A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

[BLOG} Some social science links

  • The Cranky Sociologists consider a series of controversial videos examining issues of racism and discrimination in Auckland.
  • Crooked Timber’s Chris Bertram argues that European countries are responsible for migrant deaths in the Mediterranean.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers the international market in surrogate mothers.
  • The Frailest Thing considers desire in the world of things, and examines the connections between machine work and the value of people.
  • Kieran Healy notes the often wild guesses made by Americans at the population size of the United States.
  • Language Hat notes the dislike of Russian aristocrats for the Russian language, and maps London’s different languages.
  • Language Log takes issue with a map of the languages of the world in regards to China, and looks at Cantonese usage in Hong Kong.
  • Languages of the World considers Google Translate.
  • Marginal Revolution examines China’s ideological spectrum and notes a New Zealand database that can predict outcomes for young people.
  • The New APPS Blog argues in favour of citing unpublished papers and praises the bravery of migrants.
  • pollotenchegg maps the distribution of refugees in the Ukrainian government-controlled Donbas.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at recent fertility increases in post-graduate American women.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog examined the changing nature of migration to and from Russia, looks at the demographic experiences over Belarus, considers the Russian HIV epidemic, and examines the link between fertility and economic shocks in the United States.
  • Savage Minds examines a new book on the Bougainville conflict, looks at racism in Baltimore, and reacts to the earthquake in Nepal.
  • Towleroad and the Volokh Conspiracy note that, properly analyzed, the data of Regnerus actually contradicts his claims about same-sex parents.
  • Zero Geography looks at the hidden biases of geodata.
%d bloggers like this: