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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

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[NEWS] Some Monday links

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  • Al Jazeera notes the Iraqi desire for foreign intervention, the problems with sex-offender registries, and the plight of former nuclear workers at Hanford in the United States.
  • Bloomberg observes Russian resistance to Western pressure and Ukrainian alliance-seeking, notes that Senegal was declared Ebola-free, looks at the terrible job market in Spain, observes competition in East Asia for wealthy Chinese immigrants, suggests that China’s one-child policy will be relaxed, and examines Turkey’s quiet border with the Islamic State.
  • Bloomberg View compares Russia and Germany in not prioritizing economic growth, looks at how Brookyln is the only borough of New York City to see its housing market recover, notes Turkey’s issues in the Arab world, and examines with problems of Petrobras with expensive deep-sea oil at a time of falling oli prices.
  • The Inter Press Service notes the critical role of mangroves in mitigating disasters and protecting fisheries, looks at ethnic conflict in China, finds hope for civil society in Cuba, suggests that HIV/AIDS can be controlled worldwide, and fears for Iraq’s minorities.
  • National Geographic notes North America’s threatened monarch butterfly migrations and examines Ebola as a zoonosis.
  • Open Democracy notes issues of British Jews with Israeli policy and looks at Russian economic policy.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait shares evidence that a Lake Ontario worth of water is present, in the form of subsurface ice, in Mercury’s polar regions.
  • blogTO profiles the life and latest releases of one-time punk band adolescent frontwoman Chandra Oppenheim.
  • Centauri Dreams features a guest essay by Andrew Lepage on Alpha Centauri Bb, still quite possible.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper examining the study of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs and links to another that seeks to explain the orbits in the system of Fomalhaut.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on Chinese involvement in South Sudan and suggests that Lockheed’s announcement of a working fusion reactor is being greeted skeptically.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests advocates of open borders need more research to support their positions.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw fears for the economic future of the world.
  • Towleroad reports that magistrates in North Carolina are required to perform same-sex marriages or face removal.
  • Transit Toronto examines the consequences of last night’s flooding for the TTC system.
  • Why I Love Toronto likes Summerhill Avenue.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russian liberals like Navalny are unwilling to challenge Russian policies in Ukraine.
  • The World reports on the latest developments in Spain re: Catalonian separatism.

[NEWS] Some Monday links

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  • Al Jazeera warns about the militarization of the Ukrainian state, notes the alienation of Turkish Kurds from their goverment and wonders if northern Syria will become a Turkish protectorate, wishes Arab authors could travel to the United States more readily, wonders about the impact of immigrants on Catalonian separatism, and notes Wheaton College’s issue with new federal healthcare regulations.
  • Bloomberg observes the shrinkage of the American labour force, the success of the coffee crop in Vietnam, the emigration from ethnic Czechs from Ukraine to the Czech Republic, the successful retention of industry in Singapore, observes the debilitating toll of illegal fisheries off of the West African coast, and notes the call for an investigation into the treatment of the United States’ first Ebola victim.
  • Bloomberg View notes that Uber can succeed only in the context of a struggling labour market, looks at the economic issues of European petrostates, notes how political concerns override fears for the Russian economy, argues British cities also need autonomy, and via Faroese fish exports notes that sanctions may not have that much effort.
  • CBC notes Tanya Tagaq’s stalking by a sexually aggressive man in Winnipeg, and notes that Windsor is using cayenne peppers to deter squirrels from attacking the city’s tulips. (That last should work.)
  • The Inter Press Service notes the scale of Samoan emigration, observes the negative consequences of climate change for livestock farmers in the Caribbean, looks at the drought besetting Sao Paulo, looks at an economically questionable train line in Sri Lanka, considers how the Karabakh issue makes Armenian entry into the Eurasian Union problematic, and u>observes anti-Palestinian discrimination in housing in the Jerusalem area.
  • IWPR reports on growing Ukraine-related ethnic tensions in Kazakhstan and observes Georgia’s clampdown on immigration.
  • Open Democracy recommends a consistent policy of European Union opening to the western Balkans, notes the plight of Copts in Egypt, looks at ethnic tensions in North Ossetia between Ossetians and Ingush, examines Basque and Corsican separatisms, fears for the future of secularism in Mali and Senegal, and considers the dire demographics of Ukraine.

[NEWS] Some Sunday links

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  • Al Jazeera notes the effects of population aging worldwide, observes the quarantining of four individuals possibly exposed to Ebola, comments on the huge costs associated with reconstruction in eastern Ukraine, and reports on a conference held by the Vatican on the plight of Middle Eastern Christians.
  • Bloomberg notes the recovery of house prices in Hungary, notes that elderly Koreans are being warned against speculative investments, looks at Southeast Asian Muslims going off to fight in Syria, notes the resistance of farmers to Thailand’s junta, quotes Angela Merkel’s comparison of the Ukrainian crisis to the decades-long Cold War and East Germany, looks at possible Russian capital controls and growing Spanish public indebtedness, points to the aging of Sweden’s nuclear reactors, looks at Catalonia’s separatists as they prepare for a controversial independence referendum, and warns the world about Japan.
  • Bloomberg View notes the profound uncertainty over Ebola, suggests Shanghai cannot replace Hong Kong as a financial centre yet, looks at skyrocketing real estate prices at the far upper end of the New York City scene, and suggests that Hong Kong’s revolt will sputter out.
  • CBC notes that Makayla Sault, a First Nations child who refused treatment for her leukemia, is relapsing, notes that global warming is leading Greenlanders to hunt more orcas, observes that the Islamic State has ended the Arab spring, and wonders what China will do with Hong Kong.
  • IWPR notes the odd optimism of many eastern Ukrainians, looks at the problems of Syrian Armenian refugee schoolchildren in the Armenian school system, and notes controversy over the creation of a Russian satellite university in Armenia.
  • National Geographic notes the new phenomenon of sanctuaries for former pet pigs, and suggests that threats to an Ottoman tomb could bring Turkey into Syria.
  • Open Democracy notes the plight of Syrian Kurds, suggests that secularism is an alternative to oppressive religious identities, and criticizes European Union migration policy.
  • Wired looks at Europe’s history of trying animals for crimes and examines Andy Warhol’s sketching of Blondie’s Debbie Harry on an Amiga.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomy examines asteroid 2014 OL339, a quasi-moon on Earth.
  • blogTO notes an ongoing satirical campaign targeting the mayoral campaign of Doug Ford.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the mysterious orbit in Titan’s Ligeia Mare.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes 3:1 and 2:1 orbital resonances of multi-planet systems discovered by Kepler.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the continuing Ukrainian war.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that New York City is promoting PrEP on Grindr.
  • Languages of the World’s Asya Perelstvaig examines the word “cucumber” used in European languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that ocean acidification produced by greenhouse gas emissions will end oysters in their natural habitat.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if Catalonia’s referendum on independence will take place.
  • Registan doesn’t like how Russian experts see the spectre of the Islamic State throughout central Asia and miss real issues there.
  • Spacing Toronto notes the import of indigenous soundscapes.
  • Window on Eurasia notes who Russian sympathizers are abroad, notes that Muscovites live on average six years longer than people elsewhere in Russia, and observes Russian interest in Russophone minorities in the Baltic States.
  • The Yorkshire Ranter shares a variety of charts, including some showing the Eurozone’s lagging recovery from the 2008-2009 recession and the concentration of English identity in rural areas and in the east.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • blogTO selects the top twenty music videos filmed in Toronto.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Catalonian separatists have not been put off by the failure of Scotland to separate.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the false stereotypes behind the child migrant crisis.
  • Geocurrents notes the advance of the Islamic State against Kurds in Syria.
  • Joe. My. God. quotes an anti-gay American conservative unhappy some people are suspicious of her just because she and hers are attending a conference in Putin’s Moscow.
  • Marginal Revolution quotes a Japan pessimist who thinks demographics mean the Japanese economy will do well not to shrink.
  • Bruce Sterling shares a map of present and future natural gas pipelines in Europe.
  • Towleroad notes Nicolas Sarkozy’s criticism of same-sex marriage for humiliating French families.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Kaliningrad separatism is a major issue, or at least seen to be a major issue.

[NEWS] Some Sunday links

  • Al Jazeera notes the quilombos of Brazil founded by escaped slaves and looks at the strength of the separatist vote in Scotland’s largest city of Glasgow.
  • Bloomberg notes continuing tensions between North Korea and Japan over Japanese abductees, looks at Russian state subsidies to sanctions-hit companies, suggests a softening of Polish foreign policy versus Russia, and notes how Johannesburg is flourishing as gateway to Africa despite high crime and inequality.
  • The Bloomberg View notes separatist concerns depressing yields of Catalonian and Spanish bonds, and wonders if Gujarat’s industrial economy might serve as an example for all India.
  • CBC notes that national newspapers are no longer being sold in Yellowknife, looks at the case of an Iroquois girl refusing chemotherapy, and notes that the Angelina Jolie effect boosting breast cancer screening endures.
  • Open Democracy examines Catalonian separatism, looks at India’s changing Palestinian policy, considers trends in ideology in Hungary, wonders if Jordan will be next to succumb to the Islamic state, and examines anti-Syrian sentiment in Lebanon.
  • Wired examines teletext and notes the strength of China’s Alibaba.
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