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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

[CAT] “India’s Tigers May Be Rebounding, in Rare Success for Endangered Species”

Brian Clark Howard’s National Geographic feature is hopeful.

More money has been spent on tiger conservation than on preserving any other species in the world, yet wildlife biologists have been seemingly unable to stop the decline of the iconic big cat in the face of poaching and habitat loss.

That appeared to change Tuesday, when the government of India—the country is home to most of the world’s wild tigers—announced preliminary results of the latest tiger census that reveal a surge in the number of the big cats in its preserves over the past seven years.

India’s environment minister, Prakash Javadekar, announced that its scientists had counted 2,226 wild tigers in the country, up from 1,411 seven years ago, a rise of nearly 58 percent. The country now hosts about 70 percent of the world’s wild tigers, Javadekar said, calling the increase “a great achievement … the result of the combined efforts of passionate officers, forest guards, and community participation.”

“The tiger community is thrilled to finally hear some good news,” says Sharon Guynup, an author who writes about tigers, including co-authoring the recent book Tigers Forever for National Geographic.

A new global survey of tiger numbers is expected in about a year, says Guynup. Until then, scientists estimate there are around 3,000 living in the wild, down from an estimated 100,000 at the beginning of the 20th century.

The big cats used to live in 23 countries but have been reduced to 11. Most recently, they disappeared from the wild in Cambodia and Vietnam in the past few years.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 31, 2015 at 6:23 pm

Posted in Politics, Science

Tagged with , , ,

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