A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘religion

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • blogTO notes the continuing problems of Toronto’s food truck project.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes the differences between transit and radial velocity detection methods for planets and the relative advantages for detecting planets in stellar habitable zones, and links to a paper describing how hot Jupiters can become super-Earths.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the changing strategic situation of Australia.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that most of IKEA’s photo shoots are actually computer-assembled from stock imagery.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the impending retirement of Berlin’s gay mayor Klaus Wowereit.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that anti-Obamacare red states are hurting their poor citizens.
  • New APPS Blog considers the question of what makes happy children.
  • Towleroad notes anti-gay persecution by Lebanese police and quotes the mayor of Kazakhstan’s capital city talking badly about non-heterosexuals.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the emigration of Kazakhs and even Uighurs from Xinjiang to Kazakhstan, touches upon Western disillusionment with Russia, notes the possible impending defection of most of the Ukrainian churches of the Russian Orthodox Church to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, and reports on the relocation of a Ukrainian factory to Russia.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • 3 Quarks Daily considers the ethics of suicide.
  • Slate‘s Atlas Obscura blog shares photos of Second World War relics in Alaska’s Aleutian islands.
  • The Big Picture shares images of Australia’s doll hospital.
  • blogTO lists five things Toronto could learn from New York City.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes China’s growing presence in Latin America and observes that apes and hmans share the same kind of empathy.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the coming out of an Irish beauty queen.
  • Marginal Revolution expects inequality to start growing in New Zealand.
  • Discover‘s Out There looks forward to the new age of exploration of Pluto and the rest of the Kuiper belt.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares beautiful photo mosaics of Neptune from Voyager 2.
  • The Search examines in an interview the use of a hundred million photo dataset from Flickr for research.
  • Torontoist notes a mayoral debate on Toronto heritage preservation.
  • Towleroad observes that a pro-GLBT advertisement won’t air on Lithuanian television because of restrictive legislation.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Ukrainian refugees are being resettled in the North Caucasus to bolster Slav numbers and predicts the quiet decline of the Russian Orthodox Church in Ukraine.

[NEWS] Some Sunday links

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  • Al Jazeera notes India’s concern about the possible domination of BRICS institutions by China, and looks at controversies surrounding gender in the French education system.
  • BusinessWeek notes that some Chinese have taken to growing their own food in their apartments to avoid contaminated produce, and comments on the troubles of hookah bars in Russia.
  • CBC notes problems for Canadian pot tourists in the United States.
  • The Economist observes that relations between China and Vietnam are quite poor.
  • Foreign Policy comments on African skepticism about free trade agreements with rich countries and analyses the spectre of “Novorossiya” in Ukraine.
  • MacLean’s reports how seven different foriegn newspapers covered Canadian confederation in 1867.
  • National Geographic writes about the Panana Canal’s Lake Gatun.
  • The New Yorker argues that Iraq and Syria each have long histories.
  • Open Democracy comments on China’s speculative and opportunistic responses to the Crimean crisis and observes that Uzbekistan’s government prefers to stay out of regional trade agreements so to strengthen its government.
  • Transitions Online u>compares corruption in Bulgaria to that of Italy and notes the rebirth of the wine industry in Kazakhstan.
  • Wired examines the causes of the Ebola outbreak, looks at analyses of the networked structure of Jewish religious texts, and examines vintage space station designs.

[LINK] “Sierra Leone’s 365 Ebola deaths traced back to one healer”

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Frankie Taggart’s AFP article conveys terribly sad news. From such small seeds do such terrible catastrophes grow.

It has laid waste to the tribal chiefdoms of Sierra Leone, leaving hundreds dead, but the Ebola crisis began with just one healer’s claims to special powers.

The outbreak need never have spread from Guinea, health officials revealed to AFP, except for a herbalist in the remote eastern border village of Sokoma.

“She was claiming to have powers to heal Ebola. Cases from Guinea were crossing into Sierra Leone for treatment,” Mohamed Vandi, the top medical official in the hard-hit district of Kenema, told AFP.

“She got infected and died. During her funeral, women around the other towns got infected.”

[. . .]

The herbalist’s mourners fanned out across the rolling hills of the Kissi tribal chiefdoms, starting a chain reaction of infections, deaths, funerals and more infections.

A worrying outbreak turned into a major epidemic when the virus finally hit Kenema city on June 17.

Written by Randy McDonald

August 21, 2014 at 7:52 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Crooked Timber’s Daniel Davies writes about the end of his career as a financial analyst.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper discussing the brown dwarfs of 25 Orionis.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper suggesting that Uranus’ moon system is still evolving, with the moon Cupid being doomed in a relatively short timescale. It also wonders if North Korea is exporting rare earths through China.
  • Far Outliers notes the Ainu legacy in placenames in Japanese-settled Hokkaido.
  • Languages of the World’s Asya Perelstvaig examines the complexities surrounding language and dialect and nationality in the Serbo-Croatian speech community in the former Yugoslavia.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes the terribly high death rate among Europeans in colonial Indonesia, and how drink was used to put things off.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog examines the prevalence of sex-selective abortion in Armenia.
  • Torontoist notes Rob Ford’s many lies and/or incomprehensions about Toronto’s fiscal realities.
  • Towleroad suggests that one way to regularize HIV testing would be to integrate it with dentistry appointments.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a water dispute on the Russian-Azerbaijan border and argues that the election of a pro-Russian cleric to the head of the Ukrainian section of the Russian Orthodox Church is dooming that church to decline.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • blogTO shares a new transit map that combines streetcar and subway routes.
  • Crooked Timber’s Chris Bertram notes, in light of the ongoing massacres of Iraq and the desperate plight of a party of Afghanistani Sikhs smuggled into the United Kingdom, that persecution combines with general bars on refugees to force people-smuggling.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining how planetesimals form.
  • A Fistful of Euros’ Edward Hugh writes about the imminent debt catastrophe facing the Italian economy, and Marginal Revolution picks up on it.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas wonders how some people get the sense that the world is technophobic.
  • Language Log examines how Muslims around the world learn to read the Qu’ran in Arabic. Fascinating comments.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes Russia’s new problems in the Pacific Rim and notes the unseemly pro-Russian propaganda of The Nation.
  • More Words, Deeper Hole’s James Nicoll reviews the Niven/Pournelle collaboration Lucifer’s Hammer and notes it a competent distillation of the fears of the mid-1970s.
  • The New APPS Blog looks at a study examining alloparenting, the raising of a child in part or in whole by a non-parent, and notes that the most successful of these societies don’t teach their children fear of the outside world.
  • Peter Rukavina shares an old Prince Edward Island news article commenting on how celebrations of Confederation were postponed by the outbreak of the First World War.
  • Torontoist tells the story of Toronto astronomer and popularizer Dr. Helen Sawyer Hogg.
  • Towleroad celebrates the recent birthday of gay icon Madonna.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at the controversies of Michael Brown and Steven Salaita.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that the Putin who annexed Crimea can be foudn in the Putin who tried to cover up the Kursk submarine disaster in 2000, and notes the desire of Chechnya’s dictator to have North Caucasians serve in the Russian military as conscripts.

[NEWS] Some Saturday links

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  • Al Jazeera America argues that depending on cars will hurt Newark’s urban renaissance, notes the emerging Indian-Israeli alliance and the import of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in sectarian communities in Northern Ireland, looks at the slowly reviving film industry of Côte d’Ivoire, chronicles the human rights issues of LGB Ukrainians and of Christian sects in the Caucasus, examines the legacies of German immigration in Brazil, and looks at the shantytowns of Mongolia.
  • Al Jazeera examines Russia’s Eurasianism, notes emergent water shortages in Syria, looks at the reaction of Sephardic Jews to a new Spanish citizenship law that would give them access to Spain, and chronicles the persecution of the Ahmadiyya in Pakistan.
  • Bloomberg notes that sanctions on Russia may hurt the Greek economy, notes the collapse in wages for young people in southern Europe, and looks at Germany’s serious impending demographic issues.
  • BusinessWeek looks at Tinder’s shabby treatment of a female co-founder, examines the stagnant economy of Thailand, looks at hospitals which mine credit card data to predict their future patients.
  • CBC notes with disappearance of anonymous public WiFi in Russia, takes a look at the consequences of the shutdown of the McCain potato processing plant in Borden-Carleton, points out the ongoing collapse of a caribou herd on the Québec-Labrador border, shows the sad toll of the Air Algérie plane crash in Québec, and notes that Vancouver’s aquarium can no longer breed cetaceans.
  • Global News looks at the impact of Air Algérie’s disaster in Montreal.
  • MacLean’s suggests Canada is not immune to an American-style housing crash, argues that the Canadian job market is weaker than it appears, and reports on the claims that restrictive American immigration policies could work to the benefit of Canada.
  • National Geographic notes some surprisingly social cephalopod populations and looks at naming ceremonies for some gorillas in Rwanda.
  • NPR reports that some big data firms claim Snowden’s data release has given terrorists ideas as to how they can be quieter, and notes some Ivoirien cacao farmers who taste
  • The New York Times notes the closure of an Upper East Side restaurant priced out by rising rents.
  • Reuters observes the worsening demographics of Italy.
  • Transitions Online takes a small-scale look on the effects of emigration in Uzbekistan.
  • Universe Today looks at how some Martian canyons were formed by different water releases.
  • Xinhua notes how emigration from Portugal has become mainstream.
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