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Archive for the ‘Urban Note’ Category

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes new research on where the sun is located within the Milky Way Galaxy.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the value of slow fashion.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the different gas giants that our early methods have yet to pick up.
  • Crooked Timber shares a lovely photo looking back at Venice from across its lagoon.
  • D-Brief notes that upcoming space telescopes might find hundreds of rogue planets thanks to microlensing.
  • io9 notes that Marvel will soon be producing Warhammer40K comics.
  • The Island Review shares some poetry and photography by Ken Cockburn inspired by the Isle of Jura.
  • JSTOR Daily notes that different humpback whale groups have different songs, different cultures.
  • Language Hat tries to find the meaning of the odd Soviet Yiddish word “kolvirt”.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the history of Elizabeth Warren as a law teacher.
  • Map Room Blog shares information from Google Maps about its use of data.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that in 2016, not a single child born in the United Kingdom was given the name Nigel.
  • Peter Watts talks about AI and what else he is doing.
  • The NYR Daily marked the centennial of a horrible massacre of African-Americans centered on the Arkansas community of Elaine.
  • Emily Margolis at the Planetary Society Blog looks at how the Apollo moon missions helped galvanize tourism in Florida.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money looks at the constitutional crisis in Peru.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at A Streetcar Named Desire.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at a spreadsheet revealing the distribution of PEI public servants.
  • Spacing reviews a book imagining how small communities can rebuild themselves in neoliberalism.
  • Towleroad shares the criticism of Christine and the Queens of the allegedly opportunistic use of queer culture by Taylor Swift.
  • Understanding Society considers, sociologically, the way artifacts work.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy argues that the 70th anniversary of the foundation of the People’s Republic of China should be a day of mourning, on account of the high human toll of the PRC.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests the Russian generation of the 1970s was too small to create lasting change.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at how underwear ads can be quite sexualized.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven Toronto links

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  • blogTO shares photos from Yorkdale Mall during its power outage Saturday.
  • blogTO reports that Toronto hosts, by one measurement, one of the biggest housing bubbles in the world.
  • The story of how a neighbourhood project painted over the Ossington Laneway, vandalizing the graffiti there, is a sad one. blogTO has it.
  • Judging by his filmed confession, the only chance Alek Minassian has to avoid a very lengthy prison sentence is a perhaps-unlikely insanity plea. CBC reports.
  • NOW Toronto reports on the climate strike protests held Friday in Toronto.
  • The Toronto Star reports on the mass protests held on Sunday to keep homophobic Christians from marching into Church and Wellesley.
  • Steve Munro reports on the statistical sleight of hand apparently used to make the TTC Bombardier streetcars of the TTC look better.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer notes the latest news on interstellar comet 2/Borisov.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly emphasizes how every writer does need an editor.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how the gas giant GJ 3512 b, half the mass of Jupiter orbiting a red dwarf star closely, is an oddly massive exoplanet.
  • Gina Schouten at Crooked Timber looks at inter-generational clashes on parenting styles.
  • D-Brief looks at the methods of agriculture that could conceivably sustain a populous human colony on Mars.
  • Bruce Dorminey argues that we on Earth need something like Starfleet Academy, to help us advance into space.
  • Colby King at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at how the socio-spatial perspective helps us understand the development of cities.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res listens to the Paul McCartney album Flaming Pie.
  • io9 looks at Proxima, a contemporary spaceflight film starring Eva Green.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how the intense relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia began in, and reflected, the era of Jim Crow.
  • Language Hat notes a report suggesting that multilingualism helps ward off dementia.
  • Language Log takes issue with the names of the mascots of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the emergence of a ninth woman complaining about being harassed by Al Franken.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a new paper arguing that the Washington Consensus worked.
  • The NYR Daily shares an Aubrey Nolan cartoon illustrating the evacuation of war children in the United Kingdom during the Second World War.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane shares a nice collection of links for digital mapmakers.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at how the European Space Agency supports the cause of planetary defense.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Kenyan writer Kevin Mwachiro at length.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on how a mysterious fast radio burst helped illuminate an equally mysterious galactic halo.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious and unsolved death in 1936 of Canadian student Thomas Moss in an Oxfordshire hayrick.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes how Mount Etna is a surpassingly rare decipoint.
  • Understanding Society considers the thought of Kojève, after Hegel, on freedom.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the falling numbers of Russians, and of state support for Russian language and culture, in independent Central Asia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how individual consumer responses are much less effective than concerted collective action in triggering change.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on some transgender fashion models.

[URBAN NOTE] Five notes about cities: parks, productivity, suburbs, borders, libraries

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  • CityLab looks at a new study examining the relationship between gentrification and new city parks.
  • Guardian Cities looks at the hardest-working cities in the world, and wonders if that duration of work is a good idea.
  • The Conversation looks at how population growth in Canada is increasingly concentrated in car-dependent suburbs.
  • VICE looks at how arbitrary municipal borders in built-up areas can have nasty effects on the lives of people caught up by them.
  • Rabble reports on how Canadian libraries are handling the opioid crisis.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: wealth, east-end, marijuana, 1930, ride-hailing

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  • blogTO notes that Toronto is getting richer even as the rest of Canada is getting poorer, though growth in Toronto is driven by debt.
  • Steve Munro looks at the ongoing reconstruction of the intersection of Kingston Road and Queen.
  • blogTO looks at the reopening of an illegal cannabis store.
  • Jamie Bradburn looks at the different ways mass media in 1930 Toronto shared election results.
  • Nicholas Sanderson writes at Spacing about what other cities can learn from the experience of Toronto with ride-hailing apps.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Ottawa, Moncton, New York City, Calgary, Richmond

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  • The Ottawa Citizen reports on the first week of the Confederation Line LRT.
  • The New Brunswick city of Moncton now has new affordable housing–20 units–for vulnerable people. Global News reports.
  • CityLab looks at one photographer’s perspective of the New York City skyline, changed by the 9/11 attacks.
  • An alleyway in Calgary is being transformed by art. Global News reports.
  • Birth tourism might become an election issue in the British Columbia city of Richmond. Global News reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Montréal links: Ariel Kouakou, Depanneur, STM, Pointe Claire, U of M

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  • CBC Montreal notes how there is now a mural in memory of missing child Ariel Kouakou in a east-end Rosemont alley.
  • CultMTL takes a look at an odd convenience store hidden in the basement of an apartment block near McGill University, here.
  • CBC Montreal notes how mass transit is the top priority for mayor Valérie Plante, here.
  • An archeological dig near Pointe Claire is revealing ruins dating back to the time of New France. Global News reports.
  • CBC Montreal looks at the new campus of the Université de Montréal, and controversy over its transformation of neighbourhoods.