A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares a lovely photo of the Earth peeking out from behind the far side of the Moon.
  • At the Broadside Blog, Caitlin Kelly shares lovely photos of delicate ice and water taken on a winter’s walk.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the study by Chinese astronomers who, looking at the distribution of Cepheids, figured out that our galaxy’s disk is an S-shaped warp.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence that melting of the Greenland ice sheet will disrupt the Gulf Stream.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing takes issue with the uncritical idealization of the present, as opposed to the critical examination of whatever time period we are engaging with.
  • Gizmodo notes that an intensive series of brain scans is coming closer to highlighting the areas of the human brain responsible for consciousness.
  • Mark Graham links to new work of his, done in collaboration, looking at ways to make the sharing economy work more fairly in low- and middle-income countries.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the mystic Catholicism of the African kingdom of Kongo may have gone on to inspire slave-led revolutions in 18th century North America and Haiti.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at an exhibition examining the ambitious architecture of Yugoslavia.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a cartographer’s argument about the continuing importance of paper maps.
  • Marginal Revolution shares one commenter’s perception of causes or the real estate boom in New Zealand.
  • Neuroskeptic considers the role of the mysterious silent neurons in the human brain.
  • At NYR Daily, Guadeloupe writer Maryse Condé talks about her career as a writer and the challenges of identity for her native island.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares a list of ten dishes reflecting the history of the city of Lisbon.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel takes a look at the promise of likely mini-Neptune Barnard’s Star b as a target for observation, perhaps even life.
  • Window on Eurasia shares the perfectly plausible argument that, just as the shift of the Irish to the English language did not end Irish identity and nationalism, so might a shift to Russian among Tatars not end Tatar identity.
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