A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘african-americans

[NEWS] Five NYR Daily links: Colombia, slavery, churches, journalism, Shakespeare&Co (@nyr_daily)

  • The NYR Daily shares a report from Colombia, about the ways in which the filling of the Hidroituango Dam interacts with Colombia’s other social and political issues, here.
  • Sean Wilentz makes the compelling argument at the NYR Daily that the young United States was a critical venue for antislavery movements, here.
  • The NYR Daily tells the stories of two churches, one white and one black, as they merge, here.
  • The NYR Daily shares the stories of a half-dozen pioneering, but overlooked, black woman journalists in the United States, here.
  • Caitlin O’Keefe tells at the NYR Daily of how Paris bookstore Shakespeare and Company played a key role in the growth of feminism, here.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Architectuul looks at the Porto architectural project Critical Concrete, here.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares the evidence for our galaxy having experienced a phase as a quasar a quarter-million years long some 3.5 million years ago.
  • Author James Bow celebrates the end of his publicity tour for The Night Girl, including a controversy over cover art featuring the CN Tower.
  • Robert Zubrin at Centauri Dreams considers how we could detect energy from artificial singularities used for power and propulsion. (Is this how we find the Romulans?)
  • The Crux considers whether or not the new proposals for more powerful supercolliders in China and Europe are likely to produce new discoveries.
  • D-Brief explains why older generations so often look down on the young: The elders idealize their younger selves too much.
  • Dead Things notes new evidence, in the tracks of trilobites moving in line 480 million years ago, for early life being able to engage in collective behaviour.
  • io9 interviews Kami Garcia about her new YA book featuring venerable DC character Raven, remaking her for new readers.
  • The Island Review interviews David Gange about The Frayed Atlantic Edge, his book account of his kayak trip down the western coasts of Britain and Ireland.
  • JSTOR Daily explains why Martin Luther King Jr. thought so highly of jazz.
  • Eleanor Penny argues at the LRB Blog against taking Malthus, with his pessimism trending towards a murderous misanthropy, as a prophet for our times.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the play American Moor, which touches on the efforts of black actors to engage with Shakespeare.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the new film The Flick, an old to old-style movies and theatres.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a map depicting Hutterite migrations across early modern Europe.
  • Starts With A Bang shares new speculation that some evidence for dark matter might actually be a mistake in measurement.
  • Strange Maps notes the now mostly submerged continent of Greater Adria.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a suggestion that the deep Russophilia of many ordinary people in Belarus might support union with Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the different meanings of “unaccompanied”.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Hamilton, Montréal, Lorain, Buenos Aires, Jakarta

  • Tensions between the LGBTQ communities of Hamilton and the police remain high. Global News reports.
  • The federal government will be providing funding for the new Great West Park of Montréal. CTV News reports.
  • CityLab looks at the hometown of Toni Morrison, the Ohio community of Lorain, here.
  • Guardian Cities looks at the question of how, or whether, a Buenos Aires slum should become an official neighbourhood, here.
  • Guardian Cities reports on a small neighbourhood, Cosmo Park, built on top of a shopping mall in Jakarta, here.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Saira Mehmood blogs at {anthro}dendum about her experiences as an ethnographer in her New Orleans community.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait blogs about Supernova 2016iet, a rare example of a pair-instability supernova.
  • At the Broadside Blog, Caitlin Kelly writes about the need of people to avoid isolation.
  • Centauri Dreams notes that future astronomers might be able to detect the fluorescence of life on exoplanets during flares.
  • Why, Crooked Timber asks, shouldn’t children be given the vote?
  • D-Brief notes scientists have manufactured a ring of carbon atoms.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the complexities of #VanLife in the United States, at once a lifestyle choice in the US and a response to poverty.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is decidedly unimpressed by the recent rewriting of the Statue of Liberty.
  • Neuroskeptic looks at how neuroimaging studies study surprisingly few left-handers, and how this is a problem.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how Big Data in China is enhancing state power, concentrating on the situation in Xinjiang.
  • Drew Rowsome looks at a new documentary on the genesis of Fiddler on the Roof, Fiddler: Miracle of Miracles.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how dark matter and black holes can interact.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at coded anti-black racism in the 1937 United States.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Architectuul notes the recent death of I.M. Pei.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes what, exactly, rubble-pile asteroids are.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about definitions of home.
  • Centauri Dreams considers white dwarf planets.
  • The Crux notes how ultra-processed foods are liked closely to weight gain.
  • D-Brief observes that a thin layer of insulating ice might be saving the subsurface oceans of Pluto from freezing out.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the critical role played by Apollo 10 in getting NASA ready for the Moon landings.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the American government’s expectation that China will seek to set up its own global network of military bases.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina reports on the Soviet Union’s Venera 5 and 6 missions to Venus.
  • Far Outliers looks at the visit of U.S. Grant to Japan and China.
  • Gizmodo notes a recent analysis of Neanderthal teeth suggesting that they split with Homo sapiens at a date substantially earlier than commonly believed.
  • io9 notes the sheer scale of the Jonathan Hickman reboots for the X-Men comics of Marvel.
  • Joe. My. God. shares the argument of Ted Cruz that people should stop making fun of his “space pirate” suggestion.I am inclined to think Cruz more right than not, actually.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the wave of anti-black violence that hit the United States in 1919, often driven by returned veterans.
  • Language Hat shares a recognizable complaint, written in ancient Akkadian, of bad customers.
  • Language Log shares a report of a village in Brittany seeking people to decipher a mysterious etching.
  • This Scott Lemieux report at Lawyers, Guns and Money about how British conservatives received Ben Shapiro is a must-read summary.
  • Benjamin Markovits at the LRB Blog shares the reasons why he left his immigrant-heavy basketball team in Germany.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at one effort in Brazil to separate people from their street gangs.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how ISIS, deprived of its proto-state, has managed to thrive as a decentralized network.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw tells of his experiences and perceptions of his native region of New England, in southeastern Australia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes how the Chang’e 4 rover may have found lunar mantle on the surface of the Moon.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that while Argentine president Mauricio Macri is polling badly, his opponents are not polling well.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares a list of things to do in see in the Peru capital of Lima.
  • The Signal examines how the Library of Congress engages in photodocumentation.
  • Van Waffle at the Speed River Journal explains how he is helping native insects by planting native plants in his garden.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how scientific illiteracy should never be seen as cool.
  • Towleroad notes the questions of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez as to why Truvada costs so much in the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how family structures in the North Caucasus are at once modernizing and becoming more conservative.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes how the distribution of US carriers and their fleets at present does not support the idea of a planned impending war with Iran.
  • Arnold Zwicky examines the tent caterpillar of California.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Ingrid Robeyns at Crooked Timber takes us from her son’s accidental cut to the electronic music of Røbic.
  • D-Brief explains what the exceptional unexpected brightness of the first galaxies reveals about the universe.
  • Far Outliers looks at how President Grant tried to deal with the Ku Klux Klan.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the surprising influence of the Turkish harem on the fashion, at least, of Western women.
  • This Kotaku essay arguing that no one should be sitting on the Iron Throne makes even better sense to me now.
  • Language Hat looks at the particular forms of French spoken by the famously Francophile Russian elites of the 19th century.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how teaching people to code did not save the residents of an Appalachia community.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how, in the early 19th century, the young United States trading extensively with the Caribbean, even with independent Haiti.
  • At the NYR Daily, Colm Tóibín looks at the paintings of Pat Steir.
  • Peter Rukavina writes about how he has been inspired by the deaths of the Underhays to become more active in local politics.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society shares his research goals from 1976.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the conflicts between the Russian Orthodox Church and some Russian nationalists over the latter’s praise of Stalin.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at dragons in history, queer and otherwise.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Larry Claes at Centauri Dreams considers the issues of the alien featuring in the title of the classic The Thing, facing human persecution.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber starts a debate about past blogging and conventional wisdom.
  • The Crux reports on a mass rescue of orphaned flamingo chicks in South Africa.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence that asteroids provided perhaps half of the Earth’s current supply of water.
  • Cody Delistraty looks at how the far-right in Germany is appropriating artworks to support its view of history.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that China may be hoping to build a base at the Moon’s south pole by 2029.
  • Far Outliers reports on the 1865 collapse of the Confederacy.
  • Gizmodo reports on how astronomers have identified the approximate location of a kilonova that seeded the nascent solar system with heavy elements.
  • Joe. My. God. shares the news from yet another study demonstrating that HIV cannot be transmitted by HIV-undetectable people. U=U.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how, via Herb Caen, the Beat Generation became known as Beatniks.
  • Language Hat shares and comments upon a passage from Dostoevsky noting how an obscenity can be stretched out into an entire conversation.
  • Language Log considers a peculiarity of the Beijing dialect.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how statehood has been used to game the American political system.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that countries with greater levels of gender inequality are more likely to produce female chess grandmasters.
  • Justin Petrone at North!, considering the history of writers in Estonia, considers what the mission of the writer should be.
  • The NYR Daily examines the black people once miners in the Kentucky town of Lynch, remembering and sharing their experiences.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw considers what he has learned from a recent research and writing contract.
  • Jason C. Davis at the Planetary Society Blog reports in greater detail on the crater Hayabusa 2 made in asteroid Ryugu.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how the Event Horizon Telescope acts like a mirror.
  • Strange Company shares an impressively diverse collection of links.
  • Towleroad talks with writer Tim Murphy about his new novel, Correspondents.
  • Window on Eurasia considers future directions for Ukrainian language policy.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at the artistic riches horded by the Nazis in the Bavarian castle of Neuschwanstein.