A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • blogTO shares pictures from Toronto in the 1970s and 1980s.
  • Crooked Timber reacts, perhaps not wisely, to the recent British government state that an independent Scotland would not automatically have a currency union with the United Kingdom.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that tidal heating of Mars-mass planets in the circumstellar habitable zones of red dwarf stars could keep them habitable.
  • The Dragon’s Tales observes arguments that Vesta may have had a magma ocean for a long time period.
  • Far Outliers observes the impuissance of the last Ottoman ruler of Syria faced with the Armenian genocide and comments upon how the response of the American government after the First World War to abandon the Middle East did not help things.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas responds to Nick Kristof’s wondering where all the public intellectuals are by arguing that whole concept may just be an effect of a centralized mass culture.
  • At Halfway Down the Danube, Douglas Muir notes that Kosovo hasn’t had much of a winter.
  • Language Hat has two posts on language standardization, one on Aramaic in the ancient Middle East an the other on Hazaragi, a Persian dialect spoken by–here–Shi’ite Afghanistan refugees in Australia.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the dire situation of tea plantation workers.
  • The Map Room’s Jonathan Crowe links to recent maps of Ganymede and Mercury.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer comments on the tumult in Venezuela by wondering why that country’s government has been so incompetent.
  • Thought Catalog features a first-person essay by Iranian gay refugee in Canada Shawn Kermanipour.
  • Towleroad remarks on the gay icon status of Blondie’s Debbie Harry.
  • Transit Toronto’s Robert McKenzie observes that the TTC is offering transit users the chance to “Meet the Manager” of different stations.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that migration from Belarus to Russia is becoming a serious issue for both countries, whether because of labour shortages in Belarus or Russian immigrant politics.
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