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Posts Tagged ‘anthropology

[LINK] “Yukon home to 1st traces of humans in North America 24,000 years ago, research suggests”

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CBC reports decidedly noteworthy findings from the famous Bluefish Caves site in Yukon, suggesting that the Americas–or, at least, the portions of eastern Beringia that were ice-free–were inhabited for ten thousand years longer than previously thought.

Humans may have been living in Yukon’s Bluefish Caves 10,000 years earlier than previously thought, new research from the University of Montreal suggests.

If confirmed, this would make it the oldest known archeological site in North America, representing the earliest evidence found so far of humans in North America.

New carbon aging tests were done on bones first discovered in the caves south of Old Crow, Yukon, in the 1970s.

The Bluefish Caves in Yukon lie in a region known as Beringia that stretched from the Mackenzie River in N.W.T. to Siberia nearly 24,000 years ago during the last ice age. Parts of it are now underwater.

The testing suggests that’s when the human beings lived near the caves.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 18, 2017 at 9:15 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly calls on journalists to stand up to Trump.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at exocomets.
  • Language Log shares an ad from the 1920s using the most vintage language imaginable.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money talks about globalization as a mechanism for concentrating wealth at the top of the elite.
  • The LRB Blog talks about the ghosts of the Cold War in the contemporary world.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen argues that Germany has its own responsibility in transatlantic relations.
  • The New APPS Blog looks at the importance of administrative law.
  • The NYRB Daily celebrates John Berger.
  • Savage Minds proposes a read-in of Michel Foucault in protest of Trump’s inauguration on the 20th.
  • Towleroad reports on the latest statistics on the proportions of LGBT people in the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the continuing depopulation of the Russian Far East and examines the shift to indigenous naming practices in Kyrgyzstan.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling notes the terminal problems of Livejournal.
  • blogTO names five up-and-coming Toronto neighbourhoods.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at asteroids and other bodies in space that might be natural vehicles for travelling between planets.
  • Crooked Timber links to a grim analysis of the prospects for the United Kingdom’s Labour Party.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting a search for Beta Pictoris b as it transits its star.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the importance of Chuck Norris in Ceaucescu’s Romania.
  • Savage Minds looks at reasons why anthropologists have failed to join in a boycott of Israeli academic institutions.
  • Torontoist notes the generally low quality of jobs created recently in Toronto.
  • Window on Eurasia links to two scenarios for Russia’s collapse, looks at conflicts in Russia-Belarus relations, and considers two Estonian novels recently published regarding Russian invasions.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Anthropology.net describes an effort to digitize tapes recording Navajo oral history.
  • Centauri Dreams remembers Vera Rubin.
  • D-Brief looks</a at a South Korean mecha.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a 1984 TV clip featuring George Michael and Morrissey talking about Joy Division.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting a gas giant exoplanet might be indicated by a protoplanetary disk.
  • Language Log reports on how Chinese netizens are criticizing pollution through the mockery of official slogans.
  • Language Hat looks at the question of how the word “pecan” is pronounced.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues political science is not a science at all, like economics.
  • The NYRB Daily notes that the shared inability of Trump and Putin to plan things and account for unexpected consequences does not lend itself to optimism.
  • Window on Euruasia looks at Tatarstan’s issues with regional transfer funding in Russia and shares an apocalyptic account of what will happen to Ukraine in the Russian sphere of influence.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the advanced microelectronics that might last a space probe the two decades it would take to get to Proxima Centauri.
  • Dangerous Minds links to a 1980 filmed concert performance by Queen.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on the discovery of potassium in the atmosphere of WASP-17b.
  • Language Hat looks at the Carmina of Optatianus, an interesting piece of Latin literature.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the shameless anti-democratic maneuvering of the Republicans in North Carolina.
  • The LRB Blog reflects on the shamelessness of the perpetrators of the Aleppo massacres.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at what Charles Darwin’s reading habits have to say about the man’s process of research.
  • North!’s Justin Petrone looks at the elves of Estonia.
  • The NYRB Daily praises the new movie Manchester by the Sea.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares a recent photo of Phobos.
  • Peter Rukavina argues that the Island’s low PISA scores do not necessarily reflect on what Islanders have learned.
  • Savage Minds shares an essay by someone who combines academic work with library work.
  • Torontoist notes the city’s subsidies to some major water polluters.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the anniversary of some important riots in Kazakhstan.
  • Arnold Zwicky reflects on the penguin-related caption of a photo on Wikipedia that has made the world laugh.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith writes about what he has learned from his huskie.
  • Bad Astronomy shares some gorgeous Cassini images of Saturn’s polar hexagon.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at L2 Puppis, a red giant star that our own sun will come to resemble.
  • D-Brief notes climate change is starting to hit eastern Antarctica, the more stable region of the continent.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some of the cool pins put out by supporters of LGBT rights over the decades.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at Susan Faludi’s account of her life with her newly trans father.
  • Far Outliers examines the War of American Independence as one of the many Anglo-French global wars.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders why the Los Angeles Times allowed the publication of letters defend the deportation of the Japanese-Americans.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Alex Tabarrok argues that we are now moving beyond meat production.
  • The NYRB Daily looks at Mexico as a seedbed of modernism.
  • Savage Minds shares an article arguing for a decentering of the position of human beings at the interface of anthropology and science.
  • Understanding Society has more on the strange and fundamentally alien nature of the cephalopod mind.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the North Caucasus is set to go through austerity.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO recommends five neighbourhoods for people looking for apartments.
  • False Steps’ Paul Drye describes a failed European-Russian project for a manned capsule.
  • Language Log looks at the oddity of English pronunciations of words in foreign languages, like placenames, with no connection to how these words are pronounced in English.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is critical of the coverage given to Trump and Clinton, finding it biased against the latter.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that seasteading has a future.
  • The NYRB Daily suggests Israeli colonization will mean the end of the traditional lifestyle of Palestinian Bedouin.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reports on the spread of the red fire ant in Australia.
  • Peter Rukavina describes the unusual round boundaries of the Island village of Crapaud.
  • Savage Minds shares a lovely timeline of the history of anthropology.
  • Torontoist looks at the origins of human rights law in Ontario.
  • Window on Eurasia argues Russia’s position as the Soviet successor state hampers its ability to engage with Communism, and reports on Belarus’ concern at the dominance of local television by Russian imports.