A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Archive for the ‘Demographics’ Category

[URBAN NOTE] Five cities links: Plattsburgh, Montréal, Cincinnati, Palm Springs, Almaty

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  • The New York city of Plattsburgh is trying to limit Bitcoin mining locally, to avoid overusing its low electricity prices. VICE reports.
  • The LA Review of Books shares a story of a visitor’s engagement with the Montréal of Saul Bellow, here.
  • Lyman Stone suggests that Cincinnati, even more than Pittsburgh, is in the middle of a noteworthy renaissance, over at In A State of Migration.
  • Palm Springs, in the California desert, apparently is in the middle of an eye-catching renewal. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Open Democracy looks at this new effort to preserve the Soviet-era architectural heritage of Almaty, Kazakhstan’s old capital city, here.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • At Anthropology.net, Kamzib Kamrani looks at the Yamnaya horse culture of far eastern Europe and their connection to the spread of the Indo-Europeans.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the predicted collision of China’s Tiangong-1 space station. Where will it fall?
  • James Bow notes a Kickstarter funding effort to revive classic Canadian science fiction magazine Amazing Stories.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the impending retirement of the pioneering Kepler telescope, and what’s being done in the time before this retirement.
  • D-Brief notes how nanowires made of gold and titanium were used to restore the sight of blind mice.
  • Russell Darnley takes a look at the indigenous people of Riau province, the Siak, who have been marginalized by (among other things) the Indonesian policy of transmigration.
  • Dead Things reports on more evidence of Denisovan ancestry in East Asian populations, with the suggestion that the trace of Denisovan ancestry in East Asia came from a different Denisovan population than the stronger traces in Melanesia.
  • Hornet Stories paints a compelling portrait of the West Texas oasis-like community of Marfa.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how indigenous mythology about illness was used to solve a hantavirus outbreak in New Mexico in the 1990s.
  • Language Log praises the technical style of a Google Translate translation of a text from German to English.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that, under the Shah, Iran was interested in building nuclear plants. Iranian nuclear aspirations go back a long way.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the unsettling elements of the literary, and other, popularity of Jordan Peterson.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the continuing existence of a glass ceiling even in relatively egalitarian Iceland.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the unsettling elements behind the rise of Xi Jinping to unchecked power. Transitions from an oligarchy to one-man rule are never good for a country, never mind one as big as China.
  • Drew Rowsome writes about Love, Cecil, a new film biography of photographer Cecil Beaton.
  • Peter Rukavina celebrates the 25th anniversary of his move to Prince Edward Island. That province, my native one, is much the better for his having moved there. Congratulations!
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a strange story of Russian speculation about Kazakh pan-Turkic irredentism for Orenburg that can be traced back to one of its own posts.
  • At Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, Frances Woolley takes the time to determine that Canadian university professors tend to be more left-wing than the general Canadian population, and to ask why this is the case.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Markham, Hamilton, London, Detroit and Windsor, Vancouver

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  • Toronto Life takes a look at the new Aaniin community centre in Markham.
  • The Tower, an anarchist centre in Hamilton, got vandalized in turn after a spate of pointless anarchist vandalism on Locke Street. CBC reports.
  • Will the city of London get plugged into a high-speed rail route? One only hopes, and in the interim, one plans. Global News reports.
  • Making the border crossing between Detroit and Windsor a model for Ireland post-Brexit is a terrible idea. CBC reports.
  • Can Vancouver help solve the problem of housing for the young, including students, by having them rent rooms from compatible older folks? Global News examines the proposal.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares some stunning photos of the polar regions of Jupiter, from Juno.
  • Centauri Dreams notes speculation on how antimatter could be harnessed for space propulsion.
  • D-Brief notes how nanotechnological design is used to create tools capable of extracting water from the air above the Atacama.
  • Russell Darnley notes the continuing peat fires in Sumatra’s Riau Province.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes evidence of an ancient cultural diffusion, from Copper Age Iberia, apparently not accompanied by gene flows.
  • Mark Graham links to a paper he co-authored looking at the viability of online work as an option, or not, in the Global South.
  • Hornet Stories notes an upcoming documentary about Harlem fashion figure Dapper Dan.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the surprising controversy around the practice of keeping crickets as pets, for entertainments including music and bloodsports.
  • Language Log looks at the extent to which Xi Jinping actually has been identified as a Tibetan bodhisattva.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the extent to which Mexican society has also experienced negative effects from NAFTA, in ways perhaps not unfamiliar to Americans.
  • Lingua Franca considers the usage of the term “blockbuster”.
  • Neuroskeptic notes a new paper suggesting there is no neurogenesis in adult humans.
  • The NYR Daily features an eyewitness description of a botched execution in Alabama. This one does indeed seem to be particularly barbaric.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the rise of dictatorship worldwide.
  • Roads and Kingdoms <U?considers the simple joys of chilaquiles sandwiches in Guadalajara.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the vast bumber of starless planets, rogue planets, out there in the universe.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative notes the fact, and the political import of the fact, that public-sector wages in Ontario are higher than private-sector ones.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the continuing decline of the Russian village, not helped by recent changes in policy under Putin.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes the difference, in business, between pre- and post-funding investments.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • At Anthropology.net, Kambiz Kamrani notes the Qesem caves of Israel, where four hundred thousand years ago hominids learned to make tools.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that star S2 is about to plunge to its closest approach to Sagittarius A*, the black hole at the heart of our galaxy, and what this means for science.
  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at research done on Earth about the atmospheres of super-Earths.
  • D-Brief takes a look at the recent research done on the regions on the edges of supermassive black holes.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that the Juno science team thinks that Jupiter probe has exceeded expectations.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the evidence for a massive migration from the steppes into Europe circa 3300 BCE.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas makes the argument that the idea of humane technology is something of an oxymoron.
  • Imageo notes evidence that permafrost will melt more quickly than previous predicted under the impact of global warming.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at explanations for the unusually strong activism among high school students in East Los Angeles in the 1960s.
  • Language Hat looks at evidence for the close relationship, in vocabulary and even in grammar, between the Turkish and Western Armenian languages now separated by bad blood.
  • Lingua Franca notes how easy it is to change conventions on language use–like pronouns, say–at a well-functioning institution.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the economic progress made, after a recent lull, by Ghana.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the growing involvement of the United States in small wars in Africa, starting with Niger and Cameroon.
  • Justin Petrone at north! reports on a family visit to his ancestral home of Bari, seeing what little remains of the past there.
  • Peter Rukavina wonders, apropos of a very successful experience shopping online at Amazon, how anyone else will be able to compete.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the difference between mathematics and physics. Where is the line to be drawn?
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs maps obesity in the United States and in Europe.
  • Towleroad reports on the apparent interest of actor Cynthia Nixon in becoming governor of New York.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever is a big fan of A Wrinkle in Time, a movie that is not perfect but is still quite good. I’m curious to see it myself.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on food riots in isolated Turkmenistan.

[NEWS] Five notes on food: pork in Germany, California agriculture, NL clam, Maine lobster, food box

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  • Pork consumption in Germany is dropping, a consequence of changing demographics and changing dietary preferences. Bloomberg reports.
  • Raids on illegal immigrants by ICE have the potential to badly hurt agriculture in California. Bloomberg reports.
  • The story of how an effort to open up the Arctic surf clam fishery of Newfoundland, particularly to natives and non-natives alike became a big mess is sad. The National Post reports.
  • Apparently, to cope with injuries and chronic pain, the lobster fishers of Maine are coping by using heroin. Is this going on in Atlantic Canada, too? VICE reports.
  • Things like the Trump plan to substantially replace fresh foods with boxed non-perishable goods in food stamp problems have happened to Native Americans already. The dietary and health consequences are significantly negative. NPR reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Halifax, Hamilton, Los Angeles, Washington D.C., Damascus

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  • Matthew McClearn describes the exceptional vulnerability of Halifax to sea level rise, and the apparent lack of significant preparation for this event, over at The Globe and Mail.
  • In the wake of a Black Bloc-style attack on businesses in Hamilton’s Locke Street, business owners say this isn’t the first time this has happened in recent months. CBC reports.
  • VICE reports on the nostalgia pervading the few surviving video stores of Los Angeles.
  • Mini Montgomery at Washingtonian notes how conservatives in Washington D.C. are finding dating more difficult these days, what with liberals and Democrats turning them down.
  • The highly selective devastation being visited on parts of Damascus is going to leave irremediable scars. The National Post reports.