A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘atlantic canada

[ISL] Five islands links: Machias Seal, Newfoundland and Labrador, Orkneys, Haiti

leave a comment »

    <

  • Global News outlines the state of the Machias Seal island territorial dispute between Canada and the United States.
  • Faced with mounting costs owing to an aging and dispersed population, is Newfoundland and Labrador headed for bankruptcy? What would happen then? The National Post reports.
  • The selection of names of beers from the new brewery of Dildo, NL, has been undertaken with great care. Global News reports.
  • The Island Review shares an extract from the new book by Robin Noble about the Orkneys, Sagas of Salt and Stone. http://theislandreview.com/content/sagas-of-salt-and-stone-orkney-unwrapped-robin-noble-extract
  • Ayanna Legros makes a compelling argument for the recognition of Haiti and Haitians as not being somehow foreign to their region, but rather for including them in Latin America.
Advertisements

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Port Hope, Montréal, Shediac, Halifax, Vancouver

leave a comment »

  • Finally, the remediation of the low-level radioactive waste scattered around Port Hope is starting. Global News reports.
  • Will Montréal bring back the Expos? Global News gauges opinion.
  • I congratulate Shediac for winning the world record for the longest lobster roll. Global News reports.
  • The new Glitter Bean Café in Halifax sounds like a fun queer-oriented coffee shop. Global News reports.
  • Terry Glavin argues that the city government of Vancouver is being terribly negligent in allowing the city to be undermined by unregulated income flows. MacLean’s has it.

[ISL] Five Island links: gay bar, Charlottetown housing, Tignish, Filipino Bloomfield, Cavendish

leave a comment »

  • Can Charlottetown support a gay bar? A LGBTQ-oriented place might indeed do better than a nightclub, but even with students and tourists could the city support one? CBC reports.
  • The City of Charlottetown needs to do better on creating affordable housing. The perfect is, after all, the enemy of the good. CBC reports.
  • The West Prince community of Tignish seems to be doing as good a job as it can of remaining a dynamic community, at least according to this CBC article.
  • The Guardian reports on the opening of a Filipino store in Bloomfield, oriented towards the growing Filipino community in that part of the Island.
  • The Cavendish Musical Festival is apparently going well, with a minimum of unexpected issues. (Has anyone reading this ever been there? What is it like?) CBC reports.

[PHOTO] Five links about photos: New Brunswick, Peter Hujar, Willy Ronis, Niko Kallianotis, starship

leave a comment »

  • In the aftermath of a recent flood in Fredericton, the New Brunswick provincial archives helped people salvage their damaged photos. MacLean’s reports.
  • At Another Magazine, Fran Lebowitz shares her memories of friend Peter Hujar.
  • The NYR Daily engages with an exhibit of the Paris photography of Willy Ronis.
  • Wired reports on the photos of small-town America by Greek-born Niko Kallianiotis.
  • Camera deployed on high-speed starships, travelling at relativistic speeds, could take remarkable photos of the faint distant universe. Universe Today reports.

[ISL] Five PEI links: Heat wave, Mill River, theatre props, Black Islanders, Confederation Bridge

leave a comment »

  • CBC PEI reports on the intensity of the heat wave hitting PEI. Frankly, Ontario-like temperatures on the Island were always rare in the past.
  • A bid by indigenous groups on PEI to lay claim to the Mill River golf course on treaty grounds has been dismissed in court. Global News has it.
  • The sheer volume of props accumulated over time by the Confederation Centre of the Arts theatre is noteworthy, if perhaps unsurprising. CBC reports.
  • A black character, Sebastian Lacroix, is being introduced to the new Anne of Green Gables TV show. This is good: Anyone who read Black Islanders by Hornby must know about the black community in Charlottetown’s The Bog that, until now, was hidden. Global News reports.
  • Julie Payette reports that the Confederation Bridge linking the Island to the mainland is, in fact, visible from the International Space Station. CBC has it.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

leave a comment »

Many things accumulated after a pause of a couple of months. Here are some of the best links to come about in this time.

  • Anthrodendum considers the issue of the security, or not, of cloud data storage used by anthropologists.
  • Architectuul takes a look at the very complex history of urban planning and architecture in the city of Skopje, linked to issues of disaster and identity.
  • Centauri Dreams features an essay by Ioannis Kokkidinis, examining the nature of the lunar settlement of Artemis in Andy Weir’s novel of the same. What is it?
  • Crux notes the possibility that human organs for transplant might one day soon be grown to order.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua is actually more like a comet than an asteroid.
  • Bruce Dorminey makes the sensible argument that plans for colonizing Mars have to wait until we save Earth. (I myself have always thought the sort of environmental engineering necessary for Mars would be developed from techniques used on Earth.)
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog took an interesting look at the relationship between hobbies and work.
  • Far Outliers looks at how, in the belle époque, different European empires took different attitudes towards the emigration of their subjects depending on their ethnicity. (Russia was happy to be rid of Jews, while Hungary encouraged non-Magyars to leave.)
  • The Finger Post shares some photos taken by the author on a trip to the city of Granada, in Nicaragua.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas makes an interesting argument as to the extent to which modern technology creates a new sense of self-consciousness in individuals.
  • Inkfish suggests that the bowhead whale has a more impressive repertoire of music–of song, at least–than the fabled humpback.
  • Information is Beautiful has a wonderful illustration of the Drake Equation.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the American women who tried to prevent the Trail of Tears.
  • Language Hat takes a look at the diversity of Slovene dialects, this diversity perhaps reflecting the stability of the Slovene-inhabited territories over centuries.
  • Language Log considers the future of the Cantonese language in Hong Kong, faced with pressure from China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how negatively disruptive a withdrawal of American forces from Germany would be for the United States and its position in the world.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle, notes the usefulness of the term “Latinx”.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the restoration of a late 19th century Japanese-style garden in Britain.
  • The New APPS Blog considers the ways in which Facebook, through the power of big data, can help commodify personal likes.
  • Neuroskeptic reports on the use of ayahusasca as an anti-depressant. Can it work?
  • Justin Petrone, attending a Nordic scientific conference in Iceland to which Estonia was invited, talks about the frontiers of Nordic identity.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw writes about what it is to be a literary historian.
  • Drew Rowsome praises Dylan Jones’ new biographical collection of interviews with the intimates of David Bowie.
  • Peter Rukavina shares an old Guardian article from 1993, describing and showing the first webserver on Prince Edward Island.
  • Seriously Science notes the potential contagiousness of parrot laughter.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little t.com/2018/06/shakespeare-on-tyranny.htmltakes a look at the new Stephen Greenblatt book, Shakespeare on Power, about Shakespeare’s perspectives on tyranny.
  • Window on Eurasia shares speculation as to what might happen if relations between Russia and Kazakhstan broke down.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative noticed, before the election, the serious fiscal challenges facing Ontario.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell points out that creating a national ID database in the UK without issuing actual cards would be a nightmare.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on a strand of his Swiss family’s history found in a Paris building.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Richmond Hill, Kingston, Hamilton, Québec City, Lunenburg

leave a comment »

  • I really have to get up to Richmond Hill soon, if only to see the reopened David Dunlap Observatory. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The City of Kingston and Queen’s University, Global News reports, are going to collaborate to try to prevent street parties. (Student ghetto issues continue, I see.)
  • blogTO provides an ambitious, if perhaps expensive, itinerary for a visit 48 hours long to Hamilton, Ontario, here.
  • Gentrification is starting to place pressure on residents of some neighbourhoods in Québec City. (I am somewhat surprised by this, given that city’s relative insulation from North American trends.) CBC reports.
  • National Observer notes how Lunenburg, in Nova Scotia, is taking a stand against unregulated offshore drilling.