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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘asteroids

[NEWS] Five science links: Chixculub, Venus probes, HS 2231+2441, iPTF14hls, China and SETI

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  • It was the dinosaurs’ bad luck that Chixculub had oil-rich sands, making a bad impact a mass extinction. National Geographic reports.
  • Universe Today takes a look at the challenge of designing electronics capable of surviving the environment of Venus.
  • HS 2231+2441 is a HW Vir-type binary where a brown dwarf sapped the life of its now white dwarf partner. Universe Today reports.
  • CBC reports on puzzling iPTF14hls, a bizarrely recurring supernova. Is it a pulsational pair instability supernova?
  • Will China’s new Tianyan radiotelescope give it an edge in SETI? This is a great article, on China and SETI both. The Atlantic reports.
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[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Centauri Dreams notes the remarkably complex system of Proxima Centauri, with multiple belts and more possible planets, as does D-Brief.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a new sort of fusion reactions, involving not atoms but quarks.
  • Hornet Stories notes a new acoustic cover of the Kinky Boots song “Not My Father’s Son.”
  • Language Hat takes a brief look at Cyrillic, since the Soviet era written in Cyrillic script.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how the Trump Administration is unconcerned by the latest report regarding catastrophic climate change.
  • The LRB Blog notes how Armenia and Armenians remember past genocides and current refugee flows.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the further extension of the Dawn mission at Ceres.
  • Drew Rowsome shares some of Stephen King’s tips for aspiring writers.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how some long-exposure Hubble photographs of galaxies picked up nearby asteroids.
  • John Scalzi shares his cover of “Rocket Man”.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if ISIS is spreading into Russia via migrant workers from Central Asia.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthropology.net notes that interbreeding with Neanderthals restored ancient hominin DNA to homo sapiens.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at signs of planetary formation in cometary rings.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a theory that advanced extraterrestrial civilizations could manipulate pulsars as beacons.
  • Hornet Stories explains what “intersex” means.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the perhaps baffling appeal of Florida real estate at a time of climate change.
  • The LRB Blog considers the radical potential of asteroid mining. Could it help free us from resource scarcity? How should we manage it?
  • Marginal Revolution shares an argument that humans, through transporting life, are increasing biodiversity.
  • The NYR Daily argues that China has too many illusions over its “New Silk Road” initiatives.
  • Peter Rukavina examines the changing shades of green used by GO Transit.
  • Drew Rowsome really likes Toronto musical Bat Out of Hell.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how different non-Russian languages are present on the streets of St. Petersburg.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on the naming of the features of the surface of Ceres.
  • D-Brief notes that small-scale robotic manufacturing is now a thing.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on a new study of exoplanets and their stars.
  • The Dragon’s Tales has a nice round-up of news on hominin research and primates generally.
  • Hornet Stories notes that there is apparently a debate about women as drag queens. I don’t see why they should not, frankly.
  • Joe. My. God links to a Rolling Stone article celebrating Erotica and Sex, by Madonna, on their 25th anniversary.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the way Dollar General caters to a permanent underclass. Like Dollarama in Canada?
  • Language Hat notes that Xibe, related to Manchu, is receiving protection from China.
  • The NYR Daily reports on the mass killings, approaching genocide, in Indonesia in 1965.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on the proofs we have for the current age of the universe.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at enormous, explosive Wolf-Rayet stars, and at WR 124 in particular.
  • The Big Picture shares heart-rending photos of Rohingya refugees fleeing Burma.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the potential of near-future robotic asteroid mining.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of vast cave systems on the Moon, potential homes for settlers.
  • Hornet Stories exposes young children to Madonna’s hit songs and videos of the 1980s. She still has it.
  • Inkfish notes that a beluga raised in captivity among dolphins has picked up elements of their speech.
  • Language Hat notes a dubious claim that a stelae containing Luwian hieroglyphic script, from ancient Anatolia, has been translated.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the question of preserving brutalist buildings.
  • The LRB Blog considers how Brexit, intended to enhance British sovereignty and power, will weaken both.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that the moons and planets of the solar system have been added to Google Maps.
  • The NYR Daily considers how the Burmese government is carefully creating a case for Rohingya genocide.
  • The Power and Money’s Noel Maurer concludes, regretfully, that the market for suborbital travel is just not there.
  • Visiting a shrimp festival in Louisiana, Roads and Kingdoms considers how the fisheries work with the oil industry (or not).
  • Towleroad reports on the apparent abduction in Chechnya of singer Zelimkhan Bakayev, part of the anti-gay pogrom there.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that rebuilding Kaliningrad as a Russian military outpost will be expensive.

[NEWS] Seven science and tech links: GW170814, birds and dinosaurs, asteroid belts, oceans, energy

  • GW170814, detected by VIRGO and LIGO, marks the collision of two black holes, 31 and 25 solar masses, 1.8 billion light-years away. Ars Technica reports.
  • The American Museum of Natural History in New York has a new exhibition linking birds and dinosaurs. National Geographic notes.
  • This new asteroid belt model suggesting it began empty, then filled from the inner and outer system, is interesting. Universe Today goes into more detail.
  • New studies are suggesting that the oceans are starting to warm up. The Guardian reports.
  • Offshore wind farms are apparently serving as platforms for flourishing marine ecologies, starting with mussels. Technology Review examines preliminary findings here.
  • Hydroelectric development in the highlands of Georgia is disrupting already fragile human communities there. Open Democracy reports.
  • Australian scientists may have found the genes causing the small wings of emus. Could they get bigger wings now? The Herald-Sun describes the finding and its import.

[NEWS] Four science links: Neanderthals, oceans and computers, Brazil rainforest, water on Vesta

  • Neanderthals, like contemporary humans, had the sort of prolonged childhoods which lend themselves to intelligence. National Geographic reports.
  • The cool chill water of oceans is starting to be used to cool data centres. VICE reports.
  • Brazil is set to embark on a substantial process to restore Amazonian rainforest. VICE reports.
  • The Dawn probe found evidence of subsurface ice on rocky asteroid-belt protoplanet Vesta. Universe Today reports.