A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘architecture

[PHOTO] 314 Jarvis Street, destroyed

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314 Jarvis Street, destroyed #toronto #jarvisstreet #carltonstreet #gardendistrict #314jarvis #destroyed #fire

Written by Randy McDonald

September 16, 2019 at 11:15 am

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Milton, Hamilton, New York City, Mexico City, Tel Aviv

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  • MacLean’s reports from the GTA suburban city of Milton, a key battleground in the federal election.
  • Hamilton police continues to be caught up in controversy over its handling of Pride. Global News reports.
  • CityLab profiles new murals being created in New York City’s Harlem, on 125th street, here.
  • Guardian Cities considers some ambitious plans for remodeling Mexico City, with vast new neighbourhoods and airports, which never came off.
  • Atlas Obscura looks at a notable library of books and other documents in the Yiddish language, housed out of a decrepit bus terminal in Tel Aviv.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Architectuul shares photos from a bike tour of Berlin.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on new evidence that exocomets are raining on star Beta Pictoris.
  • Larry Klaes at Centauri Dreams reviews the two late 1970s SF films Alien and Star Trek I, products of the same era.
  • D-Brief reports on Hubble studies of the star clusters of the Large Magellanic Cloud.
  • Bruce Dorminey shares Gemini telescope images of interstellar comet C/2019 Q4 (Borisov).
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares video of Space X’s Starhopper test flight.
  • Far Outliers notes the import of the 13th century Norman king of England calling himself Edward after an Anglo-Saxon king.
  • Gizmodo notes that not only can rats learn to play hide and seek, they seem to enjoy it.
  • io9 notes the fantastic high camp of Mister Sinister in the new Jonathan Hickman X-Men run, borrowing a note from Kieron Gillen’s portrayal of the character.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Guiliani’s soon-to-be ex-wife says he has descended from 911 hero to a liar.
  • Language Log looks at the recent ridiculous suggestion that English, among other languages, descends from Chinese.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the brief history of commemorating the V2 attacks on London.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the practice in Saskatchewan of sterilizing First Nations women against their consent.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that farmers in Brazil might be getting a partly unfair treatment. (Partly.)
  • The Planetary Society Blog explains why C/2019 Q4 (Borisov) matters.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, for the first time, immigrants from Turkmenistan in Belarus outnumber immigrants from Ukraine.

[PHOTO] Old vitrolite tiles of College Station, 2019

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Four years after I first saw the old green vitrolite tiles of College Station, I saw them again last night.

Old vitrolite tiles of College Station, 2019 #toronto #ttc #subway #collegestation #green #vitrolite #tiles

Written by Randy McDonald

September 13, 2019 at 10:00 am

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Valley Land Trail, e-scooters, rental housing, Brooke Lynn Hytes

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  • The new Valley Land Trail in Scarborough looks amazing. blogTO explains.
  • John Lorinc writes at Spacing about the challenges posed by the legalization of e-scooters in Toronto.
  • Why are there not more apartment buildings being built in Toronto, given the pressing demand for rental housing? The Toronto Star reports.
  • David Sajecki at Spacing writes about how the construction of a low-rise apartment building at 1103 Dufferin Street, one that blends seamlessly into Wallace Emerson, points the way forward for the city.
  • At Toronto Life, Emily Landau profiles Toronto-born drag queen Brooke Lynn Hytes.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Ryan Anderson at anthro{dendum} looks at the unnatural history of the beach in California, here.
  • Architectuul looks at the architectural imaginings of Iraqi Shero Bahradar, here.
  • Bad Astronomy looks at gas-rich galaxy NGC 3242.
  • James Bow announces his new novel The Night Girl, an urban fantasy set in an alternate Toronto with an author panel discussion scheduled for the Lillian H. Smith Library on the 28th.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the indirect evidence for an exomoon orbiting WASP-49b, a possible Io analogue detected through its ejected sodium.
  • Crooked Timber considers the plight of holders of foreign passports in the UK after Brexit.
  • The Crux notes that astronomers are still debating the nature of galaxy GC1052-DF2, oddly lacking in dark matter.
  • D-Brief notes how, in different scientific fields, the deaths of prominent scientists can help progress.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how NASA and the ESA are considering sample-return missions to Ceres.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina looks at the first test flights of the NASA Mercury program.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at how Japan is considering building ASAT weapons.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina looks at the first test flights of the NASA Mercury program.
  • Far Outliers looks how the anti-malarial drug quinine played a key role in allowing Europeans to survive Africa.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox considers grace and climate change.
  • io9 reports on how Jonathan Frakes had anxiety attacks over his return as Riker on Star Trek: Picard.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the threatened banana.
  • Language Log looks at the language of Hong Kong protesters.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how a new version of The Last of the Mohicans perpetuates Native American erasure.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how East Germany remains alienated.
  • Neuroskeptic looks at the participant-observer effect in fMRI subjects.
  • The NYR Daily reports on a documentary looking at the India of Modi.
  • Corey S. Powell writes at Out There about Neptune.
  • The Planetary Society Blog examines the atmosphere of Venus, something almost literally oceanic in its nature.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money considers how Greenland might be incorporated into the United States.
  • Rocky Planet notes how Earth is unique down to the level of its component minerals.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog considers biopolitical conservatism in Poland and Russia.
  • Starts With a Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers if LIGO has made a detection that might reveal the nonexistence of the theorized mass gap between neutron stars and black holes.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at Marchetti’s constant: People in cities, it seems, simply do not want to commute for a time longer than half an hour.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at how the US Chemical Safety Board works.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on how Muslims in the Russian Far North fare.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at cannons and canons.

[URBAN NOTE] Ten Montréal links

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  • La Presse notes the restoration of the old Archambault sign to its location at Sainte-Catherine and Berri. (I am reminded of the Sam the Record Man sign in Toronto.)
  • HuffPostQuebec notes that some of the strings of balls from 18 nuances de gai are up for sale.
  • Expelling Hong Kong activists from the Montréal pride parade should not have been done. CBC Montreal reports.
  • Camillien-Houde Way, on Mount Royal, will become more difficult for cyclists with the removal of a traffic light. CTV reports.
  • Les Forges de Montréal, heritage to the city’s blacksmithing tradition, has been saved. Global News reports.
  • Historian Desmond Morton, of McGill, has died. CBC Montreal reports.
  • The City of Montréal is trying to fight against food insecurity. CBC Montreal U>reports.
  • Craig Desson at CBC Montreal reports on the lasting legacy of Moshe Safdie and Habitat 67, and the replication of this prefabricated concrete model in rising Asia.
  • Actions of clients are the leading causes of delays on the Metro. CBC Montreal reports.