A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Archive for the ‘Canada’ Category

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Niagara Falls, Brantford, Regina, Tofino, Port Moody

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  • Why are the falls at Niagara Falls so famously compelling, even lethally seductive for some? Some human brains might be confused by the immensity. The National Post reports.
  • The extent of the flooding in Brantford, inland from Hamilton on the Grand River, is shocking. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The Saskatchewan capital city of Regina turns out to be the McDonald’s breakfast capital of Canada. Global News reports.
  • This essay in The Globe and Mail by Greg Blanchette looking at the rental housing crunch in the small Vancouver Island town of Tofino describes what’s frankly a terrifying situation.
  • If not for the fact that the CP Railway owned no property locally, the Vancouver suburb of Port Moody could well have become Canada’s biggest west coast metropolis. Global News reports.
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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology.net notes that lidar scanning has revealed that the pre-Columbian city of Angamuco, in western Mexico, is much bigger than previously thought.
  • James Bow makes an excellent case for the revitalization of VIA Rail as a passenger service for longer-haul trips around Ontario.
  • D-Brief notes neurological evidence suggesting why people react so badly to perceived injustices.
  • The Dragon’s Tales takes a look at the list of countries embracing thorough roboticization.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the most powerful launch vehicles, both Soviet and American, to date.
  • Far Outliers considers Safavid Iran as an imperfect gunpowder empire.
  • Despite the explanation, I fail to see how LGBTQ people could benefit from a cryptocurrency all our own. What would be the point, especially in homophobic environments where spending it would involve outing ourselves? Hornet Stories shares the idea.
  • Imageo notes that sea ice off Alaska has actually begun contracting this winter, not started growing.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the production and consumption of lace, and lace products, was highly politicized for the Victorians.
  • Language Hat makes a case for the importance of translation as a political act, bridging boundaries.
  • Language Log takes a look at the pronunciation and mispronunciation of city names, starting with PyeongChang.
  • This critical Erik Loomis obituary of Billy Graham, noting the preacher’s many faults, is what Graham deserves. From Lawyers, Guns and Money, here.
  • Bernard Porter at the LRB Blog is critical of the easy claims that Corbyn was a knowing agent of Communist Czechoslovakia.
  • The Map Room Blog shares this map from r/mapporn, imagining a United States organized into states as proportionally imbalanced in population as the provinces of Canada?
  • Marginal Revolution rightly fears a possible restart to the civil war in Congo.
  • Neuroskeptic reports on a controversial psychological study in Ghana that saw the investigation of “prayer camps”, where mentally ill are kept chain, as a form of treatment.
  • The NYR Daily makes the case that the Congolese should be allowed to enjoy some measure of peace from foreign interference, whether from the West or from African neighbous (Rwanda, particularly).
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla looks at the many things that can go wrong with sample return missions.
  • Rocky Planet notes that the eruption of Indonesian volcano Sinabung can be easily seen from space.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how the New Horizons Pluto photos show a world marked by its subsurface oceans.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, although fertility rates among non-Russians have generally fallen to the level of Russians, demographic momentum and Russian emigration drive continue demographic shifts.
  • Livio Di Matteo at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative charts the balance of federal versus provincial government expenditure in Canada, finding a notable shift towards the provinces in recent decades.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell makes the case, through the example of the fire standards that led to Grenfell Tower, that John Major was more radical than Margaret Thatcher in allowing core functions of the state to be privatized.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at some alcoholic drinks with outré names.

[NEWS] Five politics links on the Ontario PCs

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  • Patrick Brown, recently fired, has registered as a candidate in the Ontario PC leadership race. CBC reports.
  • Martin Regg Cohn notes how the leadership race, wholly unexpected, reveals the PC’ weakness, rival leaders tearing each other and their party alike, over at the Toronto Star.
  • Robert Benzie notes that getting rid of Patrick Brown has actually helped the PCs versus the Liberals, by giving the main opposition party in Ontario a chance at a more appealing leader. His article is available at the Toronto Star.
  • Doug Ford and Christine Elliott have promised, if elected, to revisit the controversial sex-ed curriculum introduced by Wynne and the Liberals. CBC reports.
  • Rob Salerno at Daily Xtra suggests that Christine Elliott’s LGBT-friendly policies in previous years could be a good sign to her preferred policies if selected as party leader.

[NEWS] Five sci-tech links: cryptocurrency in Hamilton and Québec, Alberta, fish, libraires

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  • Hamilton, Ontario, is apparently becoming a major centre for cryptocurrency mining. CBC reports.
  • Hydro-Québec is considering higher electricity rates for bitcoin miners. Global News reports.
  • The rate at which Alberta’s natural environments are disappearing in the face of development is alarming. Global News reports.
  • Fish habitats in Canada, happily, will receive extra protection under a new federal law. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Public libraries are successfully reinventing themselves as places where users can access technology generally. MacLean’s reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 16, 2018 at 7:00 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Four city links: New York City, Pittsburgh, Vancouver, Saskatoon and Regina

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  • The landlord who destroyed the 5Pointz warehouse in New York City, for real estate development, despite the importance of its graffiti, has been ordered to compensate the art’s creators almost seven million dollars. VICE reports.
  • Pittsburgh’s model of urban renaissance, based on heavy investment in high-tech and education, is still used as a model for cities everywhere. Bloomberg View has it.
  • Vancouver has announced plans to remove viaducts and to replace them with towers and park space. Global News reports.
  • Saskatoon and Regina, the two leading cities of Saskatchewan, are leading Canada in terms of growth. Global News reports.

[PHOTO] Two photos of a Heiltsuk canoe, AMNH (@amnh)

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The legend suggested this giant ornate canoe came from the Northwest Coast, most probably from the Heiltsuk of coastal British Columbia.

Heiltsuk canoe (1) #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #firstnations #heiltsuk #canoe #amnh #americanmuseumofnaturalhistory #latergram

Heiltsuk canoe (2) #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #firstnations #heiltsuk #canoe #amnh #americanmuseumofnaturalhistory #latergram

Written by Randy McDonald

February 14, 2018 at 11:15 am

[URBAN NOTE] Six city links: skyscrapers, Queens, Montréal, Vancouver, Gangneung, Amsterdam

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  • CNN reports on the rise of slender skyscrapers, in New York City and elsewhere.
  • VICE notes how badly the temporary shutdown of the L line has been hurting the Queens neighbourhood of Astoria.
  • National Observer wonders what Montréal can do to be friendlier to seniors. (Being open to consulting broader demographics is a good start.)
  • Global News notes concerns in Vancouver that excessive condo development could block the view of the mountains surrounding that metropolis.
  • CBC reports on the South Korean city of Gangneung, a place that has become the locus of that country’s coffee culture.
  • VICE reports on the effect that licenses allowing nightclubs to operate 24 hours a day has had on nightlife in Amsterdam.