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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘australia

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the discovery of Ross 128 b, a nearby exoplanet that looks like it actually might be plausibly very Earth-like.
  • blogTO notes that, after a decade, the east entrance of the Royal Ontario Museum is finally going to be an entrance again.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about the importance of self-care, of making time to experience pleasure.
  • Crooked Timber shares some of the 1871 etchings of Gustave Doré, fresh from the Paris Commune.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how one man’s collection of old tin cans tells a remarkable story about the settlement of the United States.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a vintage 1980 television report on the Los Angeles punk scene.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a recent study of chemical abundances around Kronos and Krios, two very similar stars near each other, these abundances suggesting they are just forming planetary systems.
  • Gizmodo shares a revealing new table of exoplanets, one that brings out all sorts of interesting patterns and types.
  • Hornet Stories notes Courtney Love’s efforts to fundraise for LGBTQ homeless youth.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Margaret Court, an Australian tennis star now more famous for her homophobia, called for Australia to ignore the postal vote for marriage equality.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that Trump’s Russian links are important to explore, not least because they reveal the spreading influence of kleptocracy.
  • Lingua Franca shares a perhaps over-stereotypical take on languages being caught between drives for purity and for diversity.
  • The LRB Blog notes the murder of Honduran environmental activist Berta Cácares.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an interesting collection of links to future and alternate-history mass transit maps of Melbourne.
  • The NYR Daily links to an interesting exhibit about disposable fashion like the simple T-shirt.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes a remarkable performance of a Beatles song in the hill country of West Bengal.
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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at the exciting early news on potentially habitable nearby exoplanet Ross 128 b.
  • The Crux notes that evidence has been found of Alzheimer-like illness in dolphins. Is this, as the scientists argue, a symptom of a syndrome shared between us, big-brained social species with long post-fertility lifespans?
  • D-Brief takes a look at the idea of contemporary life on Mars hiding away in the icy regolith near the surface.
  • Far Outliers notes one argument that Germany lost the Second World War because of the poor quality of its leaders.
  • Gizmodo notes the incredibly bright event PS1-10adi, two and a half billion light-years away. What is it? No one knows …
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money celebrates the end of the Mugabe dictatorship in Zimbabwe.
  • The Map Room Blog links to some fascinating detailed maps of the outcome of the Australian mail-in vote on marriage equality.
  • Roads and Kingdoms visits rural Mexico after the recent quake.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares some beautiful photos of fantastical Barcelona.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the insights provided by Pluto’s mysterious cool atmosphere, with its cooling haze, has implications for Earth at a time of global warming.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia is not going to allow even Tatarstan to include the Tatar language as a mandatory school subject.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the remarkably enduring supernova iPTF14hls, which seems to have attained its longevity through massive amounts of antimatter.
  • blogTO notes plans for the construction of a new public square in Chinatown, on Huron Street.
  • James Bow shares a short story of his, set in a future where everyone has a guaranteed minimum income but few have a job.
  • A poster at Crasstalk shares a nostalgic story about long-lost summers as a child in Albuquerque in the 1960s.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on Universe, a beautiful book concerned with the history of astronomical imagery.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog explores the latent and manifest functions of education for job-seekers.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel talks about the Red Terror imposed by Lenin in 1918, and its foreshadowing of the future of the Soviet Union.
  • Language Hat links to a lovely analysis of a Tang Chinese poem, “On the Frontier.”
  • Language Log notes how the name of Chinese food “congee” ultimately has origins in Dravidian languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes note of the suspicious timing of links between the Trump family and Wikileaks.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen recounts his visit to an Amazon bookstore, and what he found lacking (or found good).
  • The NYR Daily notes the continuing controversy over the bells of the church of Balangiga, in the Philippines, taken as booty in 1901 by American forces and not returned.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders why Canadian incomes and productivity have historically been 20-30% lower than those of the United States, and why incomes have lately caught up.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the simple pleasures of an egg and cracker snack in the Faroe Islands.
  • Strange Company considers the bizarre 1910 murder of Massachusetts lawyer William Lowe Rice.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes an Australian publisher that suspended publication of a book in Australia for fear of negative reaction from China.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some photos of his orchids, blooming early because of warm temperatures.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams looks at the design of Japan for a laser-fueled ion engine for deep space probe IKAROS, destined for the Trojans of Jupiter.
  • The Crux notes the achievements of Jane Goodall, not least for recognizing non-human animals have personalities.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on a model detailing the accretion of massive planets from icy pebbles.
  • Hornet Stories shares Tori Amos talking about her late gay friend, makeup artist Kevyn Aucoin.
  • Language Log reports on a powerful essay regarding the writing of the first Navajo-English dictionary.
  • The NYR Daily notes how the Russian government of Putin is trying to deal with the Russian Revolution by not recognizing it.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the efforts of a visitor to drink the signature ikigage beer of Rwanda, brewed from sorghum.
  • Drew Rowsome quite likes the Guillermo del Toro exhibit at the Art Gallery of Ontario. (I should go, too.)
  • Towleroad notes early supports suggesting the Australian postal vote on same-sex marriage will be a crushing victory for the good guys.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the pressure of new education changes on smaller minority languages in Russia.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlyn Kelly talks about the rejuvenating effects of “forest bathing”. I quite agree, myself.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the idea of Project Blue, a dedicated astronomy satellite to look for exoplanets at Alpha Centauri.
  • D-Brief notes that astrophysicists have verified an eclipse described in the Bible circa 1207 BCE.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to another KIC 8462852 study, finding its dimming is best explained by circumstellar debris.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog notes the importance of being careful with the use of numbers.
  • Far Outliers explores how Singapore managed to position itself as a safe destination for tourists visiting Asia.
  • Language Hat links to a beautiful passage from Kim Stanley Robinson’s Aurora on the messiness of language.
  • Language Log takes a look at the phenomenon of headlessness in the propaganda of North Korea.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the sad short life of Stanwix Melville.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares multiple images, with multiple perspectives, of Giordano Bruno crater on the Moon.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw finds the use of Section 44 of the Australian Constitution to disqualify politicians as dual nationals ridiculous.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares some beautiful photos of Saint-Tropez.
  • Arnold Zwicky meditates on language, moving from the strange names of the parts of flowers to the X-Men.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Anthropology.net notes evidence that injured Neanderthals were cared for by their kin.
  • James Bow shares a photo of Ottawa at night and considers the growing city with its greenbelt.
  • Centauri Dreams reacts to the immense discoveries surrounding GW170817.
  • Crooked Timber considers the vexed nature of the phrase “Judeo-Christian.”
  • Bruce Dorminey notes an American government study suggesting a North Korean EMP attack could cause collapse.
  • Hornet Stories reports that Russian pop singer Zelimkhan Bakaev has been murdered in Chechnya as part of the anti-gay purges.
  • Language Hat looks at lunfardo, the Italian-inflicted argot of Buenos Aires.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that, with Trump undermining the US, the prospects of China’s rise to define the new world order are looking good.
  • The NYR Daily looks at reports of significant electoral fraud in Kenya.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at the continuing Australian reaction to China’s Belt and Road project.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from Sichuan’s peppercorn fields at harvest time.
  • Drew Rowsome responds to Andrew Pyper’s new novel, The Only Child.
  • Strange Company looks at the mysterious 1900 woman of New Yorker Kathryn Scharn.
  • Strange Maps looks at an ingenious, if flawed, map of the Berlin metro dating from the 1920s.
  • Peter Watts considers the question of individual identity over time. What changes, what stays the same?
  • Window on Eurasia notes that a shift from their native languages to Russian will not end minority ethnic identities.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting exoplanet transits could start a galactic communications network.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the connections between eating and identity.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas looks at the need for a critical study of the relationship between technology and democracy.
  • Language Hat notes how nationalism split Hindustani into separate Hindi and Urdu languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reflects on the grim outlook in Somalia after the terrible recent Mogadishu bombing.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen thinks Trump’s decertification of the Iran deal is a bad idea.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an article imagining a counter-mapping of the Amazon by indigenous peoples.
  • Neuroskeptic considers the possibility of Parkinson’s being a prion disease, somewhat like mad cow disease.
  • The NYR Daily notes that a Brexit driven by a perceived need to take back control will not meet that need, at all.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at the problem Sydney faces as it booms.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the extent to which an independent Catalonia would be ravaged economically by a non-negotiated secession.
  • Peter Watts tells the sad story of an encounter between Toronto police and a homeless man he knows.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a Sakhalin bridge, like a Crimea bridge, may not come off because of Russian weakness.