A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at how stellar winds from red dwarfs complicate the habitability of planets in their circumstellar habitable zones.
  • The Crux, noting the 75th anniversary of the atomic age, notes some non-nuclear weapons achievements of this era.
  • D-Brief notes the exceptional strength of prehistoric women farmers.
  • Daily JSTOR takes a look at the instantaneity and power–frightening power, even–of celebrity culture in an era where technology gives us access to the intimate details of their lives.
  • Far Outliers notes that Pearl Buck, American author and missionary in China, actually was egalitarian and feminist.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers all those texts created in the past, of importance then and relevant even now, which have been forgotten. How can the canon be restored?
  • Imageo shares photos of the eruption of Mount Agung, in Bali.
  • Language Hat notes the intense interest of Roman Italy in all things Egyptian, including hieroglyphics. Where, exactly, was the like European interest in the cultures it colonized more recently?
  • Language Log tries to find people who can identify the source language of a particular text. It seems Turkic …
  • Lingua France talks about Robert Luis Stevenson and his opinions (and the blogger’s) about the weather of Edinburgh.
  • Lovesick Cyborg notes the seriously destabilizing potential of roboticization on human employment. To what extent can improving education systems help?
  • Tariq Ali at the LRB Blog talks about the latest religious-political crisis in Pakistan.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an article describing a Vietnamese historian’s search for cartographic proof of his country’s claims in the South China Sea.
  • The NYR Daily considers an interesting question: how, exactly, do you get an actor to act naturally for film? What strategies do filmmakers use?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes a new genetic study hinting at a much greater survival of indigenous populations–women, at least–in Argentina than was previously suspected.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes an interesting effort to try to preserve and restore the older districts of Kabul.
  • Seriously Science notes the exploration of the microbial life populating the coffee machine sludge of some inquisitive scientists.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that substantially Russian-populated northern Kazakhstan is at risk of becoming a new Russian target, especially after Nazarbayev goes.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some thoughts on people of colour and the LGBTQ rainbow flag.
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