A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘agriculture

[NEWS] Four science lnks: Lake Erie, Great Lakes Water Walk, robotic agriculture, carbon on Earth

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  • Lake Erie, National Geographic notes, is experiencing regular massive algae blooms.
  • Adria Vasil talks about her experience taking part in the recent Great Lakes Water Walk, over at NOW Toronto.
  • Atlas Obscura has more about that drone-harvested field of barley in England.
  • The early Earth got much less carbon than it might have been expected to from the early solar system. Universe Today reports.
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Written by Randy McDonald

October 5, 2017 at 10:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • The Crux considers the idea that lower food consumption can lead to greater longevity.
  • D-Brief notes an English field of barley grown entirely by robots.
  • Language Hat wonders if Brexit means that EU English will start to diverge from the norms of the United Kingdom.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an article taking issue with sports fans’ treatment of players.
  • The LRB Blog notes that Nicaragua has signed up to climate-change accords, leaving only the United States.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new atlas of the Irish Revolution.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that the economy of Turkey is doing surprisingly well.
  • The Planetary Society Blog takes a look at the sorts of technology needed to survive on Mars.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics, for their detection of gravitational waves.
  • Towleroad shares Mashrou’ Leila’s condemnation of Egyptian authorities for arresting people waving the rainbow flag.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes, in passing, the hard work needed to keep artificial intelligences from being racist.
  • Arnold Zwicky links to an interactive map of the bookstores of San Francisco.

[ISL] Four Hawai’i links: Molokai, nuclear attack, doctor shortages, coffee leaf tea

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  • Up to a third of the island of Molokai, in Hawaii, is for sale, but the land comes with strings attached. Bloomberg reports.
  • Threats from North Korea are encouraging people in Hawaii to consider how to minimize risks of nuclear attack. The National Post reports.
  • Most Hawaiian islands, save Kauai, are apparently facing a growing shortage of doctors. U.S. News and World Report looks at the issue.
  • I strongly approve of the idea of coffee leaf tea becoming the next big thing for agriculture in Hawaii. This press release hints at encouraging potential.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 27, 2017 at 7:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross bets that barring catastrophe, the US under Trump will dispatch crewed circumlunar flights.
  • D-Brief takes a look at the evolution of birds, through speculation on how the beak formed.
  • Language Log looks at the ways Trump is represented, and mocked, in the languages of East Asia.
  • Noting the death toll in a Mexico City sweatshop, Lawyers, Guns and Money reiterates that sweatshops are dangerous places to work.
  • The NYR Daily notes the many structural issues likely to prevent foreign-imposed fixes in Afghanistan.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from a seemingly unlikely date festival held in the depths of the Saudi desert.
  • Rocky Planet reports that Mount Agung, a volcano in Indonesia, is at risk of imminent eruption.
  • Drew Rowsome notes a new stage adaptation in Toronto of the Hitchcock classic, North by Northwest.
  • Strange Company reports on how the Lonergans disappeared in 1998 in a dive off the Great Barrier Reef. What happened to them?
  • Towleroad notes how Chelsea Manning was just banned from entering Canada.
  • Window on Eurasia claims that the Russian language is disappearing from Armenia.
  • Arnold Zwicky maps the usage of “faggot” as an obscenity in the United States.

[PHOTO] Fields of Cavendish, PEI

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Cavendish’s Friendly Lane, a street meandering off of Route 13 just east of the intersection with Route 6, is most famous as the street home to Canadian senator Mike Duffy, he who had been acquitted of charges of misusing public funds and of misrepresenting his residency on the island. There are other things to Friendly Lane, like nice views: if one looks to the east, across the green fields with cylindrical bales of hale stretching down to the Gulf of St. Lawrence, one would scarcely be displeased. It would be a nice place to live, at least in summer when the Gulf is not ice and the cold winds would not be blowing onto shore.

Fields of Cavendish (1)

Fields of Cavendish (2)

Fields of Cavendish (3)

Written by Randy McDonald

September 26, 2017 at 3:00 pm

[NEWS] Five notes about things splitting apart: Catalonia, First Nations, Brexit, NAFTA, Iceland

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  • If the separatists of Catalonia are triggering a confrontation with the Spanish government to create a majority … Open Democracy reports.
  • Speaking as someone who could be classified as a settler himself, positioning myself and my arguments is key. MacLean’s notes the importance of sensitivity to First Nations issues.
  • The United Kingdom does seem likely to get the selective access to the EU’s markets post-Brexit some want. Bloomberg reports.
  • Expensive avocado exports are but some of the complications that could hit North America if NAFTA gets changed. Bloomberg reports.
  • Iceland, again, is displaying particular caution towards potentially overwhelming Chinese investment projects. Bloomberg reports.

[NEWS] Five science and technology links: Darjeeling tea, Fitbits, cannabis, PrEP, Planet Nine

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  • Climate change is making the famous tea of Darjeeling much more difficult to come by. VICE reports.
  • Wired notes Fitbits are useful tracking devices for scientists engaged in studies, too. (I always wear mine.)
  • I entirely approve of this new Niagara College program. Why not legalize and professionalize cannabis agriculture?
  • This VICE interview with bringing the Truvada needed for inexpensive PrEP across the border into Canada is of note.
  • A new study suggests that Planet Nine, if it exists, was likely not captured by the young sun but formed here. Universe Today reports.