A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘agriculture

[NEWS] Five US-Canada trade war links: Paikin, Heinz vs French’s, maps, blame

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  • Steve Paikin explains why, in an era of Trump and trade wars, he is not taking his family to visit the United States this year, over at his blog.
  • Heinz’s ketchup, imported from American manufacturing plants, is at risk of losing serious ground to Ontario-manufactured French’s. CBC reports.
  • Brian Crowley and Sean Speer at MacLean’s suggest that Canada is not blameless in the trade war, though I disagree strongly with their lumping in of efforts to build strong ties with China into this.
  • Global News provides animated maps showing how vulnerable Canada is to trade wars with the United States, more so than the US, here.
  • John Lorinc at The Walrus makes the defensible argument that Canada’s vulnerability to the United States’ is product of an overconcentration on the American market.
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Written by Randy McDonald

July 11, 2018 at 11:15 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Pickering, Durham, Delta, Cairo, Yarmouk

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  • Angela Bischoff at NOW Toronto is right to make the point/u> that the disposal of the nuclear waste from the Pickering plant is a major issue, though I do not think this waste disproves the case for the plant.
  • Durham Region is set to experience something of a marijuana boom when cannabis production becomes legalized. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The mayor of the British Columbian community of Delta is concerned marijuana might displace food production on scarce, and wants regulation to prevent this. Global News reports.
  • Mother Jones notes the terrible damage that Ben Carson has inflicted, as housing secretary, on low-income residents of a development in embattled Cairo, Illinois.
  • Open Democracy’s Budour Hassan pays tribute to Yarmouk, a Palestinian refugee camp in Syria recently destroyed by the civil war that once was a capital of the diaspora.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Anthro{dendum}’s Adam Fish looks at the phenomenon of permissionless innovation as part of a call for better regulation.
  • James Bow shares excerpts from his latest book, The Cloud Riders.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how data from Voyager 1’s cosmic ray detectors has been used to study dark matter.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money begins a dissection of what Roe vs Wade meant, and means, for abortion in the United States, and what its overturn might do.
  • Ilan Stavans, writing for Lingua Franca at the Chronicle, considers the languages of the World Cup. The prominence of Spanish in the United States is particularly notable.
  • The LRB Blog gathers together articles referencing the now-departed Boris Johnson. What a man.
  • The Map Room Blog reports/u> on Matthew Blackett’s remarkably intricate transit map of Canada.
  • Alex Tabarrok at Marginal Revolution links to a study from Nature exploring how shifts in the definition of concepts like racism and sexism means that, even as many of the grossest forms disappear, racism and sexism continue to be recognized if in more minute form.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how a Japanese experiment aimed at measuring proton decay ended up inaugurating the era of neutrino astronomy, thanks to SN1987A.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on how a Russian proposal to resettle Afrikaner farmers from South Africa to the North Caucasus (!) is, unsurprisingly, meeting with resistance from local populations, including non-Russian ones.
  • Linguist Arnold Zwicky takes a look at how, exactly, one learns to use the F word.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • At Anthro{dendum}, Daniel Miller writes about how some of the food he cooks evokes his history in Cuba-influenced Tampa.
  • Bad Astronomer notes an astonishingly high-resolution image of protoplanet Vesta taken from the Earth.
  • The Big Picture shares photos of the Kakuma refugee camp, in Kenya.
  • Centauri Dreams notes one proposal to help extend the life of a Type III civilization in the Milky Way Galaxy by importing stars from outside of the local group.
  • Crooked Timber’s Corey Robin talks about changing minds in politics, inspired by the success of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.
  • Dangerous Minds shares the 1978 BBC documentary on surrealism, Europe After the Rain.
  • Far Outliers shares the third part of a summary of an article on African and Japanese mercenaries in Asia.
  • Hornet Stories reports on the regret of Buffy showrunner Martin Noxon that her show killed off Tara. (I agree: I liked her.)
  • At In Medias Res, Russell Arben Fox wonders what American farmers–by extension, perhaps, other farmers in other high-income societies–want. With their entire culture being undermine, what can they hope for?
  • Joe. My. God. notes how far-right groups in Europe are increasingly welcoming lesbian, gay, and bisexual members. (Not so much trans people, it seems.)
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the obvious utility of the humble beaver (in its North American homelands, at least).
  • Language Log considers the politics of the national language policy of China.
  • This Language Hat articlereporting on a conference on xenolinguistics, and the discussion in the comments, is fascinating. What can we hope to learn about non-human language? What will it have, and have not, in common?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers the slow corruption of independent institutions in Mexico that may occur under the presidency of AMLO.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, while we have not found life on Enceladus, we have found indicators of a world that could support life.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Russia is increasingly at risk of being displaced in Central Asia by a dynamic Kazakhstan.

[META] Eight new news sources

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It’s time to add new links and news sources to my blogroll, ones reflecting my interests.

  • CityLab is a great news source looking at different urban phenomena within individual cities and uniting cities. CityLab hosts Sam Weber’s article looking at the many problems facing North Korean defectors as they try to assimilate into ultra-sophisticated Seoul.
  • The Conversation CA hosts Stephen Scherer’s article explaining the importance of sequencing the genomes of Canadian animals.
  • The Discourse is a new Canadian media start-up promising in-depth coverage on Canadian issues. Before the recent Ontario election, they started a hashtag, #GTADiscourse, to see what people in the GTA underserved by the media were concerned about.
  • The Guardian Cities takes a look at urban issues around the world. I liked this Mireille Silcoff article explaining the import of 1 July to the inhabitants of Montréal: It’s moving day!
  • Steve Benjamins hosts Village, a new subscriber-only newsletter focusing on Toronto. I liked this article about a Seaton Village beekeeper, here.
  • The venerable hard-left Canadian news site Rabble has plenty of thought-provoking articles, like Barâa Arar’s essay explaining their fear of what a Doug Ford government in Ontario might do.
  • American queer magazine Them has plenty of great articles. I liked this one confirming that Tessa Thompson, Valkyrie in Thor and Janelle Monáe’s rumoured girlfriend, is out as bi.
  • Toronto website and discussion forum Urban Toronto reports on a massive mural set to grace the Parkside Student Residences at Jarvis and Carlton.

[URBAN NOTE] Twelve Toronto links

  • Edward Keenan is entirely right to praise the idea of exploring the cherry blossoms of Toronto by foot. The Toronto Star has it.
  • Mark Cullen noted last week the struggle to keep what may be the oldest tree in Toronto, a red soak more than three centuries old, alive, over at the Toronto Star.
  • John Tory is quite right to note that Toronto needs to prepare for possible surges of refugees. CBC reports.
  • A Scarborough mansion that has been abandoned for years has just sold for $C 3.8 million. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The infamous Giraffe building on the northwest corner of Dundas West and Bloor may be set to disappear, finally, under a wave of new construction there. Toronto Life reports.
  • blogTO makes the case that west-end Rogers Road is becoming the new centre of the Portuguese-Canadian community, here.
  • Orfus Road, off Dufferin Street near Yorkdale, is a place to go for outlet stores and discounted merchandise. blogTO notes.
  • The TTC has cancelled its weekend closures of parts of different subway routes after disputes with the union. The Toronto Star reports.
  • By one metric, Toronto falls behind only New York City in the race for the Amazon HQ2. The Toronto Star reports.
  • NOW Toronto tells the story of someone who grew marijuana in their backyard, here.
  • An AI Weiwei show will be coming to Toronto in 2019. NOW Toronto reports.
  • Peter Knegt profiles Toronto drag queen Sofonda Cox, over at CBC.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait suggests that strange markings in the upper atmosphere of Venus might well be evidence of life in that relatively Earth-like environment.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly raves over Babylon Berlin.
  • Centauri Dreams considers, fifty years after its publication, Clarke’s 2001.
  • Crooked Timber considers Kevin Williamson in the context of conservative intellectual representation more generally.
  • D-Brief considers “digisexuality”, the fusion of the digital world with sexuality. (I think we’re quite some way off, myself.)
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers evidence suggesting that the agricultural revolution in ancient Anatolia was achieved without population replacement from the Fertile Crescent.
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the flight of Apollo 6, a flight that helped iron out problem with the Saturn V.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas is not impressed by the idea of the trolley problem, as something that allows for the displacement of responsibility.
  • Gizmodo explains why the faces of Neanderthals were so different from the faces of modern humans.
  • JSTOR Daily considers if volcano-driven climate change helped the rise of Christianity.
  • Language Log considers, after Spinoza, the idea that vowels are the souls of consonants.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money engages in a bit of speculation: What would have happened had Clinton won? (Ideological gridlock, perhaps.)
  • Lovesick Cyborg explores how the advent of the cheap USB memory stick allowed North Koreans to start to enjoy K-Pop.
  • Russell Darnley considers the transformation of the forests of Indonesia’s Riau forest from closed canopy forest to plantations.
  • The Map Room Blog shares some praise of inset maps.
  • Neuroskeptic considers how ketamine may work as an anti-depressant.
  • The NYR Daily considers student of death, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross.
  • Justin Petrone of north! shares an anecdote from the Long Island coastal community of Greenport.
  • Personal Reflection’s Jim Belshaw considers the iconic Benjamin Wolfe painting The Death of General Wolfe.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Casey Dreier notes cost overruns for the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • pollotenchegg maps recent trends in natural increase and decrease in Ukraine.
  • Roads and Kingdoms talks about a special Hverabrauð in Iceland, baked in hot springs.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares his own proposal for a new Drake Equation, revised to take account of recent discoveries.
  • Vintage Space considers how the American government would have responded if John Glenn had died in the course of his 1962 voyage into space.
  • Window on Eurasia considers the belief among many Russians that had Beria, not Khrushchev, succeeded Stalin, the Soviet Union might have been more successful.