A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘agriculture

[NEWS] Four science links, from water on the frontier to climate change to Tau Ceti exoplanets

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  • At Wired, Matt Simon explores the remarkably wrong-headed theory of the 19th century US that “rain follows the plough.”
  • These National Geographic photos of the unexplored lakes in Angola that feed the Okavango are remarkable.
  • Rachel Brown examines billy burr, the Colorado hermit whose collection of decades of climate data is invaluable.
  • Universe Today notes a new study confirming the existence of Tau Ceti e and f, potentially habitable rocky exoplanets just 12 light years away.

Written by Randy McDonald

August 9, 2017 at 10:59 pm

[NEWS] Five science links: Uganda coffee, the cetenophore, the Rapanui, Proxima b, Przybylski’s star

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  • National Geographic reports on how, unchecked, global warming may wreck the coffee industry of Uganda.
  • Aeon notes the nervous system of the ctenophore, product of a separate evolutionary process from our own.
  • Phys.org describes a recent study suggesting Easter Island was not wrecked by ecocide. (The Rapanui were devastated by others, I would add.)
  • Even with an active magnetic field, an Earth-like atmosphere of Proxima Centauri b might be eroded away by flares. Universe Today reports on the climate model making this prediction.
  • Does bizarre Przybylski’s star, HD 101065, contain exotic superheavy elements in its atmosphere? New Scientist wonders.

[NEWS] Four links on Canada, from economics to language to poverty to greenhouses

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  • Bloomberg reports on how Canada-Mexico relations will be tested by NAFTA and Trump.
  • Canada, the 2016 Census reported, is marked by noteworthy linguistic diversity (Tagalog does particularly well.)
  • Vice notes how Galen Weston’s opposition to the minimum wage increase for workers at Loblaws is not in his self-interest.
  • Vice’s Motherboard looks at how greenhouse agriculture in Nunavut could help drastically reduce food insecurity in that territory.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from Bakhtinian Caribana to climate and environment to Leslie Spit

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  • Spacing hosts Cheryl Thompson’s article examining Toronto’s Caribbean festival as a Bakhtinian organized chaos.
  • VICE examines how social housing in Canada will be hard-hit by climate change, including rising temperatures.
  • Torontoist shares a sponsored guide to attractions in the Ontario Greenbelt.
  • Laura Howells at the Toronto Star notes that if garlic mustard has to be an invasive plant in the forests of Ontario, at least it helps that it is a tasty invader.
  • Julien Gignac reports on the mystery of who the artist building shrines at Leslie Spit actually is.

[ISL] Three notes on Prince Edward Island, changing and otherwise

  • CBC Prince Edward Island notes that, although down from its 1999 peak, PEI is still Canada’s top potato producer.
  • Strong demand and limited supply means that the Island’s real estate market is tight, with rising prices. CBC Prince Edward Island reports.
  • Meagan Campbell writes in MacLean’s about two of the Island’s newest migrant groups, Amish from Ontario and Buddhist monks from East Asia.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The anthropology group blog Savage Minds now has a new name, Anthrodendum.
  • Anthropology.net reports on the first major study of ancient African human DNA. New history is revealed.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on how gravitational lensing led to the identification of a single star nine billion light-years away. (This is a record.)
  • Centauri Dreams reports the possible detection of a debris disk around pulsar Geminga, augury of future planets perhaps?
  • Dangerous Minds reports on Seoul’s Haesindang Park, a park literally full of penises–phallic symbols, at least.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes one analysis arguing for the plausibility of unmanned probes using imaginable technology reaching the ten nearest stars in a century.
  • Imageo shares photos from space of the southern California wildfires.
  • Language Hat shares some stirring poetry in Scots.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the scale of child labour in North Carolina’s farm sector.
  • Marginal Revolution thinks that American observers of Putin think, far too much, that he actually has a plan. The degree of chaos in Russia’s affairs is apparently being underestimated.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes the unsettling rural Americana of photographer Gregory Crewdson.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Zhirinovsky’s plan for a sweeping Russian annexation of Ukraine, leaving only the northwest independent.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Language Hat blogs about appearances of Nahuatl in Los Angeles, in television and in education.
  • Language Log talks about “Zhonghua minzu”, meaning “Chinese nation” or “Chinese race” depending on the translation.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Canada, with inelastic production, might have a marijuana shortage come legalization/
  • In the NYR Daily, Christopher de Bellaigue wonders if Britain–the West, even–might be on the verge of a descent into communal violence.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at the accessibility of VIA Rail’s data on trade arrivals and departures.
  • Starts with a Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, in the far distant starless future, the decay of binary brown dwarf orbits can still start stars.
  • Torontoist shares photos of the Dyke March.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Tatarstan’s tradition of bourgeois and intellectually critical nationalism could have wider consequences, in Russia and beyond.