A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Archive for the ‘Demographics’ Category

[ISL] Four links from islands, from dividing Ireland, to the Chamorro and Haida, to the Caribbean

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  • Peter Geoghegan writes at Open Democracy about the mess that Brexit has made of Ireland, two decades after the Troubles’ end.
  • Anthrodendum’s Alex Golub notes that a North Korean attack on Guam, among other things, would threaten the Chamorro natives of the island.
  • The Toronto Star carries an excerpt from a book by Mark Dowie looking at how the Haida, of Haida Gwaii, managed to win government recognition of their existence.
  • CBC’s Sameer Chhabra explores how Canadian students at Caribbean medical schools find it very difficult to get jobs back home.

[NEWS] Five science links: Uganda coffee, the cetenophore, the Rapanui, Proxima b, Przybylski’s star

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  • National Geographic reports on how, unchecked, global warming may wreck the coffee industry of Uganda.
  • Aeon notes the nervous system of the ctenophore, product of a separate evolutionary process from our own.
  • Phys.org describes a recent study suggesting Easter Island was not wrecked by ecocide. (The Rapanui were devastated by others, I would add.)
  • Even with an active magnetic field, an Earth-like atmosphere of Proxima Centauri b might be eroded away by flares. Universe Today reports on the climate model making this prediction.
  • Does bizarre Przybylski’s star, HD 101065, contain exotic superheavy elements in its atmosphere? New Scientist wonders.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly re-introduces herself to her readers.
  • Bruce Dorminey shares one man’s theory about how extraterrestrials could use exoplanet sightings to build up a galactic communications network.
  • Far Outliers shares some unusual Japanese words, starting with “amepotu” for American potato.
  • Language Hat takes</a. note of an effort to preserve the Kiowa language.
  • Did the spokeswoman of the NRA threaten to “fisk” the New York Times or threaten something else? Language Log reports.
  • Drew Rowsome notes that, compared to San Francisco, Toronto does not have much of a public kink scene.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines the quantum reasons behind the explosion produced by sodium metal and water.
  • Understanding Society takes rightful issue with The Guardian’s shoddy coverage of Dearborn, Michigan, and that city’s Muslims and/or Arabs.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that Canada is, at last, starting to take in queer refugees from Chechnya.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes the embarrassing support for Jean-Luc Mélenchon for Venezuela. Was opposing the US all he wanted?

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Centauri Dreams notes the exobiological potential of Titamn after the detection of acrylonitrile. Cryogenic life?
  • This guest essay at Lawyers, Guns and Money on the existential problems of Brazil, with politics depending on people not institutions, is a must-read.
  • The LRB Blog considers, in the context of Brexit, what exactly might count for some as a marker of dictatorship.
  • Did the 15th century construction of the Grand Canal in China lead the Ming away from oceanic travel? Marginal Revolution speculates.
  • The NYR Daily considers</a. the disconcertingly thorough and apparently effective of Kagame's Rwanda.
  • Out There explores the reasons why the most massive planets all have the same size.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the 5th anniversary of the arrival of Curiosity on Mars.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that, with regards to Venezuela, the United States has no good options.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the febrile political mood of Kenya.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Putin is making the mistake of seeing the United States through the prism of Russia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes a proposal for British mayors to have representation at Brexit talks makes no sense.

[URBAN NOTE] Four notes about cities, communities: Smiths Falls, Oshawa, Halifax, same-sex couples

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  • I am glad that Smiths Falls survived–it was lovely when I visited in 2003. If it is marijuana that saved it, good. From Global News.
  • That Oshawa–the ‘Shwa, to GTAers–has managed to evolve past dependence on cars is a very good thing indeed. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Can Halifax support the proposed light rail network? This sounds like a good idea, but I would say that, then. Global News describes the proposal.
  • Patrick Cain does a great job analyzing the 2016 Census data on same-sex couples in Canada: distribution, ages, etc. His analysis is at Global News.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from nuclear war to the TTC to poverty to pop culture

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  • Worrying about the relationship of Toronto and nuclear weapons seems very 1980s. What’s old is new again, as noted at NOW Toronto.
  • Steve Munro points out that talk of a fare freeze on the TTC ignores the underlying economics. Who, and what, will pay for this?
  • It’s nice that the Little Free Pantry is being supported, as Global News observes, but what does it say about our city that this is a thing?
  • Clifton Joseph notes the Toronto Caribbean Festival has never achieved its goals of emancipation. Cue Bakhtin …
  • Global News notes the new Drake music video promoting his OVO Fest store at Yorkdale. I should go.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Dangerous Minds points readers to Cindy Sherman’s Instagram account. (“_cindysherman_”, if you are interested.)
  • Language Hat takes note of a rare early 20th century Judaeo-Urdu manuscript.
  • Language Log lists some of the many, many words and phrases banned from Internet usage in China.
  • The argument made at Lawyers, Guns and Money about Trump’s many cognitive defects is frightening. How can he be president?
  • The LRB Blog notes that many traditional Labour voters, contra fears, are in fact willing to vote for non-ethnocratic policies.
  • The NYR Daily describes a book of photos with companion essays by Teju Cole that I like.
  • Of course, as Roads and Kingdom notes, there is such a thing as pho craft beer in Vietnam.
  • Peter Rukavina notes</a. the genetic history of mice in New York City and the beavers of Prince Edward Island.
  • Towleroad notes a love duet between Kele Okereke and Olly Alexander.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy seems unconvinced by the charges against Kronos programmer Marcus Hutchins.