A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Ryan Anderson at Anthrodendum takes a look at how the threat posed to coastal properties by sea level rise reveals much about how human beings assign value.
  • A BCer in Toronto’s Jeff Jedras writes about the food at a Newfoundlander party in Ottawa.
  • D-Brief considers how past ice ages might have been caused by the shifting poles.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the work of Michelle Pannor Silver, looking at how retirement can influence the identities of individuals.
  • Far Outliers notes that, in its first major wars, Japan treated prisoners of war well.
  • JSTOR Daily examines a paper that takes a look at how the X-Men have achieved such resonance in pop culture, such power as symbols of minorities’ persecution and survival.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is critical of the effusive press coverage of Mitt Romney, new Republican senator.
  • Geoffrey Pullum at Lingua Franca shares, for other English speakers, a lexicon of specialized words from the United Kingdom regarding Brexit.
  • At the LRB Blog, Hyo Yoon Kang takes a look at a series of legal hearings investigating the possibility of assigning legal responsibility for global warming to “carbon majors” like big oil.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution shares his argument that the history of the 21st century United States might look like that of the 19th century, with progress despite political disarray.
  • The NYR Daily shares the arguments of scholar of populism, Jan-Werner Müller, looking at what Cold War liberalism has to say now.
  • Peter Rukavina shares the story of his two visits to relatives around the Croatian city of Kutina, with photos.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how astronomers solved the mystery of the “Zone of Avoidance”, the portions of space blotted out by the dense plane of our galaxy.
  • Window on Eurasia reports from a conference on minority languages where speakers complain about Russian government pressures against their languages.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at tea, starting with tea-time aphorisms and going further afield.
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