A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘sports

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • 3 Quarks Daily examines an effort to set up an arts and culture centre in Karachi.
  • Alpha Sources’ Claus Vistesen wonders if another Eurozone crisis is looming in the near future.
  • blogTO reports on Olivia Chow’s call for an apartment building rating system akin to that of restaurant ratings.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper speculating on reasons for the very odd surface of Uranus’ moon Miranda.
  • Far Outliers looks at the issues facing early baseball radio broadcasting.
  • Joe. My. God. and Towleroad both note a Russian lawmaker’s call to ban the entry of mail carrying Finland’s popular Tom of Finland-themed stamps.
  • Language Hat considers the origins of the term “prehistory”.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes discrimination against pregnant workers.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers grounds to believe that a continued British North America including the United States would not have been a success. The survival of intercolonial trade barriers would be an issue.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle photoblogs his close encounter with a red fox.
  • Window on Eurasia notes speculation about a partition of Crimea, considers the need for more surveys of Russian territory to look for natural resources, and observes that Ukrainian refugees resettled in the autonomous republics of Russia aren’t required to learn local languages.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly describes the collapse of an online community she quite liked.
  • Cody Delistraty links to his article in The Atlantic about the benefits of multilingualism.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers the numbers and implications of low-wage earners.
  • The Frailest Things’ Michael Sacasas links to articles about big data, suggesting ways in which it undermines our sense of self-control.
  • Geocurrents considers alternate history maps.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that West Germany had high inflation in the 1970s and 1980s.
  • Otto Pohl thinks pan-Africanism can start by creating uniform electrical plugs.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers alternate histories for Mexico, paying particular attention to the idea of a smaller Mexico after 1848.
  • Spacing Toronto’s John Lorinc argues John Tory bested Olivia Chow by not being over-specific.
  • Torontoist notes the travails of a girl who became an amateur hockey player in the mid-1950s.
  • Window on Eurasia considers how Russian liberals could return Crimea, deconstructs the alleged Chinese threat, and notes a startlingly anti-Russian press conference delivered by Belarus’ Lukashenko.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • 3 Quarks Daily talks about the complexities of gentrification in Brooklyn.
  • A BCer in Toronto wonders where school trustee Harout Manougian stands on the subject of gay-straight alliances.
  • Centauri Dreams discusses the mapping of the weather on WASP-43b.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper discussing the complexities of mapping the non-spherical moons of Mars.
  • Far Outliers looks at the role of ethnic minorities in late 19th century Pacific coast baseball in the US.
  • Language Hat looks at folkloric elements in the Russian Chronicles.
  • Savage Minds celebrates the 13th of October as Indigenous Peoples Day.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the Ukrainian war has radicalized the Russian right.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • blogTO shares photos of Nuit Blanche.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper suggesting that relatively recent presence of glaciers on some high Martian mountain slopes.
  • Eastern Approaches looks at the ethnically riven Latvian election.
  • Far Outliers looks at the grim situation for civil rights in early independent Romania and the problematic democracy of the interwar period.
  • Languages of the World’s Asya Perelstvaig maps the distribution of Ukrainians in modern Russia.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Shenzhen is thriving on the basis of–among other things–mobile phones.
  • Otto Pohl looks at the history of Communism in colonial Ghana.
  • Savage Minds features an anthropologist talking about the specific issues of academic writing.
  • Torontoist and blogTO both talk about things that went well with Nuit Blanche and things that did not go so well.
  • Towleroad observes anti-gay persecution in Indonesia’s westernmost region of Aceh.
  • Transit Toronto notes the disruption to the TTC caused by the closing-off of Yonge-Dundas Square for a hockey festival there.

[URBAN NOTE] “Kayaking the Rouge River and Toronto’s harbour and islands: A photo essay”

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Technology journalist Mathew Ingram has a lovely photo post describing a recent kayak trip he took down the Rouge River, in Scarborough, to Toronto harbour.

I got a kayak for my 50th birthday a couple of years ago — a red, 14-foot Perception Carolina, in case you’re interested in the specifics, with two dry wells — and I’ve been paddling a lot around our cottage north of Toronto, but I hadn’t brought it down to the city before until this fall. I thought I would bring it and see if there was enough to do with it to make it worthwhile, especially since we live near where the Rouge River feeds into Lake Ontario.

I’ve biked down the lake-front trail near our house to the mouth of the Rouge many times, and across the bridge into Pickering and along the bluffs out to Frenchman’s Bay, and I would often see kayaks and canoes coming down the river, and wonder where they had been. So one day I strapped the kayak to our old car and headed over to the Rouge.

It was a beautiful sunny day, and I paddled around the marshes at the mouth of the river for a bit and saw some swans and Canada geese, some blue herons and some white egrets, and then I headed up-river. Unfortunately, I had chosen to go just a couple of days after a big rainstorm, and the river was running quite hard — I was fighting the current the whole way, and after about 45 minutes of hard paddling I could go no further. The ride back to the mouth of the river took me about 15 minutes.

Go, enjoy.

Written by Randy McDonald

October 6, 2014 at 10:55 pm

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • blogTO recommends things to do in Bloorale and the Junction Triangle.
  • The Cranky Sociologists look at the portrayal of gender in The Wire.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze examines the phenomenon of the tidal disruption of extremely eccentric asteroids in orbit of white dwarfs.
  • A Fistful of Euros recommends Orlando Figes’ Just Send Me Word, a history of a couple whose romance survived the gulag.
  • Geocurrents contests the idea of an “arc of instability”.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on a Berlin Grindr-based art project that got shut down early for streaming private messages and images.
  • Language Log shares video of Jiamg Zemin demonstrating his multilingualism in criticizing a Hong Kong journalist.
  • Languages of the World’s Asya Perelstvaig is critical of the idea that some words are “ultra-conserved”, preserving records of ancient languages.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a study suggesting that the French economy is less productive than its age structure indicates.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog suggests that the Russian campaign in Ukraine has worked, at least in making European integration more difficult.
  • Spacing Toronto notes one complication for construction companies: Toronto’s bedrock swells.
  • Torontoist covers the Torontonian relief given to survivors of the great 1922 Teminskaming fire in 1922.
  • Towleroad shares video on the occasion of Denmark’s first recognized same-sex union.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy shares information on how Ebola is transmitted.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Crimean Tatar disappearances, notes continuing divisions in Ukraine on attitudes towards Russia, and observes that many Chinese immigrants to Kazakhstan are not ethnically Chinese.
  • The Financial Times‘s The World notes that many in Norway are still divided about their country’s rejection of the 2022 Winter Olympics.
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