A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘tajikistan

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

  • The Globe and Mail notes that the Ukrainian revolution isn’t so popular in Ukraine’s second city of Kharkiv, largely Russophone and Rusasophile.
  • Al Jazeera profiles the first generation of children born into the large ex-Yugoslav community in the American city of St. Louis and examines the ongoing persecution of Sikhs in Afghanistan.
  • CBC observes uproar on Prince Edward Island about changes in employment insurance requiring people in the more prosperous area of Charlottetown to work more to qualify, and reports on a worrying polls suggesting half of Québec’s non-Francophones are considering leaving the province.
  • National Geographic chronicles the stress on water reserves in Jordan placed by the huge influx of Syrian refugees.
  • The New York Times features an op-ed suggesting that the European Union should signal to Ukraine that membership is possible.
  • Open Democracy notes worries in Tajikistan that the withdrawal of foreign troops in Afghanistan will leave it exposed to instability there.
  • New Europe observes that, in fact, hordes of Romanians and Bulgarians haven’t overwhelmed the United Kingdom.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • BlogTO notes that the old Carnegie library at Queen and Lisgar, in my old neighbourhood of West Queen West or Parkdale, is going to become a theatre centre.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait is glad there isn’t a star as spectacularly unstable as EZ Canis Majoris in our neighbourhood.
  • Patrick Cain links to his Global News debunking of the myth that American citizens living in Canada are often wealthy expatriates.
  • Centauri Dreams examines the concept of superhabitable planets, noting among other things that K-class orange dwarfs like Alpha Centauri B would be great.
  • D-Brief notes the sad mechanical problems of China’s Yutu moon rover.
  • The Dragon’s Tales observes evidence that the migratory Sea Peoples of ancient Egypt came from Europe.
  • At Halfway Down the Danube, Douglas Muir writes about his experiences hiking in Kosovo, with the Prizren mountaineers club.
  • Joe. My. God., Lawyers, Guns and Money, and the New APPS Blog all mourn the death of politically active folk singer Peter Seeger.
  • Language Log’s Victor Mair analyzes the evocative Chinese-language name of a Vancouver restaurant.
  • The Numerati’s Stephen Baker responds to Godwin’s Law as evoking the thoughts of people who can’t express themselves.
  • Registan links to anthropologist Sarah Kendzior’s argument that Central Asia studies, once dynamic and vital, have gone into decay as people have stopped paying attention to the region.
  • Savage Minds shares Haitian-American anthropologist Gina Athena Ulysse’s writing about her creative process.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a report that Tajikistan’s government is unhappy with Tajiks who add Russian endings (“ov”, et cetera) to their names.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Acts of Minor Treason’s Andrew Barton photographs the ever-changing and increasingly condo-ized intersection of Queen Street West with Dufferin.
  • James Bow points to a McDonald’s in Scarborough that appears for all the world to be abandoned. (Suburbia can be a wasteland.)
  • Centauri Dreams notes that astronomers have ingeniously managed to determine the characteristics of the atmosphere of exoplanet GJ3470b, a hot Neptune closely orbiting a red dwarf.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that South Asia was repopulated by migrants from Africa after the Toba volcanic explosion.
  • GNXP takes a look at some interesting genetic analysis of Caribbean populations.
  • Joe. My. God. notes, with others, the irony of anti-Castro Cuban-American Marco Rubio defending the same homophobic policies that Castro would have advanced.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money does not think that internships can be defended.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen and The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer both note that Honduras seems interested in charter cities. The latter doesn’t think much will come of it.
  • Elsewhere at The Power and the Money, Noel Maurer observes that Colombia is actually a very close ally of the United States and sees, in the relationship of Brazil with an Ecuador that has tried to harass Brazilian companies, the birth of a Brazilian hegemony in South America.
  • Torontoist notes that ambitious plans for expanding St. Lawrence Market North have been sharply downgraded.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an Uzbek writer who argues that the death of the Aral Sea will affect even upstream countries in Central Asia like Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, whether directly through environmental catastrophe or indirectly through regional tensions.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling is skeptical that plans to archive vast quantities of archived data accumulated over decades, even centuries, are going to be viable.
  • The Burgh Diaspora notes that for southern Europeans, Latin America is once again emerging as a destination–this time, the migration is of professionals seeking opportunities they can’t find at home.
  • The Dragon’s Tales’ Will Baird links to a proposal by biologists that life initially evolved in highly saline environments.
  • Democracy is still fragile in the former Soviet republic of Georgia, Eastern Approaches notes.
  • Odd placenames in Minnesota are analyzed at Far Outliers.
  • A Fistful of Euros’ Alex Harrowell notes the translation problems surrounding the Nazi term volkisch, liking one recent translator’s suggestion that “racist” works best.
  • Razib Khan at GNXP introduces readers to the historical background behind the recent ethnic conflict in Burma.
  • Itching for Eestimaa’s Guistino takes a look at same-sex marriage in Estonia.
  • Savage Minds reviews Nicholas Shaxson’s book Treasure Islands, which took a look at offshore banking centres like Cyprus.
  • Torontoist’s Kevin Plummer describes the background behind Elvis’ 1957 performances in Toronto.
  • The negative effects of mass migration to Russia from Central Asia on sending countries, especially the republics of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, are introduced at Window on Eurasia.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bag News Notes’ Michael Shaw wonders whether the real problem with the attempted Nelson Mandela photo op wasn’t that it took advantage of a man in ill health but that it did so badly.
  • What does it mean, Daniel Drezner asks, that almost all transactions one’s likely to encounter in China–even ones that would be handled electronically–are handled in cash? (A lack of trust in the banks, perhaps?)
  • The issue of anti-Semitism in Hungary as it hosts the World Jewish Congress is tackled at Eastern Approaches.
  • A Fistful of Euros’ Edward Hugh is skeptical about Shinzo Abe’s inflationary experiment in Japan, since–he argues–shifting demographics are pushing Japan towards deflation and economic decline.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money places the recent catastrophe in Bangladesh in perspective. Clothing manufacturers have almost always made use of easily-exploited, marginal, and–literally–disposable labour.
  • Registan notes that, after the arrest of two Kazakhstani students in Boston for complicity with the younger Tsarnaev brother after the fact, people are now looking at Islam in Kazakhstan. (It’s historically quite placid, FWIW.)
  • The Volokh Conspiracy’s Eugene Volokh reacts to a report finding a disturbingly high level of support for honour killings in many parts of the Muslim world.
  • Window on Eurasia reports that Tajikistan is trying to limit the abuse of its migrant workers in Russia by stationing diplomatic personnel to greet and guide new arrivals.
  • Wonkman makes the case for the utility of labels in referring to people, since they can legitimately help guide and identify them. (He’s talking about GLBT/queer identities, but I think the principle is portable.)

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Behind the Numbers’ Carl Haub notes that most of the recent fall in American fertility is a consequence of falling Mexican-American fertility, with fertility in other groups remaining stable.
  • Daniel Drezner is upset that, according to its star Brad Pitt, the film version of World War Z will minimize the international politics of the anti-zombie war inasmuch as those politics made the book.
  • Eastern Approaches notes ongoing tensions in Slovakia over that nation’s history of collaboration with the Nazis in the Second World War.
  • At Language Log, Steven Bird links to his account of how he’s using Android tablets to record the languages of indigenous tribes in the Brazilian Amazon.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen thinks that Cyprus would have done better to leave the Eurozone altogether and adopt a new currency rather than stay in the Eurozone.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer is surprised that Cypriots are willing to tolerate the Euro even with the terrible costs it imposes on their economy.
  • Visual Science’s Perrin Ireland documents the biosphere discovered to exist in some oceanic crustal areas.
  • Window on Eurasia’s Paul Goble notes that, as a result of emigration, the once-large Russophone community of Tajikistan has almost entirely disappeared.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Crooked Timber has two posts on David Cameron’s announcement of a referendum, hopefully, on British membership in the European Union, to be held in a few years.
  • Eastern Approaches had two posts on the recent Czech election, noting that the defeated candidate, Prince Schwarzenberg, was hobbled as much by his German associations as by his links to the previous government.
  • Far Outliers notes the Americanization of Buddhism, and of the Japanese-Americans who practiced it, in post-Second World War Hawai’i.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money’s Dave Brockington also comments on Britain’s relationship with the European Union.
  • Norman Geras notes the hatred of Mali’s insurgents for music.
  • Registan’s Nathan Hamm warns that a post-Karimov Uzbekistan might intervene on behalf of Uzbek minorities in neighbouring states.
  • Torontoist posted an excerpt from Edward Keenan’s new book about Toronto, Some Great Idea.
  • Might Iran buy water from Tajikistan? Windows on Eurasia notes the statement of interest.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Andrew Barton at Acts of Minor Treason observes that the invade-the-United-States meme hasn’t become more plausible over time, the differences between the first Red Dawn (featuring a Soviet invasion) and the second (featuring North Korea) being a case in point.
  • Centauri Dreams offers more commentary on the non-detection of Earth-size planets orbiting Barnard’s Star.
  • Far Outliers posts from Bill Hayton’s book on Vietnam describing how the entrepreneurial southern provinces of Vietnam helped save the national economy after reunification.
  • Geocurrents notes the revival of Berbera, city in unrecognized Somaliland, over the past two decades.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the importance of the shipping pallet.
  • Can oil really make things better for Tajikistan, wonders?

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Andrew Barton at Acts of Minor Treason observes that the invade-the-United-States meme hasn’t become more plausible over time, the differences between the first Red Dawn (featuring a Soviet invasion) and the second (featuring North Korea) being a case in point.
  • Centauri Dreams offers more commentary on the non-detection of Earth-size planets orbiting Barnard’s Star.
  • Far Outliers posts from Bill Hayton’s book on Vietnam describing how the entrepreneurial southern provinces of Vietnam helped save the national economy after reunification.
  • Geocurrents notes the revival of Berbera, city in unrecognized Somaliland, over the past two decades.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the importance of the shipping pallet.
  • Can oil really make things better for Tajikistan, wonders?

Written by Randy McDonald

August 17, 2012 at 11:01 am

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