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Posts Tagged ‘anthropology

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Anthropology.net notes that the analysis of a Neanderthal skeleton from Croatia reveals much common ancestry.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares some stunning photos of Jupiter taken by the Juno probe.
  • Crooked Timber considers the differences–such as they are–between science fiction and fantasy literature.
  • After a conversation with Adam Gopnik, Cody Delistraty makes a case for the importance of high-brow culture.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a paper arguing that Earth-like planets can exist even without active plate tectonics.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that operating systems relying on instinct hurt human thought.
  • Language Log considers Twitter post limits for East Asian languages.
  • The LRB Blog considers trench fever and the future of nursing in the United Kingdom.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a study suggesting people actively look out for bad and threatening news items.
  • The NYR Daily examines the reasons why Uber ended up getting banned by the city of London.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on an exciting new staging at the Paramount Theatre of Salt-Water Moon.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the very low proportion of planets in studied exosystems actually detected by Kepler.
  • Strange Company tells the story of John Banvard, a 19th century American who lost everything in mounting panorama exhibitions.
  • Towleroad reports on how PREP contributed to an 80% fall in new HIV diagnoses in London and wider England.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the worsening of HIV/AIDS in Russia, aided by terrible government policy and bad statistics.
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[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Anthrodendum takes a look at the way community knowledge is now being subject to a privatization.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlyn Kelly starts a discussion about what makes home.
  • Bruce Dorminey suggests a pre-Theia, Moon-sized impactor gave the Earth its metal crust.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at the current state of knowledge about Proxima b.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Russia is apparently testing advanced nuclear weapons.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers the religious impulse in so many technophiles’ view of the world.
  • Language Hat considers the dynamics associated with learning minority languages in Europe.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares a classic traffic safety clip from 1913.
  • The LRB Blog mourns the loss of Glen Newey, long-time contributor.
  • Lovesick Cyborg notes a NASA study into the economics of a viable space-based solar power project.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look at the açorda of Portugal, a bread-based broth that was a long-time food of the poor.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands celebrates the passage of summer into fall through photos of her vegetable garden.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the representation of LGBTQ people on television, and sees much reason for cheer.
  • Science Sushi notes that different dolphin groups seem to have different dialects.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at Robert Merton’s refinement of social functionalism.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that many ethnic Russians in Belarus, as in Ukraine, have shifted identity to that of the titular nation.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes one mistake made about artificial intelligence: it is not automatically more accurate.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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io9 looks at the surprising things we are continuing to learn from Tycho’s supernova, SN 1572. https://gizmodo.com/a-famous-supernovas-mysteries-are-still-unraveling-hund-1818816208

Anthrodendum has a thoughtful interview between two anthropologists about their experiences as ethnographers. https://savageminds.org/2017/09/25/explaining-ethnography-in-the-field-a-conversation-between-pasang-yangjee-sherpa-and-carole-mcgranahan/

Centauri Dreams reports on the LIGO/VIRGO detection of gravitational wave #GW170814 https://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=38557
D-Brief also notes the detection of #GW170814 http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2017/09/27/gravitational-wave-virgo/
as does Starts With A Bang https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2017/09/27/ligo-virgo-detects-the-first-three-detector-gravitational-wave/

The Crux notes how ancient rocks on the Québec-Labrador frontier have preserved traces of very early life. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/crux/2017/09/27/earth-oldest-rocks-life/

D-Brief notes the potential discovery of a biomarker for CTE, something that may well help professional athletes. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2017/09/27/cte-biomarker/

Dangerous Minds looks at the time the Pet Shop Boys and Liza Minelli collaborated on an album. http://dangerousminds.net/comments/results_when_the_pet_shop_boys_met_liza_minnelli

The Dragon’s Gaze looks at evidence that a sub-Saturn gas giant is forming around T Tauri star TW Hydrae. http://thedragonsgaze.blogspot.ca/2017/09/tw-hydrae-is-forming-subsaturn-gas-giant.html

Hornet Stories looks at the four lessons a professor took from gay porn, about sexuality and its representation. https://hornetapp.com/stories/gay-porn-professor/

Language Log looks at how Joseon Korea once used the wrong Chinese dialect to talk officially to China. http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=34693

Lawyers, Guns and Money notes an odd defense of Hugh Hefner by a conservative. http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2017/09/hugh-hefner-good-now

The LRB Blog notes the oddly convention nature of Hugh Hefner. https://www.lrb.co.uk/blog/2017/09/28/august-kleinzahler/the-conventional-mr-hefner/

The Map Room Blog argues that faults found with fantasy maps actually reflect deeper issues with fantasy literature. http://www.maproomblog.com/2017/09/the-territory-is-not-the-map/

Marginal Revolution notes that IBM employs more people In India than in the United States.
http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2017/09/india-fact-day-3.html

The NYR Daily notes a new art exhibition of work by Peter Saul dealing with Trump. http://www.nybooks.com/daily/2017/09/27/a-carnival-of-desecration-peter-saul-trump/

The Planetary Society Blog notes the Earth pictures taken by the OSIRIS-REx probe. http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2017/0928-earth-flyby-osiris-rex.html

The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes a worrying new analysis justifying an American strike on North Korea, despite Seoul. http://noelmaurer.typepad.com/aab/2017/09/the-hawks-make-their-case-to-fight-north-korea.html

Drew Rowsome notes an amusing-sounding mystery, Undercover, playing at the Tarragon. http://drewrowsome.blogspot.ca/2017/09/undercover-case-of-comic-mystery.html

Towleroad links to fascinating ethnographic work of LGBT members of American street gangs. How do they do it? http://www.towleroad.com/2017/09/gay-gang/

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Anthrodendum offers resources for understanding race in the US post-Charlottesville.
  • D-Brief notes that exoplanet WASP-12b is a hot Jupiter that is both super-hot and pitch-black.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining various models of ice-covered worlds and their oceans’ habitability.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the value placed by society on different methods of transport.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Chinese migrants were recruited in the 19th century.
  • Hornet Stories notes that the authorship of famously bad fanfic, “My Immortal”, has been claimed, by one Rose Christo.
  • Marginal Revolution notes one explanation for why men are not earning more. (Bad beginnings matter.)
  • Peter Watts has it with facile (and statistically ill-grounded) rhetoric about punching Nazis.
  • At the NYR Daily, Masha Gessen is worried by signs of degeneration in the American body politic.
  • Livejournal’s pollotenchegg maps the strength of Ukrainian political divisions in 2006 and 2010.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer is afraid what AI-enabled propaganda might do to American democracy in the foreseeable future.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes an enjoyable bagel breakfast at Pondichéry’s Auroville Café.
  • Drew Rowsome celebrates the introduction of ultra-low-cost carriers for flyers in Canada.
  • Strange Company notes the 19th century haunting of an English mill.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Crimean Tatars, and Muslims in Crimea, are facing more repression.

[NEWS] Four links about problematic history: swastika, Cornwallis River, castle restoration, humans

  • MacLean’s argues that, in Canada and arguably the West generally, it is much too soon to rehabilitate the swastika.
  • Global News reports on a proposal to rename Nova Scotia’s Cornwallis River.
  • This effort to engage in a minimalist, non-misleading restoration of a Spanish castle is controversial.
  • The argument that human history goes back millions of years, and encompass a huger area than thought, is compelling.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthrodendum considers the difficulties of the anthropologist in the context of a world where their knowledges are monetized.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about two days she spent in Montréal, with photos.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion about the justice, or lack thereof, in Harvard denying convicted murderer Michelle Jones entry into their doctoral program now that her sentence is over.
  • D-Brief looks at the changing nature of the global disease burden, and its economic consequences.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that Equifax’s terribly lax data protection should mark the endgame for them.
  • The Map Room Blog considers the use of earth-observer satellites to predict future disease outbreaks (malaria, here, in Peru).
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how quantum mechanics helps explain nuclear fusion in our sun.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a report that Muscovites live on average 12 years longer than non-Muscovite Russians.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthrodendum considers what, exactly, anthropology majors can do job-wise with their degrees. Interesting ideas.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possible origins of cometary organics in deep space.
  • Hornet Stories talks of anti-immigrant Americans with immigrant ancestors who skirted relevant laws themselves, like Donald Trump.
  • Language Hat considers byssus, an exotic ancient textile and a word with a complex history.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at how the potential for disaster in Florida is worsened by poor planning.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the sad intersection of war, xenophobia, and rising rates of polio in Pakistan (and elsewhere).
  • The Map Room Blog notes an interactive map-related play still showing at the Halifax Fringe, Cartography.
  • The NYR Daily notes a high-profile corruption trial of a former government minister in Moscow.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares Paul Schenk’s story about how he interned at JPL in 1979 for the Voyager 2 flyby.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the search by a Brazilian man for caves in the south of that country.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy asks some interesting questions about the mechanics of Settlers of Catan.
  • At Whatever, John Scalzi remembers Jerry Pournelle.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia is strongly opposed to any Circassian return to their ancestral homeland.