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Posts Tagged ‘anthropology

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Anthrodendum’s Alex Golub talks about anthropologists of the 20th century who resisted fascism.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a study suggesting the TRAPPIST-1 system might be substantially older than our own solar system.
  • Centauri Dreams considers tidal locking as a factor relevant to Earth-like planetary environments.
  • The Crux shows efforts to help the piping plover in its home on the dunes of the Great Lakes coast of Pennsylvania.
  • Dead Things considers the evidence for the presence of modern humans in Sumatra 73 thousand years ago.
  • Bruce Dorminey makes the case for placing a lunar base not on the poles, but rather in the material-rich nearside highlands.
  • Far Outliers shares some evocative placenames from Japan, like Togakushi (‘door-hiding’) from ninja training spaces.
  • Language Hat notes the exceptionally stylistically uneven Spanish translation of the Harry Potter series.
  • Language Log thinks, among other things, modern technologies make language learning easier than ever before.
  • The LRB Blog notes how claims to trace modern Greece directly to the Mycenaean era are used to justify ultranationalism.
  • Marginal Revolution considers which countries are surrounded by enemies. (India rates poorly by this metric.)
  • The Numerati’s Stephen Baker considers how Confederate statues are products of recycling, like so much in our lives.
  • The NYR Daily considers the unique importance of Thomas Jefferson, a man at once statesman and slaver.
  • The Planetary Society Blog celebrated the 40th anniversary of the launch of Voyager 2 Sunday.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that, for a country fighting a drug war, Mexico spends astonishingly little on its police force.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at classic John Wayne Western, The Train Robbers.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the critical role of NASA’s Planetary Protection Officer.
  • Strange Company notes the many legends surrounding the early 19th century US’ Theodosia Burr.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy hosts Ilya Somin’ argument against world government, as something limiting of freedom. Thoughts?
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Ukrainians are turning from Russia, becoming more foreign to their one-time partner.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams reports on the apparent rarity of exomoons of close-orbiting planets.
  • The collapse of the nuclear renaissance is touched on at Crooked Timber. Is it all down to renewables now?
  • Language Hat shares</a. a lovely passage taking a look at writing and memory from an ethnography of central Africa.
  • The outlawing of the Uygur language from the schools of Xinjiang was mentioned at Language Log. This is terrible.</li?
  • The anti-Semitism barely veiled in a Texas campaign against the Democratic Party, noted by Lawyers, Guns and Money, frightens me.
  • The LRB Blog notes that Sylvia Plath stayed in the United Kingdom, far from home, substantially because of the NHS.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the extent to which the economy and the wealth of the South depends on slavery.
  • Had Mexican-American relations gone only trivially differently, Noel Maurer suggests, Mexico could either have been much larger or substantially smaller.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthrodendum considers the question of what, exactly, is the genre of ethnographic film.
  • Centauri Dreams features authors’ calls for a debate on METI, on sending messages to extraterrestrial intelligences.
  • The Crux reports on the continuing damage caused by the continuing eruptions of Indonesia’s mud volcano, Sidoarjo.
  • Imageo shares a cute time-lapse video from Hubble showing the motion of Phobos around Mars.
  • Language Hat responds to a newly-translated mid-19th century Russian novella, Nadezhda Khvoshchinskaya‘s 1861 novella Пансионерка (The Boarding School Girl).
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money has a depressing extended examination of Trump as reflecting structural crisis in the United States.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the genesis and continuing success of Nicaraguan Sign Language.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a satirical map of Washington D.C., defined by the names that its metro stations should have.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang lists the various worlds in our Solar System possibly hosting life, and notes how you could get an Earth-like world with wildly erratic seasons as in Game of Thrones.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that the German president has signed marriage equality into law. (Also, the country has good LGBT protections.)
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Putin is fine with an asymmetrical bilingualism in Russia’s republics, aimed against non-Russian languages.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthrodendum takes a look at how surfing has been commodified.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the stellar occultation that has revealed information about MU69, the next New Horizons target.
  • Crooked Timber’s Corey Robin takes issue with Mélenchon’s take on anti-Semitism and the French role in the Holocaust.
  • D-Brief notes that we really are not good at detecting faked photos.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage photos of strippers from the 1960s.
  • Michael Sacasas of The Frailest Things looks, again, at the technologically enchanted world.
  • Language Log takes issue with the dismissive treatment of “… in a woodpile.” The expression is poison.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the dual position of the camel among the Sahrawi, as wild and tame at once.
  • Neuroskeptic looks at the problems of neuroscience, statistically.
  • The NYR Daily considers the hacking of the American vote. Who did it? Who gained?
  • Science Sushi notes that climate change threats African wild dogs’ survival.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an Armenian argument that Russia lacks the soft power that the Soviet Union once enjoyed.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The anthropology group blog Savage Minds now has a new name, Anthrodendum.
  • Anthropology.net reports on the first major study of ancient African human DNA. New history is revealed.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on how gravitational lensing led to the identification of a single star nine billion light-years away. (This is a record.)
  • Centauri Dreams reports the possible detection of a debris disk around pulsar Geminga, augury of future planets perhaps?
  • Dangerous Minds reports on Seoul’s Haesindang Park, a park literally full of penises–phallic symbols, at least.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes one analysis arguing for the plausibility of unmanned probes using imaginable technology reaching the ten nearest stars in a century.
  • Imageo shares photos from space of the southern California wildfires.
  • Language Hat shares some stirring poetry in Scots.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the scale of child labour in North Carolina’s farm sector.
  • Marginal Revolution thinks that American observers of Putin think, far too much, that he actually has a plan. The degree of chaos in Russia’s affairs is apparently being underestimated.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes the unsettling rural Americana of photographer Gregory Crewdson.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Zhirinovsky’s plan for a sweeping Russian annexation of Ukraine, leaving only the northwest independent.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Anthropology.net notes on how a fossil tooth led eventually to the identification of the fourth Denisovan individual known.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about reasons for people to travel solo.
  • The Dragon’s Tales’ Will Baird notes that the INF Treaty is on the verge of collapse.
  • Mathew Ingram uses a recent GIF of Trump with the Polish president’s wife to show how these lie and mislead.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a sharp collapse in London’s LGBT venues–more than half in the past decade!
  • Marginal Revolution reports on British actors who take up tutoring as a second job to support their careers.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the latest concerns of South Koreans regarding their northern neighbour.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes issue with proposed Australian government surveillance of the local Internet.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell dissects the origins of the false claim that Copernicus was a Catholic priest.
  • Unicorn Booty has a fantastic interview with a scholar, Jamie Bernthal, who makes a case for queer content in Agatha Christie.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that methane bubble explosions in Siberia could wreck Russian pipelines.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • io9 notes that Livejournal’s mascot Frank the Goat has made one last appearance, thanks to his creator.
  • James Bow announces that, after a month of writing and family, he’s back to his blog.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the far-right AfD in Germany is trying to stop marriage equality.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money rightly does not understand what people mean by talking of a Trump administration “failing”. It can still wreak terrible damage.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a lovely map of the Arctic circumpolar region of the Earth.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that tourism has become the dominant growth sector of the Greek economy.
  • Savage Minds shares Taylor R. Genovese essay invoking and exploring the magic and ritual of human spaceflight. (More to come.)
  • Understanding Society considers and approves of the idea of a guaranteed minimum income, necessary supplement in a time of scarce good jobs.
  • Unicorn Booty notes the many ways in which Trumpcare will leave queer LGBTQ people worse off.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy’s Dale Carpenter again engages, after Texas’ ruling, with the idea of equality for all married couples.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that only a small fraction of Russia’s planned spending on the Arctic has actually materialized.