A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘alpha centauri

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Architectuul visits the studio of Barbas Lopes Arquitectos in Lisbon, here.
  • Bad Astronomer takes a look at a new paper examining the effectiveness of different asteroid detection technologies, including nuclear weapons.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new study suggesting potentially habitable planets orbiting Alpha Centauri B, smaller of the two stars, could suffer from rapid shifts of their axes.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber argues some polls suggest some American conservatives really would prefer Russia as a model to California.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the discovery, by the Murchison Widefield Array in Australia, of 27 supernova remnants in our galaxy.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links about stealth aircraft, here.
  • Gizmodo notes a new study suggesting that DNA is but one of very very many potential genetic molecules.
  • Language Hat shares a reevaluation of the Richard Stanyhurst translation of the Aeneid, with its manufactured words. Why mightn’t this have been not mockable but rather creative?
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money celebrated the 50th anniversary of the takeover of Alcatraz Island by Native American activists.
  • Chris Bertram writes at the LRB Blog, after the catastrophe of the Essex van filled with dozens of dead migrants, about the architecture of exclusion that keeps out migrants.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a comment looking at the fentanyl crisis from a new angle.
  • Jenny Uglow writes at the NYR Daily about a Science Museum exhibit highlighting the dynamic joys of science and its progress over the centuries.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes a look at the question of how to prevent the wildfires currently raging in Australia. What could have been done, what should be done?
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on proposals from China for two long-range probe missions to interstellar space, including a Neptune flyby.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the wonderfully innocent Pinocchio currently playing at the Young People’s Theatre.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the evidence for the universe, maybe, being closed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the Alexandria Patriarchate is the next Orthodox body to recognize the Ukrainian church.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at irregular versus regular, as a queer word too.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer notes a new study explaining how climate change makes hurricanes more destructive.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a mosaic photo of the sky with Alpha Centauri highlighted.
  • The Crux shares a paper explaining why the bubonic plague rarely becomes mass epidemics like the Black Death of the 14th century.
  • D-Brief notes the new ESA satellite ARIEL, which will be capable of determining of exoplanet skies are clear or not.
  • Gizmodo consults different experts on the subject of smart drugs. Do they work?
  • JSTOR Daily explains why Native Americans are so prominent in firefighting in the US Southwest.
  • Language Log looks at evidence for the diffusion of “horse master” between speakers of ancient Indo-European and Sinitic languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the election of Chesa Boudin as San Francisco District Attorney.
  • The LRB Blog considers the apparent pact between Farage and Johnson on Brexit.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at a paper examining longer-run effects of the integration of the US military on racial lines in the Korean War.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how Big Pharma in the US is trying to deal with the opioid epidemic.
  • The Signal explains how the Library of Congress is expanding its collections of digital material.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how future generations of telescopes will be able to directly measure the expansion of the universe.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy explains why DACA, giving succor to Dreamers, is legal.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, after a century of tumult, the economy of Russia is back at the same relative ranking that it enjoyed a century ago.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on an old butch cookbook.

[URBAN NOTE] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait considers the possibility that our model for the evolution of galaxies might be partially disproven by Big Data.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly reports how she did her latest article for the New York Times.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the beginning of a search for habitable-zone planets around Alpha Centauri A and B.
  • The Crux looks at how the skull trophies of the ancient Maya help explain civilizational collapse.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence suggesting that our humble, seemingly stable Sun can produce superflares.
  • Dead Things reports on the latest informed speculation about the sense of smell of Tyrannosaurus Rex.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares the NASA report on its progress towards the Lunar Gateway station.
  • Gizmodo looks at the growing number of China’s beautiful, deadly, blooms of bioluminescent algae.
  • io9 reports that Stjepan Sejic has a new series with DC, exploring the inner life of Harley Quinn.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at an example of a feminist musical, the Chantal Akerman The Eighties.
  • Language Hat links to a review of a dystopian novel by Yoko Tawada, The Emissary, imagining a future Japan where the learning of foreign languages is banned.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money reiterates that history, and the writing of history, is an actual profession with skills and procedures writers in the field need to know.
  • Liam Shaw writes at the LRB Blog about how people in London, late in the Second World War, coped with the terrifying attacks of V2 rockets.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new book, Wayfinding, about the neuroscience of navigation.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution reviews a Robert Zubrin book advocating the colonization of space and finds himself unconvinced.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the ancient comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko explored by the ESA Rosetta probe.
  • Roads and Kingdoms provides tips for visitors to the Paraguay capital of Asuncion.
  • Peter Rukavina reports that, on the day the new PEI legislature came in, 105% of Island electricity came from windpower.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel argues that, in searching for life, we should not look for exoplanets very like Earth.
  • Strange Company shares another weekend collection of diverse links.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little shares the views of Margaret Gilbert on social facts.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Kadyrov might dream of a broad Greater Chechnya, achieved at the expense of neighbouring republics.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers some superhero identity crises, of Superman and of others.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the possible discovery of Proxima Centauri c.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a second circumbinary planet in the Kepler-47 system.
  • Far Outliers notes the Union reaction to the civil war battle of Shiloh.
  • Mark Graham shares a link to an article abstract examining the impact of call centres on social upgrading in South Africa.
  • io9 notes plans for closer integration between the movie and television properties of the MCU.
  • JSTOR Daily explains how Florida got its name.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the similarities between the Notre Dame fire and the destruction of the National Museum of Brazil last year.
  • The LRB Blog notes the appeal of Gothic architecture.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that, in the United States, negative effects of the China Shock had concluded a decade ago.
  • The NYR Daily looks at Trump’s agitprop.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews actor Nathaniel Bacon on the occasion of his appearance in a new Sky Gilbert show.
  • Peter Rukavina shares a map of light pollution on PEI.
  • Starts With A Bang shares a plan for reducing light pollution in a n urbanizing world.
  • Window on Eurasia complains of a creeping annexation of Belarus by Russia.

[NEWS] Five space science links: Psyche, Proxima Centauri b and c, Voyager and Pioneer, humans

  • Evan Gough at Universe Today notes the possibility that the asteroid Psyche, in its hot youth, might have had volcanoes ejecting molten iron.
  • Matt Williams at Universe Today notes a new paper suggesting that, on suitable exoplanets orbiting red dwarfs like Proxima Centauri b, their stars produce environments not much more hostile than those suffered by the early Earth.
  • Nadia Drake at National Geographic notes the news of the possible discovery of a second exoplanet at Proxima Centauri, c, in a five-year orbit.
  • Matt Williams at Universe Today shares a study tracing the paths of the Voyager and Pioneer spacecraft over millennia of movement in interstellar space.
  • Jason Pontin at WIRED shares the result of a study of twin astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly, noting how space affected Scott Kelly in negative ways. Long-distance human spaceflight is possible, but more work is definitely needed for it to be safe, even survivable.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Architectuul takes a look at a new exhibition exploring women architects in Bauhaus.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares a photo of Chang’e-4 taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the power of perspective, demonstrated by photos taken in space far from the Earth.
  • Far Outliers notes the role of the Indian army, during the Raj, in engaging and mobilizing peasants while allowing recruits to maintain village traditions.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a new study from the Netherlands suggesting the children of same-sex parents do better in school than children of opposite-sex parents.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the astonishing plagiarism and sloppy writing of former NYT editor Jill Abramson.
  • Michael Hofman at the LRB Blog takes a look at the mindset producing the Brexit catastrophe.
  • Marginal Revolution takes a look at the decline of the wealth tax in recent decades in high-income countries. Apparently the revenues collected were often not substantial enough.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares missions updates from Chang’e-4 on the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the Cirque √Čloize show Hotel.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one call for Tatarstan, and Tatar nationalists, to abandon a territorial model of identity focused on the republic, seeing as how so many Tatars live outside of Tatarstan.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at the play in language involved in a recent Bizarro comic.

[NEWS] Five space links: China in Argentina, Moon impacts, Alpha Centauri trip, supernova, R Aquarii

  • A Chinese space tracking base in Argentina is proving controversial, among its neighbours and in the wider region. VICE reports.
  • Universe Today notes a new project aimed at monitoring the Moon to catch the flash of asteroid impacts, to better gauge (among other things) the risk to Earth.
  • Universe Today notes one proposal to send an unmanned probe to Alpha Centauri.
  • Universe Today looks at the possibility that a supernova near Earth some 2.6 million years ago might have triggered mass extinctions of ocean life.
  • Universe Today looks at R Aquarii, a close binary of a Mira-type red giant feeding a white dwarf a mere 650 light years away.