A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘space travel

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • 3 Quarks Daily considers the ethics of suicide.
  • Slate‘s Atlas Obscura blog shares photos of Second World War relics in Alaska’s Aleutian islands.
  • The Big Picture shares images of Australia’s doll hospital.
  • blogTO lists five things Toronto could learn from New York City.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes China’s growing presence in Latin America and observes that apes and hmans share the same kind of empathy.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the coming out of an Irish beauty queen.
  • Marginal Revolution expects inequality to start growing in New Zealand.
  • Discover‘s Out There looks forward to the new age of exploration of Pluto and the rest of the Kuiper belt.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares beautiful photo mosaics of Neptune from Voyager 2.
  • The Search examines in an interview the use of a hundred million photo dataset from Flickr for research.
  • Torontoist notes a mayoral debate on Toronto heritage preservation.
  • Towleroad observes that a pro-GLBT advertisement won’t air on Lithuanian television because of restrictive legislation.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Ukrainian refugees are being resettled in the North Caucasus to bolster Slav numbers and predicts the quiet decline of the Russian Orthodox Church in Ukraine.

[NEWS] Some Monday links

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  • Al Jazeera notes the likely controversies surrounding a new Chinese cartoon spotlighting an Uighur concubine of a Chinese emperor, and looks at the deeper diversity of Martha’s Vineyard.
  • Bloomberg notes the risk of Israel slumping into recession, reports on Burger King’s interest in acquiring Tim Hortons, notes that Côte d’Ivoire is still trying to sell public debt, comments on the role played by Dutch anger over the MH17 plane attacl in organizing the European Union sanctions against Russia, and describes the slim hope for upcoming Russian-Ukrainian talks.
  • CBC Prince Edward Island reports on a shocking double homicide in eastern Prince Edward Island, a shooting of a father and his son.
  • The Forward wonders who leaked an Israeli cabinet consideration of the reoccupation of Gaza.
  • An older MacLean’s report suggests that Tim Horton’s depends on low-cost imported labour to sustain an ultimately unsustainable growth strategy. A much newer one reports on the defection of another Bloc Québécois MP.
  • The Toronto Standard notes that Rob and Doug Ford were the only people on city council to vote against a new practice facility for the Toronto Raptors.
  • Universe Today notes that the ESA has selected five landing sites for the Philae comet lander, and observes that NASA’s New Horizons Pluto probe has just crossed the orbit of Neptune.
  • In the realm of photography, Wired reports on Humans of New York’s new global coverage and examines street photography in New York City.

[NEWS] Some Sunday links

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  • Al Jazeera notes India’s concern about the possible domination of BRICS institutions by China, and looks at controversies surrounding gender in the French education system.
  • BusinessWeek notes that some Chinese have taken to growing their own food in their apartments to avoid contaminated produce, and comments on the troubles of hookah bars in Russia.
  • CBC notes problems for Canadian pot tourists in the United States.
  • The Economist observes that relations between China and Vietnam are quite poor.
  • Foreign Policy comments on African skepticism about free trade agreements with rich countries and analyses the spectre of “Novorossiya” in Ukraine.
  • MacLean’s reports how seven different foriegn newspapers covered Canadian confederation in 1867.
  • National Geographic writes about the Panana Canal’s Lake Gatun.
  • The New Yorker argues that Iraq and Syria each have long histories.
  • Open Democracy comments on China’s speculative and opportunistic responses to the Crimean crisis and observes that Uzbekistan’s government prefers to stay out of regional trade agreements so to strengthen its government.
  • Transitions Online u>compares corruption in Bulgaria to that of Italy and notes the rebirth of the wine industry in Kazakhstan.
  • Wired examines the causes of the Ebola outbreak, looks at analyses of the networked structure of Jewish religious texts, and examines vintage space station designs.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • blogTO ranks the five busiest subway stations in Toronto.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the idea of using charged particle beams to propel sails.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin notes how some American conservatives blame Ebola on DDT bans.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that exoplanet Kepler 91b, detected by its eclipses of the sun, has been confirmed through radial velocity measurements.
  • The Dragon’s Tale suggests that a mysterious event reported in 775 CE around Eurasia may have been a cometary impact.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers if future shock, once a generational thing, may now be coming more quickly than that.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the decline of the American bathhouse, reports on a Spanish legislator who blames the national debt on same-sex marriage, and observes an anti-HIV organization’s campaign against PReP.
  • Languages of the World’s Asya Perelstvaig examines the origins of Yiddish.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money approves of Bulgarians repainting Soviet war monuments in superheros.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that the Unied States’ economic problems began long before 2008.
  • Otto Pohl reports from Ghana, in the middle of economic and currency collapse.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla notes that the Rosetta spacecraft is current scouting a landing site for its Philae landing on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
  • Torontoist describes how Arnold Palmer got his start at the Canadian Open.
  • Towleroad argues that out actor John Barrowman is a gay icon, and suggests that an anti-gay pogrom in Uganda may not have happened.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that today is the 75th anniversary of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact that divided northeastern Europe up between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Russia’s moves in Ukraine have harmed its Asian interests vis-a-vis China and argues that recent events have consolidated support for Ukrainian statehood.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait suggests that the ESA’s Rosetta probe may have found evidence for a calving event in its target comet.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at Jupiter’s extraordinarily volcanic moon of Io.
  • The Dragon’s Tales’ Will Baird notes a report that Russia plans on opening a new air force base in Belarus.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel describes how Hakodate, the first city of Japan’s Hokkaido island, hosted multiple consulates.
  • Joe. My. God. and Towleroad note how parishoners at a Roman Catholic church in Illinois are rallying behind their church’s music director, fired for announcing his impending marriage.
  • Languages of the World’s Asya Perelstvaig describes, with maps, the issues of Christians in the Middle East.
  • Language Log explores the complexities of newly popular Sanskrit language programs in education.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money explores the survival of the old South and Confederate ideals in the modern Tea Party (1, 2).
  • Marginal Revolution started a discussion as to what the European Central Bank should do.
  • The Planetary Society Blog hosts a post from Jason Davis describing the innovative online interface for data from the crowd-controlled ISEE-3 probe.
  • The Russian Demographics blog notes the confused population policy of Belarus.
  • Spacing Toronto notes how Logan Avenue in the east end has become an unofficial slow street.
  • Torontoist discusses doorings suffered by cyclists.

[BLOG] Some space-related links

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  • Anders Sandberg notes how the book and film 2001 are touchstones still for what we might fear of our future.
  • Centauri Dreams touched on quite a few issues while I was offline, noting a proposed solar-sail probe to Halley’s Comet, notes the positive implications of geysers and liquid water for life on Enceladus, notes the exceptional distance of exoplanet Kepler-421b from its star and precisely measures the size and orbit of Kepler-93b and looks at the dryness of hot Jupiters and studies the misaligned gas discs of the stars of binary HK Tauri, and looks at ways to keep Earth-like planets orbiting red dwarfs habitable for hundreds of billions of years.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that Gliese 1214b is an evaporating hot Neptune, looks at the search for rogue exoplanets in the Pleiades, mourns the non-existence of Gliese 581g and Gliese 481d, points to evidence that X-ray source IGR J17361-4441 was blocked partially and briefly by an exoplanet, looks at the search of exoplanets around nearbuy red dwarf stars, links to a reexamination of some Kepler exoplanet candidates and their stars by the Hubble space telescope, and notes that most worlds more than 1.6 times the radius of Earth are likely to be Neptunes.
  • At The Dragon’s Tales, the planet-reshaping impacts of the Late Heavy Bombardment on the early Earth are noted, as are forces acting on solar sails, as is a proposal to use the Voyager 1 spacecraft’s movements and signals to look for distant planets, as is a paper suggesting that Titan’s inner sea is as salty as the Earth’s.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes (1, 2, 3) the Rosetta spacecraft’s rendezvous with its target comet, notes a conference examining the habitability of Mars, looks at an odd mountain on Vesta, and links to an inventive revisiting of Venera images of the Venus surface.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell celebrates the ESA’s Georges Lemaître ATV, named after a Belgian cosmologist of note.

Written by Randy McDonald

August 12, 2014 at 3:00 am

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO shares pictures of the lineups for free food on Canada Day at Mandarin’s buffet restaurants.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper identifying three thousand nearby red dwarf stars as potential sites of Earth-like exoplanets.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a sober assessment of the Chinese space program.
  • The Frailest Thing considers the import of Facebook’s experiment on its user base by noting the ability of complex systems to undergo unexpected catastrophes.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Google’s social network Orkut, big in Brazil and India but absent elsewhere, will be shutting down at the end of this September.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that anti-gay activists are pleased with the Hobby Lobby ruling.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Adam Block shares pictures of colliding and interacting galaxies.
  • Seriously Science notes that not only do spiders have different personality types, but that these types contribute to the maintenance of their physical cultures.
  • The Signal notes ongoing research into data recovery methods and issues with compact discs.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes cases where putting the victim on trial does matter. (Records of past violence are noteworthy.)
  • Towleroad notes an economist observing that homophobia has an economic impact and points to an upcoming Irish referendum on same-sex marriage in 2015 that’s quite likely to pass.
  • Window on Eurasia quotes a Ukrainian about Russia’s issues with a separate Ukraine and notes a statement by Kaliningrad’s government claiming some Ukrainian refugees in Russia might be anti-Russian activists in disguise.
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