A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘lithuania

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Big Picture shares pictures of the ongoing confusion and human tragedy surrounding the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes preliminary results for the hunt of exoplanets around very cool stars.
  • The Dragon’s Tales, meanwhile, observes that the red-coloured formation on Europa’s icy surface seem to be produced by internal events.
  • Far Outliers notes that Japan provided naval protection to Australia during the First World War, causing the Australians no small amount of alarm at their vulnerability.
  • A Fistful of Euros’ Alex Harrowell notes the personal and ideological connection between now-separate Crimea and Transnistria.
  • At The Frailest Thing, Michael Sacasas talks about how the phenomenon of people disconnecting from the online world can evoke the Bakhtinian carnival, and how it also might not be enough.
  • Geocurrents notes that, in various referenda, Switzerland’s Francophone cantons are consistently more open (to immigrants, to the European Union) than others.)
  • Joe. My. God. observes that for the first time since the epidemic hit, HIV/AIDS has stopped being one of the top ten causes of death in New York City.
  • Ukrainian demographics blogger pollotenchegg shares the results of recent detailed polling of Crimea’s population, on everything from political views or language usage.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that markets are reacting to Russia’s actions, though whether it’s Crimea alone or broader fears about a Ukrainian war is open to question.
  • Torontoist explains to its readership what co-op apartments actually are, in the course of an explanation that Jack Layton and Olivia Chow were not living in subsidized apartments.
  • Towleroad celebrates the classic TV series Golden Girls.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russian relations with Lithuania are also deteriorating.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • io9 links to a map showing the Milky Way Galaxy’s location in nearer intergalactic space.
  • The Big Picture has pictures from the Sochi Paralympics.
  • blogTO shares an array of pictures from Toronto in the 1980s.
  • D-Brief notes the recent finding that star HR 5171A is one of the largest stars discovered, a massive yellow hypergiant visible to the naked eye despite being twenty thousand light-years away.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes recent studies suggesting that M-class red dwarfs are almost guaranteed to have planets.
  • Eastern Approaches argues that the lawsuits of Serbia and Croatia posed against each other on charges of genocide at the International Court of Justice will do little but cause harm.
  • Far Outliers explores how Australian colonists in the late 19th century feared German ambitions in New Guinea.
  • The Financial Times World blog suggests that, in its mendacity, Russia is behaving in Crimea much as the Soviet Union did in Lithuania in 1990.
  • Geocurrents notes that the Belarusian language seems to be nearing extinction, displaced by Russian in Belarus (and Polish to some extent, too).
  • Joe. My. God. notes the protests of tens of thousands of Orthodox Jews in New York City against mandatory conscription laws in Israel that would see their co-sectarians do service.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that, in pre-Israeli Palestine, local Arabs wanted to be part of a greater Syria.</li?
  • Otto Pohl notes the connections of Crimean Tatars to a wider Turkic world and their fear that a Russian Crimea might see their persecution.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that Venezuela has attacked Panama in retaliation for a vote against it by confiscating the assets of its companies there. In turn, Panama has promised to reveal the banking accounts of Venezuelan officials in Panama.
  • John Scalzi of Whatever is unimpressed with the cultic adoration of Robert Heinlein’s novels by some science fiction fans.

[NEWS] Some Monday links

  • From Google Plus, Brian Koberlein notes that an examination of IRAS infrared astronomical data suggests that our solar system has no very large companions.
  • The Globe and Mail notes that Russian may close down inter-country adoptions with Canada because of our recognition of same-sex marriages and adoption.
  • Business Week observes that China is going to introduce an economic census to try to come up with reliable statistics.
  • The Star is one paper carrying the report that Gary Shteyngart said subsidy-using Canadian writers aren’t risk-taking.
  • In a sad coda, David Pickton–brother of serial killer Robert Pickton–denies knowledge of the crimes, which occurred on the family property both brothers lived on.
  • These pictures of cat armour are amazing.
  • Der Spiegel‘s English-language edition notes the continuing recovery of Iceland from its economic crash.
  • Gothamist reports that New York City’s MTA will be killing its Metrocard in favour of better technologies. Oh, TTC!
  • Open Democracy reports on how residents of the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad, surrounded by European Union member-states Poland and Lithuania, are starting to Europeanize.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the thinking of Martin Rees and Freeman Dyson on the diaspora of life beyond Earth, noting that it’s going to require as much adaptation to new environments as it will (would?) the adaptation of existing environments.
  • D-Brief notes theory about planetary system formation suggesting that suggestive gaps in protoplanetary discs of gas and dust don’t necessarily reveal planets.
  • The Dragon’s Tales’ Will Baird links to the recent paper suggesting that tide-locked red dwarf planets are much more likely to be habitable than previously thought.
  • Geocurrents analyses the possibility that Iran might be divided between a conservative Persian-speaking core and reformist peripheries.
  • GNXP’s Razib Khan notes evidence from Ethiopia suggesting that there has been immigration into Africa as well out of the continent.
  • Registan describes a Chinese copper mining project in Afghanistan that never quire took off.
  • Savage Minds’ Rex reviews William McNeill’s biography of historian Arnold J. Toynbee.
  • Strange Maps maps the leading causes of death by continent.
  • Supernova Condensate describes the possibility of life-supporting environments on Europa, not only in the subsurface ocean but in lakes located in the ice crust.
  • Window on Eurasia quotes a Tatar nationalist who argues that Tatarstan can be to Russia what Lithuania was to the former Soviet Union, i.e. the unit which breaks the country apart.

[LINK] “Lithuanian identity and the riddle of General Lucjan Želigowski”

The English-language edition of Lithuanian news portal 15min.lt features an interview with Lithuanian historian Šarūnas Liekis, examining the controversial person of Polish general Lucjan Želigowski. In 1920, Želigowski staged a coup that led to the annexation of Vilnius–now the Lithuanian capital, at the time part of a largely Polish-populated region–into Second Republic Poland. Liekis suggests that Želigowski was acting as a Lithuanian–the only dispute related to questions of identity. Was Lithuania the nation-state of the ethnic Lithuanians, or was Lithuania inheritor of the multiethnic (and largely Polish-speaking) Grand Duchy of Lithuania federated with Poland?

- Želigowski’s name still sounds odious to Lithuanian ears, since it is associated with the loss of Vilnius in 1920. Who is this man and what was his connection to Lithuania?

- Želigowski’s was an old family coming from Ashmyany (currently part of Belarus), its roots go back to the 16th century. An entry from 1623 in Lithuanian chronicles reads: “Jakob Želigowski from Kimbor estate came with a horse, armour, helmet, and harquebus.”

Želigowski’s father Gustav, brothers Jan and Juzef participated in the 1863-1864 uprising. His uncle Edvard Želigowski was arrested for joining the Dalevski brothers’ patriotic youth group in Lithuania – the tsar had outlawed the organization and persecuted its members.

In other words, Želigowski did not come out of the blue, he was not from Silesia, Berlin, or Stockholm – he came from here. His fate is comparable to that of thousands of descendants of Polish and Lithuanian nobility who had to choose one or the other nationality in modern times.

Želigowski was a professional military officer at the tsar’s army. He studied military sciences in a Junker school in Riga, graduated in 1888, and later continued his service in the tsar’s army. He chose the military to escape poverty.

He participate in the Russo-Japanese war and World War One. He was already leading a division in 1917. He was on the White side in Russian civil war, fought in Southern Russia and Crimea. After that he led the 4th Polish rifle regiment, formed of soldiers that came from territories of the former Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, crossed Romania and joined Poland’s army. He fought in Ukraine with the Polish regiment.

[. . .]

One could say that younger officers, born around 1890, tended to choose service in the Lithuanian army. Older ones chose Poland because their formative years, their socialization happened in a Polophone culture, within the ideology of Lithuanian-Polish nobility. They thought it was natural to choose Poland rather than the new non-historic ethnic Lithuania built on the peasant culture.

Another example – the Inavauskai brothers who chose different Belarusian, Polish, and Lithuanian nationalities. Tadas Ivanauskas, Lithuanian biologist who set up a zoology museum in Kaunas, had a son, Jerzy, who fought with the Armia Krajowa during World War Two.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 17, 2013 at 7:23 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Centauri Dreams’ Paul Gilster writes about the likely abundance of Earth-like planets in Earth-like orbits.
  • Daniel Drezner writes (1, 2) about how ad hoc coalitions of world powers are able to deal relatively decisively in some matters of global affairs.
  • At The Dragon’s Tales, Will Baird notes that Titan’s hydrocarbon lakes appear to have floating ice.
  • Eastern Approaches notes the toxicity that disputes over war memorials in the Balkans, noting an Albanian memorial in southern Serbia.
  • False Steps’ Paul Drye notes one rocket technology that, if adequately developed, could have let the Soviet Union reach the moon.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alexander Harrowell notes that the United States does not want the United Kingdom to leave the European Union.
  • Marginal Revolution asks questions about the geographical, historical, and other factors that let free cities survive.
  • The Signal’s Bill LeFurgy compares digital archivists’ work to that of paleontologists. Nice analogy.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alexander Harrowell notes that conservative British pundits in the United States are a much smaller and more unrepresentative minority than is often believed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Soviet-era apologia for the deadly assault on the Vilnius radio station in 1991 is being used in modern Russia.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • BlogTO notes plans by the City of Toronto to refurbish Front Street.
  • Centauri Dreams’ Paul Gilster points to astronomers who think current techniques might, just barely, be able to identify massive moons orbiting exoplanets–the more massive and hotter the moon the better, of course.
  • Eastern Approaches observes the popularity, in Poland, of conspiracy theories surrounding the 2010 crash of the plane carrying Polish president Lech Kaczyński and 95 other VIPs in Smolensk.
  • Geocurrents notes that Lithuania’s electorate has voted massively against building a new nuclear power plant to replace the recently-closed Ignalina plant.
  • GNXP’s Razib Khan makes mention of the surprising fact that the near-totality of the wilderness present in North America four centuries ago at the beginning of European colonization is back.
  • Language Hat comments on the etymology and usage of Rus, as ethnonym and political term.
  • Language Log’s Victor Mair examines the origins and usage of the terms “Sinophone” and “Sinosphere.”</a
  • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, Robert Farley points out that with the single exception of North Korea, East Asia is actually reasonably demilitarized by the standards of the Cold War powers.
  • The Numerati’s Stephen Baker praises Nate Silver and his methods of statistical analysis: they don’t make use of unquantifiable and misleading sentiments, they just make use very accurate statistical methods and models.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • BlogTO notes plans by the City of Toronto to refurbish Front Street.
  • Centauri Dreams’ Paul Gilster points to astronomers who think current techniques might, just barely, be able to identify massive moons orbiting exoplanets–the more massive and hotter the moon the better, of course.
  • Eastern Approaches observes the popularity, in Poland, of conspiracy theories surrounding the 2010 crash of the plane carrying Polish president Lech Kaczyński and 95 other VIPs in Smolensk.
  • Geocurrents notes that Lithuania’s electorate has voted massively against building a new nuclear power plant to replace the recently-closed Ignalina plant.
  • GNXP’s Razib Khan makes mention of the surprising fact that the near-totality of the wilderness present in North America four centuries ago at the beginning of European colonization is back.
  • Language Hat comments on the etymology and usage of Rus, as ethnonym and political term.
  • Language Log’s Victor Mair examines the origins and usage of the terms “Sinophone” and “Sinosphere.”</a
  • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, Robert Farley points out that with the single exception of North Korea, East Asia is actually reasonably demilitarized by the standards of the Cold War powers.
  • The Numerati’s Stephen Baker praises Nate Silver and his methods of statistical analysis: they don’t make use of unquantifiable and misleading sentiments, they just make use very accurate statistical methods and models.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • BlogTO notes plans by the City of Toronto to refurbish Front Street.
  • Centauri Dreams’ Paul Gilster points to astronomers who think current techniques might, just barely, be able to identify massive moons orbiting exoplanets–the more massive and hotter the moon the better, of course.
  • Eastern Approaches observes the popularity, in Poland, of conspiracy theories surrounding the 2010 crash of the plane carrying Polish president Lech Kaczyński and 95 other VIPs in Smolensk.
  • Geocurrents notes that Lithuania’s electorate has voted massively against building a new nuclear power plant to replace the recently-closed Ignalina plant.
  • GNXP’s Razib Khan makes mention of the surprising fact that the near-totality of the wilderness present in North America four centuries ago at the beginning of European colonization is back.
  • Language Hat comments on the etymology and usage of Rus, as ethnonym and political term.
  • Language Log’s Victor Mair examines the origins and usage of the terms “Sinophone” and “Sinosphere.”</a
  • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, Robert Farley points out that with the single exception of North Korea, East Asia is actually reasonably demilitarized by the standards of the Cold War powers.
  • The Numerati’s Stephen Baker praises Nate Silver and his methods of statistical analysis: they don’t make use of unquantifiable and misleading sentiments, they just make use very accurate statistical methods and models.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • At Beyond the Beyond, Bruce Sterling reposts some post-modernist revolutionary rhetoric from Québec’s ongoing student protests.
  • Centauri Dreams’ Paul Gilster writes about planet HD 189733b, a gas giant that orbits its star 63 light years away so closely that it’s literally evaporating.
  • Geocurrents notes that recent rioting in Zanzibar, connected to the constitutional status of that autonomous island within Tanzania, may harm the island’s lucrative tourism trade.
  • Language Hat starts a discussion on the language environment of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, which despite its origins among the Baltic-speakers of the modern republic was increasingly dominated by Polish-speaking Slavs of one denomination or another.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money’s Eric Loomis blogs about the collapse of Appalachia’s coal industry, undermined by cheaper competition and the exhaustion of local resources, making things much for the poor locals.
  • The Naked Anthropologist Laura Agustín examines sex work from a Marxist perspective.
  • Registan’s Joshua Foust is quite right to note that Pakistan’s prosecution fo Dr. Shakil Afridi for aiding the CIA’s location of Osama bin Laden augurs a breakdown in Pakistan’s relations with the West once NATO withdraws from Afghanistan.
  • Savage Minds’ Levi Jacobs posts a summary of a recent ethnographic investigation of Occupy Denver, and what futures are possible for the Occupy mvoement and its successors.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little is skeptical about the consequences of a recent conference concerned with triggering rebirth in Michgian.
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