A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Archive for the ‘Demographics’ Category

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her rules for life.
  • The Crux explores the development of robots that can learn from each other.
  • JSTOR Daily explores the legal and environmental reasons why commercial supersonic flight never took off.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money imagines what might have been had the F-14 Tomcat never escaped development hell.
  • Peter Watts wonders if, with de-extinction becoming possible, future generations might become even less careful with the environment, knowing they can fix things and never bothering to do so.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw argues that, with MOOCs and multiple careers in a working lifespan, autodidacticism is bound to return.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Marc Rayman looks at the final orbits of the Dawn probe over Ceres and the expected scientific returns.
  • Roads and Kingdoms explores the New Jersey sandwich known, alternatively, as the Taylor ham and the pork roll.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what led to the early universe having an excess of matter over antimatter.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy explores why the California Supreme Court took the trifurcation of California off referendum papers.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how some in independent Azerbaijan fears that Iranian ethnic Azeris might try to subvert the independent country’s secularism.
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[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Amazon Prime, Skyscraper, inclusionary zoning, waterfront, underground

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  • Andray Domise at MacLean’s takes Amazon Prime Day to note the way in which the tech company and others are undermining successful cities.
  • CityLab is unimpressed by the new movie Skyscraper, not least for the opportunities it fails to recognize in the architecture of super-tall buildings.
  • CityLab takes a look at the idea of “inclusionary zoning”, here.
  • Guardian Cities notes that Toronto is not alone in making the mistake of building highways separating city from waterfront.
  • The Guardian Cities takes a fascinating extended look at the questions of mapping and property ownership of the space beneath cities.

[URBAN NOTE] TTC Line 1, Dufferin Street, Bloordale, #TheManWhoSoldParkdale, PR voting

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  • blogTO notes a closure this weekend of Line 1 between St. Clair and Lawrence for Metrolinx construction. Still, at least their post uses my photo!
  • Urban Toronto notes that, the studios at 390 through 444 Dufferin Street being demolished, new construction is begin. I remember those studios from when I first moved to Toronto.
  • Urban Toronto looks at the latest revision to plans to redevelop the southwest corner of Bloor and Dufferin, one intended to install a more human scale to the streetscape and skyline.
  • NOW Toronto takes an extended look at the #TheManWhoSoldParkdale campaign against gentrification in Parkdale.
  • CBC shares the argument in favour of giving permanent residents voting rights in municipal elections in the City of Toronto.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a new image showing the sheer density of events in the core of our galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the discovery of 2MASS 0249 c, a planet-like object that distantly orbits a pair of low-mass brown dwarfs.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of many new moons of Jupiter, bringing the total up to 79.
  • Far Outliers looks at the appeasement practiced by the Times of London in the 1930s.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas contrasts roots with anchors.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the controversy surrounding surviving honours paid to Franco in Spain.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how the question of Macedonia continues to be a threatening issue in the politics of Greece.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests the new Mexican president is trying to create a new political machine, one that can only echo the more far-reaching and unrestrained one of PRI.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at the shifting alliances of different Asian countries with China and the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the Russian reactions to a recent Politico Europe report describing Estonia’s strategies for resisting a Russian invasion in depth.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares the latest images of asteroid Ryugu.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the equal-mass near-Earth asteroid binary 2017 YE5.
  • Far Outliers notes how corrosive fake news and propaganda can be, by looking at Orwell’s experience of the Spanish Civil War.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas looks at swarms versus networks, in the light of Bauman’s thinking on freedom/security.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on how American pharmacy chain PVS fired a man–a Log Cabin Republican, no less–for calling the police on a black customer over a coupon.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper making the case that national service plays a useful role in modern countries.
  • Language Hat quotes from a beautiful Perry Anderson essay at the LRB about Proust.
  • Jeffey Herlihy-Mera writes/u> at Lingua Franca about his first-hand experiences of the multilingualism of Ecuador.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the art created by the prominent members of the Romanov dynasty.
  • The Power and Money’s Noel Maurer has reposted a blog post from 2016 considering the question of just how much money the United States could extract, via military basing, from Germany and Japan and South Korea
  • Window on Eurasia suggests a new Russian language law that would marginalize non-Russian languages is provoking a renaissance of Tatar nationalism.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: The Discourse, First Nations park, Yorkdale, ravines, Parkdale

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  • The Discourse reports on what they have learned about local issues from interviewing people in Toronto. Much appreciated; I hope they get a bigger local footprint here.
  • Toronto’s first First Nations-themed park is being planned for a North York site, at Finch and Weston Road. The City of Toronto reports.
  • Urban Toronto notes the new green and solar roofs being installed at Yorkdale.
  • Shawn Micallef makes the argument that the cold green treed ravines of Toronto are good places to seek refuge from the heat, over at the Toronto Star.
  • It is sad, if perhaps unsurprising, that one tenant participating in a Parkdale rent strike has been issued eviction notices. The Toronto Star reports.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Nathan Burgoine at Apostrophen argues compellingly that stories featuring queer protagonists should also have other queer characters (among other things).
  • James Bow talks about the origins and the progress of his new novel, The Sun Runners.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the recent hopeful analysis of Ross 128b, still a strong candidate for a relatively Earth-like world.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion on having elections in the European Parliament being based on transnational lists.
  • D-Brief notes a hauntingly musical study of the plasma of Saturn’s ring system.
  • Hornet Stories reports on N.K. Jemisin’s article that bigots are not good writers of fiction. I’m inclined to agree: People who cannot imagine the lives of others as legitimate have issues with plausible characterization.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Nicola Sturgeon opened Pride in Glasgow on the same day as Trump’s visit, saying there was where she wanted to be regardless.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the winding history of New York State’s Adirondacks, as a protected area.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the evidence for the unwitting involvement of Glenn Greenwald and Wikileaks as agents of Russia in support of Trump.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle, considers the genesis of the phrase “Sherpas of the Beltway.” How problematic is it?
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that Canadian public opinion in support of open immigration rests on borders being controlled.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that the strange behaviour of Boyajian’s Star can be explained by dust alone.
  • Window on Eurasia speculates that Russia might be on the verge of another wave of regional reorganizations, amalgamating some provinces and other territories into others.
  • Arnold Zwicky points out the achievements of Samantha Allen, a journalist writing for The Daily Beast.