A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘armenia

[BLOG] Five Window on Eurasia links

  • Window on Eurasia notes the post-Soviet collapse of the numbers of learners of the Russian language, here.
  • Window on Eurasia reports the claim of a Russian politician that in 1991, securing the nuclear arsenal of Ukraine was a bigger priority than trying for borders changes, here.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus cannot protect itself from Russia, here.
  • Window on Eurasia explains why the Soviet Union let the Armenians and Georgians keep their alphabets, here.
  • Window on Eurasia explains how Russia’s naval and marine power is not doing well, here.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the first time that an exoplanet, HR 8799e, has been directly observed using optical interferometry.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the possibility, demonstrated by the glimpsing of a circumplanetary disc around exoplanet PDS 70b, that we might be seeing a moon system in formation.
  • The Citizen Science Salon looks what observers in Antarctica are contributing to our wealth of scientific knowledge.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares links to articles looking at the latest findings on the Precambrian Earth.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas writes about his ambivalent response to a Twitter that, by its popularity, undermines the open web.
  • Gizmodo notes that NASA is going to open up the International Space Station to tourists.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how croquet, upon its introduction in the 19th century United States, was seen as scandalous for the way it allowed men and women to mix freely.
  • Shakezula at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the unaccountable fondness of at least two Maine Republican legislators for the Confederacy.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that the economic success of Israel in recent decades is a triumph of neoliberalism.
  • Stephen Ellis at the NYR Daily writes about the gymnastics of Willem de Kooning.
  • Drew Rowsome profiles out comic Brendan D’Souza.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the still strange galaxy NGC 1052-DF2, apparently devoid of dark matter.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever shares his theory about a fixed quantity of flavor in strawberries of different sizes.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a contentious plan for a territorial swap between Armenia and Azerbaijan.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Windsor, Calgary, Mulhouse, Naples, Dhaka

  • This Shane Mitchell op-ed at Spacing warns about how plans for a new hospital in Windsor can threaten to promote sprawl.
  • Debates over bike traffic laws are ongoing in Calgary. Global News reports.
  • Guardian Cities looks at how the downtown of the French city of Mulhouse has been successfully regenerated.
  • Guardian Cities looks at how the infamous housing estate of Scampia outside of Naples, famously derelict and a nexus for crime, is finally being torn down.
  • Atlas Obscura notes an Armenian church in Dhaka, last remnant of a once-vast Armenian trading diaspora that extended out to Bengal.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Kingston, Ottawa, Amsterdam, Madrid, Yerevan

  • Kingston, Ontario, is currently doing its best to cope with flood risk from the rising Lake Ontario. Global News reports.
  • MacLean’s reports on an appalling expansion of the iconic Chateau Laurier in Ottawa.
  • CityLab reports on how Amsterdam is trying to avoid being overwhelmed by tourism.
  • Guardian Cities reports on how the new government in Madrid plans to scrap a low-emissions zone because of a belief that congestion is a Madrid tradition.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares some tips for visitors to Yerevan.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers the possibility of carbon dioxide being a biosignature in the atmospheres of exoplanets.
  • D-Brief notes the discoveries of Hayabusa2 at asteroid Ryugu, including the possibility it was part of a larger body.
  • Gizmodo links to a new analysis suggesting the behaviour of ‘Oumuamua was not so unprecedented after all, that it was a simple exocomet.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at Agnes Chase, an early 20th century biologist who did remarkable things, both with science and with getting women into her field.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money links to a new article of his analyzing the new aircraft carriers of Japan, noting not just their power but the effective lack of limits on Japanese military strength.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the substantial demographic shifts occurring in Kazakhstan since independence, with Kazakh majorities appearing throughout the country.
  • Neuroskeptic considers if independent discussion sections for online papers would make sense.
  • The NYR Daily shares a photo essay by Louis Witter reporting on Moroccan boys seeking to migrate to Europe through Ceuta.
  • Roads and Kingdoms has an interview with photographer Brett Gundlock about his images of Latin American migrants in Mexico seeking the US.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explores the mass extinction and extended ice age following the development of photosynthesis and appearance of atmospheric oxygen on Earth two billion years ago.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, in Karabakh, Jehovah’s Witnesses now constitute the biggest religious minority.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul looks back at its work over 2018.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait reflects on an odd photo of the odd galaxy NGC 3981.
  • The Crux tells the story of how the moons of Jupiter, currently enumerated at 79 and including many oddly-shaped objects in odd orbits, have been found.
  • Gizmodo notes how some astronomers have begun to use the precise rotations of neutron stars to calibrate atomic clocks on Earth.
  • Keiran Healy shares a literally beautiful chart depicting mortality rates in France over two centuries.
  • Hornet Stories notes that, two years after his death, the estate of George Michael is still making donations to the singer’s favoured charities.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox celebrates the Ramones song “I Wanna Be Sedated”.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how unauthorized migrants detained by the United States are being absorbed into the captive workforces of prisons.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution approves of the Museum of the Bible, in Washington D.C., as a tourist destination.
  • The NYR Daily looks at soccer (or football) in Morocco, as a badge of identity and as a vehicle for the political discussions otherwise repressed by the Moroccan state.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the paiche, a fish that is endangered in Peru but is invasively successful in Bolivia.
  • Peter Rukavina makes a good point about the joys of unexpected fun.
  • The Signal reports on how the American Folklife Centre processes its audio recordings in archiving them.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel debunks some myths about black holes, notably that their gravity is any more irresistible than that of any other object of comparable mass.
  • Strange Company shares the contemporary news report from 1878 of a British man who binge-drank himself across the Atlantic to the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on a proposal in the fast-depopulating Magadan oblast of Russia to extend to all long-term residents the subsidies extended to native peoples.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on another Switzerland-like landscape, this one the shoreline around Lake Sevan in Armenia.

[NEWS] Five language links: Armenian, Icelandic, Irish, Ladino, Scots

  • This r/unresolvedmysteries thread asks the question of where the Armenian language, a unique Indo-European language, came from.
  • This Ragnar J√≥nasson article in The Guardian asks the question of how long the Icelandic language, with relatively few speakers and facing a tidal wave of influence from English, can outlast this competition.
  • The Irish Times notes that the Irish language was heard in the British House of Commons for the first time in a century, spoken by a Plaid Cymru MP asking why this language has so little institutional support in Northern Ireland.
  • Over at the BBC, Susanna Zaraysky takes a look at the Ladino language–a Spanish variant–traditionally used by the Sephardic Jews of Bosnia, and how this language is declining here as elsewhere among the Sephardim.
  • Atlas Obscura takes a look at the Scots language, a distinctive Germanic language that was never quite broken away from English, and how this language persists despite everything.