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Posts Tagged ‘animal rights

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • At anthro{dendum}, Amarilys Estrella writes about the aftermath of a car accident she experienced while doing fieldwork.
  • Architectuul notes at a tour of Berlin looking at highlights from an innovative year for architecture in West Berlin back in 1987.
  • Bad Astronomer notes that interstellar comet 2/Borisov is behaving surprisingly normally.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes briefly about the difficulty, and the importance, of being authentic.
  • Centauri Dreams shares some of the recent findings of Voyager 2 from the edge of interstellar space.
  • Crooked Timber shares a photo of a courtyard in Montpellier.
  • D-Brief notes a study of the genetics of ancient Rome revealing that the city once was quite cosmopolitan, but that this cosmopolitanism passed, too.
  • Dangerous Minds notes a 1972 single where Marvin Gaye played the Moog.
  • Cody Delistraty looks at Degas and the opera.
  • Bruce Dorminey makes a case, scientific and otherwise, against sending animals into space.
  • Far Outliers looks at a 1801 clash between the American navy and Tripoli pirates.
  • Gizmodo notes a theory that ancient primates learned to walk upright in trees.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the Cayman Islands overturned a court ruling calling for marriage equality.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the experience of women under Reconstruction.
  • Language Hat notes the exceptional multilingualism of the Qing empire.
  • Language Log looks at circumstances where the Roman alphabet is used in contemporary China.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the forced resignation of Evo Morales in Bolivia, and calls for readers to take care with their readings on the crisis and the country.
  • Marginal Revolution considers a new sociological theory suggesting that the medieval Christian church enacted policy which made the nuclear family, not the extended family, the main structure in Europe and its offshoots.
  • Sean Marshall takes a look at GO Transit fare structures, noting how users of the Kitchener line may pay more than their share.
  • Neuroskeptic takes a look at the contradictions between self-reported brain activity and what brain scanners record.
  • Alex Hutchinson writes at the NYR Daily about human beings and their relationship with wilderness.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections considers the impact of drought in Australia’s New England, and about the need for balances.
  • The Planetary Society Blog offers advice for people interested in seeing today’s transit of Mercury across the Sun.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests Argentines may not have cared about their national elections as much as polls suggested.
  • Peter Rukavina shares an image of an ancient Charlottetown traffic light, at Prince and King.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the significant convergence, and remaining differences, between East and West Germany.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at some of the backstory to the Big Bang.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy suggests the Paris Accords were never a good way to deal with climate change.
  • Window on Eurasia shares someone arguing the policies of Putin are simple unoriginal Bonapartism.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Economy makes the case that slow economic recoveries are deep economic recoveries.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how the failure of the media to serve as effective critics of politics has helped lead, in the UK of Brexit, to substantial political change.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the idea, first expressed in comics, of Russian sardines.

[NEWS] Five Canadian culture links: Ontario, French’s, Sealfest, Beauty in a Box, oilpatch & drugs

  • Jamie Bradburn takes a look at the early 1980s genesis of the Ontario slogan “Yours to discover”.
  • CBC examines how French’s ketchup managed to take a lead over Heinz thanks to good marketing use of Canadian patriotism.
  • CBC reports on the east coast culinary festival of Sealfest, making use of seal products.
  • NOW Toronto praises Beauty in a Box, the new Cheryl Thompson book examining the African-Canadian beauty industry in all of its many facets through history.
  • This Toronto Star exposé takes a look at the disturbingly high rates of substance abuse among Alberta oilpatch workers.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Montréal, Detroit, New York City, Mumbai, Stratford

  • La Presse interviews one owner of a calèche, an iconic horse-and-carriage from Montréal, who claims that an impending ban will be devastating.
  • blogTO notes the possibility, in the early 2020s, of a new passenger rail route connecting Toronto to Detroit.
  • CityLab takes a look at The Shed, the performing arts centre in the controversial Manhattan development of Hudson Yards.
  • Bloomberg makes the argument for India to create a purpose-built financial centre for Mumbai.
  • Stu Neatby at The Guardian looks at the shortage of rental housing in the growing Charlottetown PE suburb of Stratford.

[CAT] Five #caturday links: names, declawing, outdoors, Washington D.C., Pet Sematery

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  • D-Brief was the first news source I noted that explained a study demonstrating that, yes, cats did recognize their names.
  • Banning the declawing of cats on account of the inhumanity of that action makes perfect sense to me. CTV News reports.
  • CityLab is perfectly correct to note that, ferociously efficient predators they are, cats should no be let out into the wild.
  • This Washington Post report of a study seeking to track the location of cat populations in the wild in Washington D.C. is fascinating, and important.
  • Cinema Blend tells of the specialization, and sensitivity, of the eight different cats used to play the cat Church in the new movie Pet Sematery.
  • [ISL] Five #islands links: Iles-de-la-Madeleine, St. Kilda, Heligoland, Rapa Nui, Tonga

    • Le Devoir took a look at the importance of the seal hunt for the Iles-de-la-Madeleine.
    • Alex Boyd at The Island Review details, with prose and photos, his visit to the now-deserted island of St. Kilda.
    • The Economist took a look at the German North Sea island of Heligoland.
    • Orlando Milesi writes at the Inter Press Service about the threats posed by climate changes to the iconic statues and marine resources of Rapa Nui.
    • VICE looks at the plight of people who, as convicted criminals, were deported to the Tonga where they held citizenship. How do they live in a homeland they may have no experience of?

    [BLOG] Some Monday links

    • Architectuul celebrates the life and achievements of furniture designer Florence Basset Knoll.
    • Bad Astronomy notes the remarkably detailed 3d simulation of a solar flare.
    • At Crooked Timber, John Holbo engages with Corey Robin’s article in The New Yorker on the question of why people moving politically from right to left are less prominent than counterparts moving from left to right.
    • Far Outliers takes a look at the rise and the fall of the international silk trade of China, from Roman times to the 20th century.
    • At The Frailest Thing, L.M. Sacasas writes about the importance of listening to observers at the “hinges”, at the moments when things are changing.
    • Internet geographer Mark Graham links to a new chapters making the argument that cyberspace is not a novel new territory.
    • Language Log takes a look at a possible change in the representation of vocal fry as demonstrated in Doonesbury.
    • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the background to the possible 2020 presidential bid of ex-Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.
    • Marginal Revolution’s Alex Tabarrok looks at a history of Aleppo that emphasizes the ancient city’s history of catastrophes.
    • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes issue with an online map highlighting factory farmers created by pressure group Aussie Farms. How meaningful is it, for starters?
    • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the timetable of the introduction of syphillis to Poland-Lithuania in the 1490s.
    • Window on Eurasia looks at Russian population prospects, noting the low fertility among the small cohort of women born in the 1990s.
    • Arnold Zwicky starts by sharing beautiful paintings and photos of tulips, and ends with a meditation on Crimean Gothic.

    [BLOG] Some Wednesday links

    • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes that far-orbiting body 2015 TC387 offers more indirect evidence for Planet Nine, as does D-Brief.
    • Centauri Dreams notes that data from the Gaia astrometrics satellite finds traces of past collisions between the Milky Way Galaxy and the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy.
    • The Crux takes a look at the long history of human observation of the Crab Nebula.
    • Sujata Gupta at JSTOR Daily writes about the struggle of modern agriculture with the pig, balancing off concerns for animal welfare with productivity.
    • Language Hat shares a defensive of an apparently legendarily awful novel, Marguerite Young’s Miss Macintosh, My Darling.
    • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle, takes a look at the controversy over the name of the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia, going up to the recent referendum on North Macedonia.
    • The LRB Blog reports on the high rate of fatal car accidents in the unrecognized republic of Abkhazia.
    • Reddit’s mapporn shares an interesting effort to try to determine the boundaries between different regions of Europe, stacking maps from different sources on top of each other.
    • Justin Petrone at North! writes about how the northern wilderness of Estonia sits uncomfortably with his Mediterranean Catholic background.
    • Peter Watts reports from a book fair he recently attended in Lviv, in the west of Ukraine.
    • Jason Davis at the Planetary Society Blog notes the new effort being put in by NASA into the search for extraterrestrial intelligence.
    • Roads and Kingdoms reports on some beer in a very obscure bar in Shanghai.
    • Drew Rowsome reports on the performance artist Lukas Avendano, staging a performance in Toronto inspired by the Zapotech concept of the muxe gender.
    • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps examines the ocean-centric Spielhaus map projection that has recently gone viral.
    • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the question of whether or not the Big Rip could lead to another Big Bang.
    • Window on Eurasia notes the harm that global warming will inflict on the infrastructures of northern Siberia.
    • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell considers the ecological fallacy in connection with electoral politics. Sometimes there really are not niches for new groups.
    • Arnold Zwicky takes part in the #BadStockPhotosOfMyJob meme, this time looking at images of linguists.