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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘africa

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of dispatching a fleet of sail-equipped probes to map the asteroid belt.
  • Crux considers the importance of the invention of zero for mathematics.
  • D-Brief notes that Scotland’s oldest snow patch is set to melt imminently.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at the stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters.
  • Imageo notes the modest recovery of icecaps in the Arctic this summer.
  • Language Log notes the importance of Kazakhstan’s shift to using the Latin script for the Kazakh language.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a writer’s visit to Helsinki.
  • The Map Room Blog notes a giant relief map of Guatemala, built to reinforce claims to what is now Belize.
  • The NYR Daily considers the continued salience of race in the fragile liberal-democratic world, in America and Europe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if the heavy-handed Spanish government is trying to trigger Catalonian independence.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the palm wine of Senegal, and its vendors.
  • Understanding Society considers the Holocaust, as an experience sociological and otherwise.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a libertarian case for open borders.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi celebrates his meeting mutual fan Alison Moyet.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus’ cautious Belarusianization is met by Russia’s pro-Soviet nostalgia.
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[NEWS] Four links about problematic history: swastika, Cornwallis River, castle restoration, humans

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  • MacLean’s argues that, in Canada and arguably the West generally, it is much too soon to rehabilitate the swastika.
  • Global News reports on a proposal to rename Nova Scotia’s Cornwallis River.
  • This effort to engage in a minimalist, non-misleading restoration of a Spanish castle is controversial.
  • The argument that human history goes back millions of years, and encompass a huger area than thought, is compelling.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • At Anthrodendum, P. Kerim Friedman talks about the technologies he uses to help him navigate Chinese-speaking Taiwan.
  • Dead Things notes new dating showing the Neanderthals of Vindija cave, in Croatia, were much older than thought.
  • Far Outliers takes a brief look at the history of Temasek, the Malay polity that once thrived in Singapore.
  • Hornet Stories shares photos from New York City’s Afropunk festival.
  • Imageo shows the scale of the devastating wildfires in the western United States, with satellite photos.
  • Language Hat looks at the sort of mistakes characteristic of medieval manuscripts written in Latin and Greek.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at Trump’s revocation of DACA and the harm that will face the Dreamers. I am so sorry.
  • Maximos62 looks at a new book examining how biologists, including Darwin and Wallace, came to draw a borer between Asia and Australia.
  • Peter Rukavina blogs about his visit to Wheatley River’s Island Honey Wine Company. (Mead, it seems.)
  • Strange Company takes a look at the life of violent war-mongering British eccentric Alfred Wintle.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the very poor state of sex education in Russia’s education system.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining a potential relationship between stars’ magnetic fields and exoplanets.
  • Hornet Stories links to the Instagram account of Tom Bianchi, still taking photos of Fire Island.
  • Language Hat notes the death of Ognen Cemerski, a Macedonian who went to heroic lengths to translate Moby Dick into his language.
  • Language Log notes an unusual hybrid Sino-Tibetan sign for a restaurant.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is appropriately savage with Hillbilly Elegy (at least of uncritical readings of said).
  • Marginal Revolutions links to a paper noting French cities, unlike British ones, are much more tightly tied to old Roman settlements, away from the sea.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw calls for the return of the Australian $2 bill.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the aftermath of rampant electoral fraud in Angola. What will come next?
  • Drew Rowsome takes a stand against, particularly in the context of Stephen King’s It, the now-common fear of clowns.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at Erik Olin Wright’s thinking on possible utopias.
  • Window on Eurasia notes potential contributions of Russophone Belarusians and Ukrainians to the Russophone world, and notes some controversy in Moscow re: widely-observed Muslim holidays at start of the school year.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams analyzes the latest suggestive findings about water on potentially habitable exoplanets of TRAPPIST-1.
  • A Game of Thrones-themed cat bed, as described by Dangerous Minds, is almost tempting. (Almost.)
  • Hornet Stories takes a brief look at what the Nazis were like for, and did to, queers.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Texas’ secretary of state turned down an aid offer from Québec, asking only for prayers.
  • Language Hat looks at the ways in which different African writers have glossed Africa in their works.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper looking at the effect that serious floods have on cities’ long-run economic growth.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes the discovery of sunken garum-exporting Neapolis off of the coast of Tunisia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the latest ventures of the Opportunity rover as winter approaches on Mars.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes the Café Touba coffee of Senegal, sign of resistance to colonialism and globalization.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a proposal in Russia to memorialize Muslims who resisted changing traditional value systems.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Charley Ross reflects on the story of Carla Vicentini, a Brazilian apparently abducted from New Jersey a decade ago.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog reflects on the concept of anomie.
  • Far Outliers looks at the southwest Pacific campaigns of 1942, and reflects on Australian-American tensions in New Guinea in the Second World War.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reflects briefly on the disaster in Houston.
  • The Map Room Blog links to two interesting longform takes on maps in fantasy.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers the extent to which urban policy has contributed to Houston’s issues.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells the story of a Shabbat celebration in Zimbabwe, and of the country’s Jewish community.
  • Strange Company tells the story of the mysterious disappearance of Lieutenant Paul Byron Whipkey. What was done to him?
  • Unicorn Booty reports on how the Supreme Court of India has found people have a legal right to their orientation.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the growing number of Russian citizens with Chinese connections.
  • Arnold Zwicky talks about Tom Bianchi’s vintage Fire Island photos.

[NEWS] Four science links, from water on the frontier to climate change to Tau Ceti exoplanets

  • At Wired, Matt Simon explores the remarkably wrong-headed theory of the 19th century US that “rain follows the plough.”
  • These National Geographic photos of the unexplored lakes in Angola that feed the Okavango are remarkable.
  • Rachel Brown examines billy burr, the Colorado hermit whose collection of decades of climate data is invaluable.
  • Universe Today notes a new study confirming the existence of Tau Ceti e and f, potentially habitable rocky exoplanets just 12 light years away.

Written by Randy McDonald

August 9, 2017 at 10:59 pm