A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘algeria

[BLOG] Five LRB Blog links (#lrbblog)

  • Daniel Trilling at the LRB Blog writes about a visit to the House of European History museum in Brussels.
  • The LRB Blog explores Australia at a time of fire, here.
  • What is going on, the LRB Blog considers, in Algeria?
  • Giving birth in France at a time of mass strikes, the LRB Blog suggests, is certainly an interesting experience.
  • James Butler writes at the LRB Blog about what Labour has to do after its stunning electoral defeat.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 22, 2019 at 5:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the importance of complete rest.
  • Citizen Science Salon looks at the contributions of ordinary people to Alzheimer’s research.
  • The Crux notes how recent planetary scientists acknowledge Venus to be an interestingly active world.
  • D-Brief notes the carnivorous potential of pandas.
  • Cody Delistraty considers a British Library exhibit about writing.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the possibility that, in red giant systems, life released from the interiors of thawed outer-system exomoons might produce detectable signatures in these worlds’ atmospheres.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares reports of some of the latest robot developments from around the world.
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the concepts of gentrification and meritocracy.
  • Gizmodo notes a running dinosaur robot that indicates one route by which some dinosaurs took to flight.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox talks about bringing some principles of Wendell Berry to a town hall discussion in Sterling, Kansas.
  • io9 notes that a reboot of Hellraiser is coming from David S. Goyer.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how museums engage in the deaccessioning of items in their collections.
  • Language Log examines the Mongolian script on the renminbi bills of China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how Volkswagen in the United States is making the situation of labour unions more difficult.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the effective lack of property registration in the casbah of Algiers.
  • The NYR Daily notes the Afrofuturism of artist Devan Shinoyama.
  • Strange Company examines the trial of Jane Butterfield in the 1770s for murdering the man who kept her as a mistress with poison. Did she do it? What happened to her?
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes a controversial map identifying by name the presidents of the hundred companies most closely implicated in climate change.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian Orthodox Church, retaliating against the Ecumenical Patriarchy for its recognition of Ukrainian independence, is moving into Asian territories outside of its purview.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts a rumination by looking at the sportswear of the early 20th century world.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait shares Johannes Kroeger’s image of the median Earth.
  • The Crux considers when human societies began to accumulate large numbers of aged people. Would there have been octogenarians in any Stone Age cultures, for instance?
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers Russia’s strategy in Southeast Asia.
  • Alexandra Samuel at JSTOR Daily notes that one way to fight against fake news is for people to broaden their friends networks beyond their ideological sympathizers.
  • Language Log, noting a television clip from Algeria in which a person defend their native dialect versus standard Arabic, compares the language situation in the Arab world to that of China.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen explains how the Tervuren Central African museum in Brussels has not been decolonized.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explores the ice giants, Uranus and Neptune.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why, in current physics, the multiverse must exist.
  • Strange Company explores the strange disappearance, in the Arizona desert in 1952, of a young couple. Their plane was found and in perfect condition, but what happened to them?
  • Strange Maps reports on the tragic migration of six Californian raptors, only one of which managed to make it to its destination.
  • Towleroad reports on the appearance of actor and singer Ben Platt on The Ellen Show, talking about his career and coming out.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the apparently widespread mutual dislike of Chechens and Muscovites.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the French Impressionist artists Pierre Puvis de Chavannes and Suzanne Valadon, with images of their art.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers the possibility of life not based on DNA as we know it.
  • D-Brief considers the possibility that the formation of stratocumulus clouds might be halted by climate change.
  • Karen Sternheimer writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about the negative health effects of the stresses imposed by racists.
  • Far Outliers notes the mix of migrants in the population of Calcutta.
  • Hornet Stories notes that the Brazilian government is preparing to revoke marriage equality.
  • Erin Blakemore writes at JSTOR Daily about the gloriously messy complexity of Jane Eyre.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the growing anti-government protests in Algeria.
  • The NYR Daily notes the response of Auden to an anthology’s no-platforming of the poems of Ezra Pound.
  • pollotenchegg reports on Soviet census data from 1990, mapping the great disparities between different parts of the Soviet Union.
  • Starts With A Bang notes the mysterious quiet of the black hole at the heart of the Whirlpool Galaxy, M51.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Russia is growing increasingly dependent on a more competent China.
  • Arnold Zwicky writes about some of his encounters, past and present, on Emerson Street in Palo Alto.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at the question of how far, exactly, the Pleiades star cluster is from Earth. It turns out this question breaks down into a lot of interesting secondary issues.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly starts an interesting discussion around the observation that so many people are uncomfortable with the details of their body.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the exciting evidence of cryovolcanism at Ceres.
  • The Crux reports on new suggestions that, although Neanderthals had bigger brains than Homo sapiens, Neanderthal brains were not thereby better brains.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that the ability of bats and dolphins to echolocate may ultimate derive from a shared gene governing their muscles.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that astronomers have used data on the trajectory of ‘Oumuamua to suggest it may have come from one of four stars.
  • Far Outliers explores the Appalachian timber boom of the 1870s that created the economic preconditions for the famed feud between the Hatfields and the McCoys.
  • Language Hat notes the unique whistling language prevailing among the Khasi people living in some isolated villages in the Indian state of Meghalaya.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicles, notes that the fastest-growing language in the United States is the Indian language of Telugu.
  • Jeremy Harding at the LRB Blog writes about the import of the recognition, by Macron, of the French state’s involvement in the murder of pro-Algerian independence activist Maurice Audin in 1958.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution praises the diaries of Mihail Sebastian, a Romanian Jewish intellectual alive during the Second World War
  • The New APPS Blog takes a look at the concept of the carnival from Bakhtin.
  • Gabrielle Bellot at NYR Daily considers the life of Elizabeth Bishop and Bishop’s relationship to loneliness.
  • Jason Davis at the Planetary Society Blog describes how CubeSats were paired with solar sails to create a Mars probe, Mars Cube One.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers some possible responses from the left to a conservative Supreme Court in the US.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look at the challenges facing the street food of Xi’an.
  • Rocky Planet examines why, for decades, geologists mistakenly believed that the California ground was bulging pre-earthquake in Palmdale.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines how some objects called stars, like neutron stars and white dwarfs and brown dwarfs, actually are not stars.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes how China and Europe stand out as being particularly irreligious on a world map of atheism.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the instability that might be created in the North Caucasus by a border change between Chechnya and Ingushetia.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some beautiful pictures of flowers from a garden in Palo Alto.

[NEWS] Six links: Cities and Burning Man, urban China, gentrification, Belarus, Algeria, refugees

  • Wired features an article talking about what Burning Man, and Black Rock City, teaches us about how cities work.
  • At The New Republic, Colin Kinniburgh talks about some strategies to fight gentrification, some potentially useful and others not.
  • Bloomberg View observes that China’s Pearl River Delta–briefly, most of urban Guangzhou from Hong Kong up–is set to have a huge property boom.
  • Bloomberg describes how Algeria, hostile to taking on debt, is going through a period of deep austerity.
  • Open Democracy looks at how the Belarusian language, despite improvements, is shut out of the country’s education system.
  • This Toronto Star article describing the detritus left by refugees fleeing New York just before they get to Canada is very sad.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO shares the new face of the Broadview Hotel.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the joys of the unscreened life.
  • Dead Things reports on a study suggesting that although humans are violent by the standards of mammals, we are among the least violent primates.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on the discovery of five sizable planets orbiting HIP 41378.
  • Language Log reports on the perils of 7 and 9 in Cantonese.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the usefulness of The Battle of Algiers.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reacts to the Elon Musk proposal for colonizing Mars.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer responds briefly to the question of what Mexico can do about Trump.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian invasion of Ukraine has spurred new arms purchases throughout the eastern half of Europe, even in Belarus.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Antipope’s Charlie Stross fears the arrival of fascism in Britain after the murder of Jo Cox.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on SDSSJ1043+0855, a white dwarf apparently consuming a rocky planet.
  • The Crux notes discussion of terraforming Mars.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the revealing result of a study of the crops that ancient Indonesians brought to Madagascar.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers hierarchy has manifested in a dance competition being filmed for television.
  • The LRB Blog considers the state of Algerian and Arab-language literature.
  • The Map Room Blog maps migrant deaths in the Mediterranean.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the collapse of coal companies in the United States.
  • The Power and the Money notes that Puerto Rico is not a colony of the United States.
  • Savage Minds considers at length the situation of Crimea and of Crimean Tatars.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if the West is forgetting about Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO notes that Québec chain Simons will be opening up stories in Toronto and Mississauga in the coming years.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly notes that The Devil Wears Prada actually offers good advice to job-seekers.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a search program for planets at Proxima Centauri and considers Proxima’s linkage to the Alpha Centauri A-B binary.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes distant gas giant HD 106906b.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that acceptance of gays is at an all-time high.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an exhibition of colonial cartography of Algeria and points to an essay on critical cartography.
  • Marginal Revolution notes high levels of female mortality in the US South.
  • Savage Minds considers the question of how to exhibit physical artifacts in an era of 3-D printing.
  • John Scalzi’s Whatever and Charlie Stross’ Antipope mourn the death of science fiction editor David Hartwell.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Russia’s growing difficulties wth Chechen dictator Kadyrov, observes that most Tajiks recruited for ISIS are recruited as workers in Russia, suggests the annexation of Crimea helped bolster Russia’s ethnic Russian and Slavic populations, and notes hostility in Chuvashia towards Russian language policy in education.

[DM] “Some migration-related news links”

I’ve some links up at Demography Matters, reporting on some interesting migration-related news articles.