new Chinese cartoon spotlighting an Uighur concubine of a Chinese emperor, and looks at the deeper diversity of Martha’s Vineyard.
  • Bloomberg notes the risk of Israel slumping into recession, reports on Burger King’s interest in acquiring Tim Hortons, notes that Côte d’Ivoire is still trying to sell public debt, comments on the role played by Dutch anger over the MH17 plane attacl in organizing the European Union sanctions against Russia, and describes the slim hope for upcoming Russian-Ukrainian talks.
  • CBC Prince Edward Island reports on a shocking double homicide in eastern Prince Edward Island, a shooting of a father and his son.
  • The Forward wonders who leaked an Israeli cabinet consideration of the reoccupation of Gaza.
  • An older MacLean’s report suggests that Tim Horton’s depends on low-cost imported labour to sustain an ultimately unsustainable growth strategy. A much newer one reports on the defection of another Bloc Québécois MP.
  • The Toronto Standard notes that Rob and Doug Ford were the only people on city council to vote against a new practice facility for the Toronto Raptors.
  • Universe Today notes that the ESA has selected five landing sites for the Philae comet lander, and observes that NASA’s New Horizons Pluto probe has just crossed the orbit of Neptune.
  • In the realm of photography, Wired reports on Humans of New York’s new global coverage and examines street photography in New York City.

[NEWS] Some Saturday links

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  • Al Jazeera America argues that depending on cars will hurt Newark’s urban renaissance, notes the emerging Indian-Israeli alliance and the import of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in sectarian communities in Northern Ireland, looks at the slowly reviving film industry of Côte d’Ivoire, chronicles the human rights issues of LGB Ukrainians and of Christian sects in the Caucasus, examines the legacies of German immigration in Brazil, and looks at the shantytowns of Mongolia.
  • Al Jazeera examines Russia’s Eurasianism, notes emergent water shortages in Syria, looks at the reaction of Sephardic Jews to a new Spanish citizenship law that would give them access to Spain, and chronicles the persecution of the Ahmadiyya in Pakistan.
  • Bloomberg notes that sanctions on Russia may hurt the Greek economy, notes the collapse in wages for young people in southern Europe, and looks at Germany’s serious impending demographic issues.
  • BusinessWeek looks at Tinder’s shabby treatment of a female co-founder, examines the stagnant economy of Thailand, looks at hospitals which mine credit card data to predict their future patients.
  • CBC notes with disappearance of anonymous public WiFi in Russia, takes a look at the consequences of the shutdown of the McCain potato processing plant in Borden-Carleton, points out the ongoing collapse of a caribou herd on the Québec-Labrador border, shows the sad toll of the Air Algérie plane crash in Québec, and notes that Vancouver’s aquarium can no longer breed cetaceans.
  • Global News looks at the impact of Air Algérie’s disaster in Montreal.
  • MacLean’s suggests Canada is not immune to an American-style housing crash, argues that the Canadian job market is weaker than it appears, and reports on the claims that restrictive American immigration policies could work to the benefit of Canada.
  • National Geographic notes some surprisingly social cephalopod populations and looks at naming ceremonies for some gorillas in Rwanda.
  • NPR reports that some big data firms claim Snowden’s data release has given terrorists ideas as to how they can be quieter, and notes some Ivoirien cacao farmers who taste
  • The New York Times notes the closure of an Upper East Side restaurant priced out by rising rents.
  • Reuters observes the worsening demographics of Italy.
  • Transitions Online takes a small-scale look on the effects of emigration in Uzbekistan.
  • Universe Today looks at how some Martian canyons were formed by different water releases.
  • Xinhua notes how emigration from Portugal has become mainstream.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Cody Delistraty links to an article of his at The Atlantic examining the connection between beauty and happiness.
  • A Fistful of Euros’ Edward Hugh looks at Abenomics in Japan and notes that Japan’s economic problems run much too deep for simple fiscal and interest-rate changes to change.
  • On Tumblr, I Give In shares pictures of lady slipper flowers growing in abundance at CFB Gatetown.
  • Joe. My God., Lawyers, Guns and Money, and Towleroad all share the news that Texas governor Rick Perry was indicted on multiple felony charges.
  • Language Hat shares a paper suggesting that most languages above a certain size (35 thousand speakers) are not declining).
  • Languages of the World’s Asya Perelstvaig reposts her study of the correlation between ethnicity and political parties in Israel.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money traces the ongoing deterioration in Russian-Ukrainian relations to the point of open war.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the economy of Switzerland and wonders if deflation is a problem for the European economy.
  • Spacing Toronto shares a photo of the view over the Bathurst bridge.
  • Towleroad notes the struggles of gay Palestinians in Israel.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes problems with regulating certain Jewish rites on sanitary grounds.

[BLOG] Some culture-related links

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  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas takes a look at the role of the Church in fostering technological and other innovation.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that ex-ex-gays are skeptical about claims of sexual orientation conversion, notes a study suggesting that Truvada does protect against HIV infection, and shares the news with Language Hat that the oldest ancient erotic graffiti has been found and turns out to be gay.
  • Languages of the World’s Asya Perelstvaig notes how ridiculous it is to talk about “simple” languages.
  • Language Hat notes a study comparing the intelligibility of Maltese with different nearby Arabic varieties and examines the origins of the shtetl.
  • Language Log disapproves of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes‘ depiction of emergent ape language.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the internal passports of whites living in the Confederacy and notes that farmworkers in California are suffering from the drought.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that the languages of the world are more resilient to globalization than suspected, comments on immigration in Germany, and notes the study suggesting same-sex parents do a better than average job of raising their children.
  • The New APPS Blog traces the moral depravity of some pro-Israeli commentators and wonders if underfunding of infrastructure is bringing us to the days of the end of Rome.
  • The Numerati’s Stephen Baker notes that some drivers in Los Angeles appear to really dislike his ode to jaywalking.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw draws from memories of old horse-drawn Gypsy carts in Australia to talk about the importance of animal power in history.
  • Livejournal’s pollotenchegg maps the distribution of ethnic Russians in Ukraine.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that China’s sex imbalances seem to echo historical Australian patterns.
  • The Search interviews online cuture scholar danah boyd.
  • Towleroad links to an Iranian government study of young people’s sexuality suggesting, among other things, that 17% of surveyed students are gay.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi talks about the existence of transfolk in his Old Man’s War universe.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell examines the political consequences of spam.

[BLOG] Some politics-related links

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  • 3 Quarks Daily links to an essayist wondering why people talked about Gaza not the Yezidis as a way to dismiss Gaza.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly notes how Americans subsidize Walmart’s low wages by givibng its employees benefits.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Chinese plans to reforest Tibet could accelerate the dessication of its watershed since trees suck up water, observes the existence of a new Chinese ICBM and links to a report of a Chinese drone, notes that the ecologies of Europe are especially vulnerable to global warming owing to their physical fragmentation, and notes that Canadian-Mexican relations aren’t very friendly.
  • Eastern Approaches notes Russia’s reaction to the shootdown of the MH17 flight over eastern Ukraine and observes the issues with Poland’s coal industry.
  • Geocurrents’ Martin Lewis calls for American military intervention to protect the Yezidis from genocide.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the plight of the Yezidi, examines the undermining of liberal Zionism, wonders how Russian relations with Southeast Asia will evolve, and after noting the sympathy of some Americans on the left for Russia analyses the consequences of a Russian-Ukrainian war.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if Russia’s food import ban is a sign of a shift to a cold war mentality, notes the collapse of the Ukrainian economy, wonders about the strategy of Hamas, and comments on the weakness of the economy of Ghana.
  • The New APPS Blog comments on the implications of the firing of American academic Steven Salaita for his blog posts.
  • The Pagan Prattle looks at allegations of extensive coverups of pedophilia in the United Kingdom.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes the decreasing dynamism of the ageing Australia economy.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer doesn’t think there’s much of a crisis in Argentina following the debt default, notes ridiculous American efforts to undermine Cuba that just hurt Cubans, examines implications of energy reform and property rights in Mexico, has a good strategy shared with other for dealing with the Islamic State.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little contends with Tyler Cowen’s arguments about changing global inequality, and studies the use of mechanisms in international relations theory.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy touches upon Palestine’s case at the ICC against Israel, looks at Argentina’s debt default, and wonders if Internet domain names are property.
  • Window on Eurasia has a huge set of links, pointing to the rivalry of Russian Jewish organizations in newly-acquired Crimea, looking at Ukrainian ethnic issues in Russia, suggests that the Donbas war is alienating many Ukrainians in the east from Russia, notes Islamization in Central Asia, suggests that Russia under sanctions could become as isolated as the former SOviet Union, suggests Ukrainian refugees are being settled in non-Russian republics, wonders if Ukraine and Georgia and Moldova will join Turkey as being perennial EU candidates, suggests that Belarusians are divided and claims that Belarusian national identity is challenging Russian influence, looks at the spread of Ukrainian nationalism among Russophones, looks at the consequences of Kurdish independence for the South Caucasus, and notes that one-tenth of young Russians are from the North Caucasus or descend from the region.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes that some Ukrainian astronomers have insulted Putin by naming a star after him.
  • blogTO notes on the park front that the bandmembers of Rush will be honoured with a park in their own name in their own neighbourhood, and turns to the discussion about the
  • Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly asks readers if they can describe their job in five words.
  • Joe. My. God. links to a new Australian study suggesting the children of same-sex couples might turn out better than the children of traditional family structures.
  • Language Hat links to an interesting speculation of Victor Mair’s, to the effect that all languages include at least a thousand basic concepts, suggesting this might reflect something about the human mind.
  • Language Log notes garbled language about the greenhouse effect on Earth and Mars.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that, based on a study, the Chinese language has the lowest percentage of borrowed words of any major language.
  • Personal Reflection’s Jim Belshaw notes, as a white Australian, problems with being involved in the struggles of Aborigines.
  • Savage Minds notes the use of archeology in Israel to justify the displacement of Palestinians.
  • Towleroad examines how a picture of a gay male couple with their newborn child has gone viral.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy’s Will Baude shared the voices of some Americans critical of the Declaration of Independence. (Frederick Douglass’ issues were well-founded.)
  • Window on Eurasia notes the exile of another Crimean Tatar from his Russian-annexed homeland and observes a call for less education in languages other than Russian that might hit worldly Russians as badly as it would ethnic minorities.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Discover‘s Collideascape notes that, even as agricultural land is falling worldwide, the productivity of this land is increasing even more sharply.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper examining the extent to which saline water might make cooler planets better for live, and to another paper suggesting that planetary magnetic fields are so importance for life (and oxygen levels) that brief reversals in the history of Earth have led to mass extinctions.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes a Ukrainian report that the country’s military has captured a Russian tank.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that vehemently anti-gay Minnesota archbishop John Nienstadt is being investigated for allegedly having sexual relationships with men.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that, despite economic collapse, there are some jobs (like low-paying fieldwork) that Portuguese just won’t do.
  • The New APPS Blog’s Gordon Hull notes the gender inequity involved in the recent Hobby Lobby ruling in the United States.
  • pollotenchegg maps the slow decline of Ukraine’s Jewish population in the post-1945 era.
  • Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle writes eloquently about his connections to and love of Lake Erie.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs links to a cartographic examination of the time spent by French television news examining different areas of the world.
  • Towleroad notes a faux apology made by the Israeli education minister after attacking gay families.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy’s Jonathan Adler notes the future of contraception coverage under Obamacare.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on fears that Crimean Tatar organizations will soon suffer a Russian crackdown, and suggests that the West should reconsider its policies on Belarus to encourage that country to diversify beyond Russia.
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