A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘anti-semitism

[NEWS] Seven Christmas links: Bowie and Bing, horror, ghosts, holidays, xenophobia, Elf on the Shelf

  • Dangerous Minds shares the story of the remarkable duet between Bing Crosby and David Bowie.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the 1980 horror film To All A Goodnight.
  • Strange Company shares a strange story, of a ghostly choir reportedly heard in 1944, here.
  • Caitlin Kelly at the Broadside Blog writes about why she and her husband each take Christmas seriously.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the xenophobia behind the idea of a War on Christmas, going back to the anti-Semitism of Henry Ford.
  • JSTOR Daily carries suggestions that the idea of the Grinch, from Dr. Seuss, has anti-Semitic origins.
  • VICE makes the case for the creepiness of the Elf on the Shelf in the context of a surveillance society, here.

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links: Downsview Park, Christie Pits, Queen Video, public art, Joanna Luo

  • A formal inquest into the stage collapse that killed one person at a Radiohead concert at Downsview Park in 2012 is only now taking off. CBC reports.
  • The May opening of a new exhibit of Robert Mapplethorpe’s work at the Olga Korper Gallery, reported by NOW Toronto, is very exciting.
  • blogTO notes a new graphic novel to be put out by Dirty Water Comics dealing with the anti-Semitic Christie Pits Riot of 1933.
  • Queen Video’s last location, in the Annex, is finally closing, with plenty of its titles now available to be bought before it shutters its doors at the end of April. Global News reports.
  • NOW Toronto reports on Museum II, a show part of the Myseum Intersections Festival looking at the impact of war and trauma on spaces.
  • Karon Liu, writing at the Toronto Star, explores with WeChat influencer Joanna Luo a whole universe of Chinese restaurants and social networking that was almost unknown to many Torontonians like myself.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy shares a photo taken by the H-ATLAS satellite of deep space, a sea of pale dusty dots each one a galaxy.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares, in photos and in prose, 11 views of New York City. (What a fantastic metropolis!)
  • Centauri Dreams hosts an essay from Alex Tolley suggesting that most life in the universe is lithophilic, living in the stable warm interiors of planets.
  • Cody Delistraty links to an essay of his looking at the tensions, creative and personal, between Renoir father and son.
  • Gizmodo links to a paper suggesting the mysterious ASASSN-14li event can be explained by a star falling into a supermassive galactic black hole, the analysis suggesting the black hole was rotating at half the speed of light.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the mysterious dancing plagues of medieval Europe.
  • The LRB Blog looks at casual anti-Semitism in British sports.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that the legacies of Confucian state-building in China may have depressed long-term economic growth in particularly Confucian areas.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the success of the Chang’e-4 probe, complete with photos and videos sent from the far side of the Moon.
  • Roads to Kingdoms shares the photography of a changing Vietnam by Simone Sapienza.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the ongoing Toronto comedy show Unsafe Space, and enjoys it.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the achievements of the TESS planet-hunting satellites, looking for nearby planets, emphasizing its achievements in the Pi Mensae system.
  • Window on Eurasia considers a fascinating alternate history. Could Beria, had he survived Stalin, have overseen a radical liberalization of the Soviet Union in the early Cold War?

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • The Buzz celebrates Esi Edugyan’s winning of the Giller Prize for the second time, for her amazing novel Washington Black.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the unusual rings of outer-system body Chariklo.
  • The Crux looks at the long history of unsuccessful planet-hunting at Barnard’s Star, concentrating on the disproved mid-20th century work of Peter Van De Kamp.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that Mars knew catastrophic floods that radically reshaped its surface.
  • Bruce Dorminey visits and explores Korea’s ancient Cheomseongdae Observatory.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog notes the death of long-time contributor Peter Kaufman.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing considers the things–quiet, even–that modernity can undermine before transforming into a commodity.
  • Imageo notes that global warming has continued this American Thanksgiving.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the sour grapes of the Family Research Council at the success of the moving film about “gay conversion therapy”, Boy Erased.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper considering if the zeitgeist of the world is into major monuments.
  • Language Log considers a news report of “arsehole” geese in Australia. As a Canadian, all I can say is that geese are birds that know they are dinosaurs.
  • The LRB Blog reports from the scene of the recent unrecognized elections in the city of Donetsk, run by a pro-Russian regime.
  • The Map Room Blog reports on how Atlas Obscura is exhibiting some amazing maps produced in Dungeons and Dragons campaigns.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper noting how black teachers can help boost achievements among black students.
  • The New APPS Blog looks at how the political economy of our time combines with social media to atomize and fragment society.
  • Nicholas Lezard at the NYR Daily talks about his experience of anti-Semitism, as a non-Jew, in the United Kingdom.
  • Casey Dreier at the Planetary Society Blog suggests families would do better to talk about space at Thanksgiving than about politics, and shares a list of subjects.
  • Drew Rowsome talks about the frustrations and the entertainment involved with Bohemian Rhapsody.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that fifty thousand ethnic Kyrgyz are being held in the Xinjiang camps of China.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some Thanksgiving holiday cartoons by Roz Chast.

[PHOTO] Four photos from the Dufferin Grove vigil

Yesterday evening at 7, I went to the Toronto Community Vigil for the victims of the recent Pittsburgh mass shooting at Dufferin Grove Park, organized by If Not Now Toronto. It was a necessary act of solidarity, gathered under the powerful yellow glow of the streetlights of Havelock Street on the eastern edge of the park and the dimmer glow of house lights in the neighbourhood beyond, a gathering-together of mourning for the dead–in Pittsburgh, in Kentucky, in Gaza–and a statement of the need to join together to resist the alt-right and white nationalism. I’m still afraid of the way the world is evolving, but I don’t think I feel quite so alone.

Vigil (1) #toronto #dufferingrovepark #ifnotnow #pittsburghstrong #vigil #night #latergram

Vigil (2) #toronto #dufferingrovepark #ifnotnow #pittsburghstrong #vigil #night #latergram

Vigil (3) #toronto #dufferingrovepark #ifnotnow #pittsburghstrong #vigil #night #latergram

Vigil (4) #toronto #dufferingrovepark #ifnotnow #pittsburghstrong #vigil #night #latergram

Written by Randy McDonald

October 31, 2018 at 11:00 am

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • David Price at {anthro}dendum considers, going through archival material from the 1950s, the number of radical anthropologists in the US as yet little known or unknown who were marginalized by the Red Scare.
  • Centauri Dreams ruminates on a paper examining ‘Oumuamua that considers radiation pressure as a factor in its speed. Might it work as–indeed, be?–a lightsail?
  • D-Brief notes the various reasons why the Chinese proposal for an artificial moon of sorts, to illuminate cities at night, would not work very well at all.
  • The Dragon’s Tales touches on the perhaps hypocritical anger of Russia at the United States’ departure from the INF treaty.
  • Far Outliers notes the sharp divides among Nazi prisoners of war in a camp in Texas, notably between pro- and anti-Nazi prisoners.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing revisits the original sin of the Internet culture, its imagining of a split between an individual’s virtual life and the remainder of their life.
  • The Island Review welcomes, and interviews, its new editor C.C. O’Hanlon.
  • JSTOR Daily explores the reasons for considering climate change to be a national security issue.
  • Language Hat is enthused by the recent publication of a new dictionary of the extinct Anatolian languages of the Indo-European family.
  • Language Log examines the existence of a distinctive, even mocked, southern French accent spoken in and around (among other cities) Toulouse.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the rise of fascism in Brazil with Bolsonaro.
  • Roger Shuy at Lingua Franca writes about the power of correspondence, of written letters, to help language learners. (I concur.)
  • At the LRB Blog, Jeremy Bernstein writes about anti-Semitism in the United States, in the 1930s and now.
  • The NYR Daily examines the life of writer, and long-time exile from her native Portugal, Maria Gabriela Llansol.
  • Haley Gray at Roads and Kingdoms reports on the life and work of Mark Maryboy, a Navajo land rights activist in Utah.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the Russian urban myth of blonde Baltic snipers from the Baltic States who had been enlisted into wars against Russia like that of Chechnya in the 1990s.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at the classic red phone booths of the United Kingdom, now almost all removed from the streets of the country and sent to a graveyard in a part of rural Yorkshire that has other claims to fame.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthrodendum takes a look at how surfing has been commodified.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the stellar occultation that has revealed information about MU69, the next New Horizons target.
  • Crooked Timber’s Corey Robin takes issue with Mélenchon’s take on anti-Semitism and the French role in the Holocaust.
  • D-Brief notes that we really are not good at detecting faked photos.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage photos of strippers from the 1960s.
  • Michael Sacasas of The Frailest Things looks, again, at the technologically enchanted world.
  • Language Log takes issue with the dismissive treatment of “… in a woodpile.” The expression is poison.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the dual position of the camel among the Sahrawi, as wild and tame at once.
  • Neuroskeptic looks at the problems of neuroscience, statistically.
  • The NYR Daily considers the hacking of the American vote. Who did it? Who gained?
  • Science Sushi notes that climate change threats African wild dogs’ survival.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an Armenian argument that Russia lacks the soft power that the Soviet Union once enjoyed.