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Posts Tagged ‘poland

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • blogTO shares a visual history of the Toronto Islands. (I really will have to get there this year.)
  • At Broadside Blog, Caitlin Kelly draws lessons from the experience of a journalist who literally overworked himself to death. When should people note their limits?
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that close-orbiting hot Neptune GJ 436b, even with its comet-like tail produced by heating from its sun, isn’t going to lose its atmosphere.
  • Eastern Approaches notes that Poland’s Donald Tusk is presiding over new military spending inspired by the Ukrainian crisis.
  • The Financial Times‘ The World blog and Eastern Approaches both deal with the international consequences of ongoing Russian involvement in eastern Ukraine, the former calling for broad sanctions.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if the Russian-majority city of Narva in northeastern Estonia will be the next target of Russia.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer discusses the implication of Russian gas price increases for Ukraine.
  • Torontoist notes the impact of CBC’s announced job cuts.
  • Towleroad links to a teaser for the new HBO movie version of The Lonely Heart and reports on Barbra Streisand’s explanation as to why she couldn’t get the movie made.
  • Une heure de peine’s Denis Colombi writes (in French) about the sociology of working hours in France and among the French.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that rising xenophobia in Russia is alienating many non-Russians and reports on one Russia who argues that there isn’t a necessary conflict between liberalism and imperialism.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • D-Brief shares the news that scientists think that Saturn’s moon Enceladus has a subsurface ocean in its southern polar region.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a remarkable paper claiming that red dwarf stars are exceptionally likely to have a planet in their circumstellar habitable zones.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to an other paper on Mars suggesting that world was never very hot, even in its youth.
  • Eastern Approaches suggests that Poland is approaching the point of relative energy-independence from Russia.
  • The Financial Times The World blog reports on the failure of a US-subsidized Cuban social networking system.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas links to an account of an 1895 conversation between Paul Valéry and a Chinese friend suggesting that Chinese may have had different perspectives on technology than Westerners.
  • Geocurrents’ Martin Lewis notes Ukrainian regionalism, observing that the Europe-leaning west/centre region has inside it a strongly nationalist Galicia and a regionalist Ruthene-leaning Transcarpathia.
  • Joe. My. God. points to the story of a Floridian sex offender who tried to burn down the home of a lesbian couple and their eight children just because.
  • Personal Reflection’s Jim Belshaw explores the origin of the word “bogey” in Australian English to mean swimming hole.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Bruce Betts reports on the progress made in the search for planets at Alpha Centauri. (So far, no evidence for Alpha Centauri Bb, but then the technology isn’t sensitive enough to confirm that world’s existence.)
  • Towleroad reports on the controversy surrounding the recent resignation of former Mozilla Brandon Eich, Andrew Sullivan aligning with left-wingers and Michael Signorile making the point that Eich’s donations to people like Pat Buchanan tipped things over.
  • Window on Eurasia comments on the successful program of the Kazakhstani government to settle ethnic Kazakhs in the once-Russian-majority north of the country so as to prevent a secession.

[NEWS] Some Friday links

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  • Al Ahram notes that, as Ukraine is starting to turn towards the European Union, Russia is doubling down on its Eurasian Union project.
  • Al Jazeera notes that the Russian Orthodox Church is more skeptical of the costs of Crimea’s annexation than the Russian state, for fear of losing followers in Ukraine.
  • The Atlantic Cities commemorated the brief return of Major League Baseball to Montréal a decade after the Expos’ death with a Toronto Blue Jays away game, shares pictures of London’s first cat cafe, and maps imbalances in supply and demand in New York City’s popular but troubled bike share program.
  • Bloomberg notes how IKEA’s dreams for expansion in Ukraine were undermined by corruption.
  • Bloomberg BusinessWeek chronicles falling Japanese stock prices, warns that Russia is becoming a junior partner of China, and notes the threats facing Ukrainian agriculture.
  • CNET examines the story behind the iconic Windows XP photo “Bliss”.
  • Global Voices Online hints, by way of a recent quitting, that Ukrainians might be disenchanted with Russian-owned Livejournal.
  • The Guardian notes that the Australian city of Darwin is a military garrison par excellence, and observes that Bulgaria has derived some benefit from the Greek economic collapse as businesses have migrated north.
  • MacLean’s suggests that Ukraine can be anchored ittno the West if it can experience Polish-style prosperity.
  • National Geographic News takes another look at the proposed Nicaragua Canal project.
  • Radio Free Europe notes that a Russian plan to institute fast-tract citizenship procedures for professionals has sparked fears of brain drain in Central Asia, observes the effects that currency devaluation has had on immigrants in Kazakhstan, and comments that Afghanistan’s support for Russia’s annexation of Crimea has much to do with Afghanistan’s long-standing irredentism aimed at Pakistan.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly makes a case about the benefits of radical honesty.
  • At the Buffer, Belle Beth Cooper describes how she has streamlined her writing style.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that China’s space station isn’t doing much.
  • Eastern Approaches observes the continuing popularity of Polish populist Lech Kaczynski.
  • The Financial Times‘ The World blog notes the vulnerable popularity of UKIP’s Nigel Farage.
  • Geocurrents’ Asya Perelstvaig comments on the entry of Jewish businessman Vadim Rabinovich into the Ukrainian presidential contest.
  • Joe. My. God. is unconvinced by the suggestion that marriage equality means the end of gay bars.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money’s Erik Loomis speculates about the responsibility of American consumers for air pollution in exporting Asia.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Constantine Tsang describes evidence for volcanism on Venus.
  • Savage Minds interviews one Laura Forlano on the intersections between anthropology and design.
  • Towleroad mourns the death of godfather of house music Frankie Knuckles.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • 3 Quarks Daily’s Omar Ali warns that ongoing violence against Shia in Pakistan threatens to destroy the country and destabilize the whole region.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about her week-long vacation in Nicaragua.
  • blogTO shares vintage photos of Spadina Avenue.
  • Centauri Dreams’ notes that the surface of Titan’s Ligeia Mare is apparently completely still.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to different papers, one suggesting that terrestrial planets orbiting red dwarfs are less likely to enter runaway ice ages, another further examining the concept of superhabitable worlds.
  • Eastern Approaches takes a look at the continuing progress made by Poland’s modernizing agricultural sector.
  • Geocurrents examines the geopolitical complexities of Ukraine and its relationship with Russia.
  • The New APPS Blog notes research suggesting that Internet trolls actually are problematic people in real life.
  • The Transit Toronto Blog notes that a vintage streetcar will be giving free rides on Kingston Road on Saturday the 29th of this month.
  • Torontoist provides an overview of the concept of co-op housing.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that, whatever else it was, the Russian conquest of Crimea was at least almost bloodless.
  • Window on Eurasia warns of unrest among the Tatars of Tatarstan.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Centauri Dreams’ Paul Gilster comments upon Brian Stableford’s argument that modern science fiction traces its origins to 19th century France.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a new study suggesting that 0.5% of G dwarf stars and 0.8% of K dwarf stars have very close-orbiting planets.
  • At Eastern Approaches, Joe’s Biden’s reassurance to Poland that NATO would defend Polish frontiers in the case of conflict is noted.
  • Far Outliers observes that, at the beginning of the Second World War in the Pacific, Australian defenses in Melanesia were quite weak, additionally commenting on the first Japanese naval deployment south of the equator.
  • The Financial Times‘ World blog notes that, while the Cypriot economy is doing less badly than predicting, the ongoing dependence on Russia is a problem.
  • Language Log’s Victor Mair is critical of a new system for learning Chinese script.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen observes, after the New York Times, that the economy of South Ossetia five years after the Georgian war isn’t doing very well.
  • Open the Future’s Jamais Cascio, reacting to the Crimean crisis, doesn’t think much of futurological methods which keep making errors.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes Ukraine’s exceptional economic dependence on Russia.
  • Visiting Toronto, Peter Rukavina quite likes the inexpensive integration of the TTC into Pearson International Airport.
  • Towleroad notes that Susanna Atanus, a Republican congressional candidate in Illinois who said autism was God’s punishment for same-sex marriage, won the party primary.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy’s Eugene Kontrovich observes the difficult situation of France, which has contracted to sell helicopter carriers to Russia.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever commemorates twenty years of his online presence.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the Russian annexation of Crimea is accelerating the disintegration of the post-Soviet space and warns of a crackdown on Russian civil society.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • io9 links to an online version of a 1984 text game, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.
  • After disproving the existence of Tyche, Centauri Dreams meditates on the rich data provided on the interstellar neighbourhood by the WISE infrared telescope.
  • The Dragon’s Tales maps the distribution of Russian and Ukrainian military forces.
  • Eastern Approaches visits the western Ukrainian village of Chervone, a community dependent on remittances from guest workers that finds itself getting along increasingly well with Poland and Poles. (Russia and Russians, not so much.)
  • Joe. My. God. notes that seven billionaires on Forbes’ famed list are openly gay.
  • Language Log has issues with the reported sensitivity of the new test for Alzheimer’s.
  • Marginal Revolution follows up on Edward Hugh’s suggestion that all Abenomics in Japan has been doing is boosting the Japanese trade deficit.
  • Livejournal’s pollotenchegg maps the demographics of Ukraine. Despite a significant recent improvements, the west and cities in the center of the country are the only ones avoiding population shrinkage.
  • Savage Minds features a post from anthropologist Robin Bernstein talking about how she likes grant writing.
  • Strange Maps notes a Dutch doctoral thesis arguing that the portolan charts of the early modern period are much too good to have been done in the medieval period. Are they legacies of Greco-Roman civilization?
  • Towleroad notes the testimony of a gay singer-songwriter Justin Utley before a state committee in Utah as to the persecution he has experienced on account of his sexual orientation.
  • Transit Toronto’s Robert McKenzie notes the expansion of parking at the Pickering GO station.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell complaints that his Firefox is crashing repeatedly and with frequency aren’t things I’ve experienced yet, fortunately.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes that some astronomers have come up with methods for measuring the densities of the atmospheres of difference exoplanets.
  • Crooked Timber’s Chris Bertram thinks that the state of the migration debate in the United Kingdom is grim, given what he thinks is the toughness of even a liberal proposal.
  • Eastern Approaches notes that the Czech Republic and Slovakia aren’t as vocal in their support of Ukraine against Russia as Poland.
  • At the Everyday Sociology Blog, Karen Sternheimer explores the role of justifications and excuses in culture.
  • Far Outliers notes that, on the eve of the First World War, Germany lacked settler colonies.
  • The Financial Times‘ World blog worries that Croatia might not be able to make effective use of European Union funds.
  • Language Hat notes that Western-style romance novels were popular samizdat in the Soviet Union.
  • Language Log’s Victor Mair argues that, between influence from foreign languages and technology, the Chinese language is evolving rapidly.
  • Marginal Revolution notes an argument that state-formation in Europe might have been driven by economics not military affairs.
  • Towleroad notes the recent progressive court ruling on gay sex in Lebanon.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Beyond the Numbers suggests that talk of an African demographic dividend may be overstated, in that the young cohorts need–among other things–education.
  • Crooked Timber’s Chris Bertram talks about the ethics of open versus closed borders, suggesting that the latter is only acceptable if there actually are other ways to help.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes exoplanet WTS-2 b, a hot Jupiter set to spiral into its orange dwarf sun in 40 milion years.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that the ancestors of the Americas’ indigenous populations apparently hung out in Beringia for ten thousand years before moving south, observes that Moldovans now have visa-less travel rights to the European Union, and comments on the still unknown composition of Mars’ moons Phobos and Deimos.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Edward Hugh argues that Abenomics in Japan is turning out to be a huge, expensive, mess.
  • Language Hat observes that many Soviets learned Polish in order to partake in the freer and more cosmopolitan literature of Poland.
  • Language Log notes a new Chinese word for nerd.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that many religious conservatives who oppose same-sex marriage just don’t get it.
  • Marginal Revolution observes that China is now India’s largest trading partner.
  • Savage Minds features a guest post from anthropologist Douglas La Rose talking about debt.
  • Torontoist notes Doug Ford’s media tour against police cheif Bill Blair.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy’s Ilya Somin argues that migration should be talked about in light of the needs of immigrants, too.

[NEWS] Some Friday links

  • National Geographic notes the cultural and political revival of the Nubians, an ethnic minority originally from far southern Egypt displaced by the flooding caused by the Nasser Dam.
  • thenews.pl claims that a half-million Poles emigrated last year, most to the United Kingdom and Germany.
  • The Havana Times wonders why, after the reforms of recent years, so many Cubans want to leave. (I think that the wonder is tongue-in-cheek.)
  • thejournal.ie notes that, for all its woes, Ireland is a desirable destination for young Venezuelans.
  • NASA’s press release on the Ganymede survey is great.
  • Al-Jazeera notes that many male Syrian refugees in Lebanon are turning to prostitution to make ends meet.
  • The BBC notes that dredging won’t necessarily do anything to stop severe flooding in the United Kingdom.
  • The Global Post provides background into Nigeria’s impending ascent to largest economy in Africa, based on everything from better measurement in Nigeria to South African stagnation.
  • The Wall Street Journal‘s Emerging Europe blog traces much Ukrainian anger to its underperformance economically since 1991, relative to Poland and Russia and the Baltic States.
  • The South China Morning Post contrasts and compares income in Singapore and Hong Kong, arguing Singaporean figures are inflated by foreign investment.
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