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Posts Tagged ‘australia

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares a stunning photo of two galaxies colliding in the eternal night and considers the implications of the Milky Way’s future encounter with Andromeda.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the latest discoveries regarding FRB 121102 and fast radio bursts generally.
  • Hornet Stories suggests that a recent ruling by the Inter American Court of Human Rights sets the stage for marriage equality across Latin America.
  • Inkfish notes that the biomass of dead squid mothers plays a major role in the environments and ecologies of seafloors.
  • JSTOR Daily suggests retirees can actually learn a lot from the lifestyles of members of the RV–recreational vehicle–community.
  • Language Hat reports on wordplay, and its translations, in the works of Homer.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the turn to anti-intellectualism among American conservatives.
  • At Lingua Franca, William Germano talks about telling numbers.
  • The LRB Blog notes the story of the English village of Imber, intentionally depopulated by the British military during the Second World War and never allowed to be restored.
  • The NYR Daily talks about a London exhibition on the art of our era of terrorism and terror.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest Juno discoveries from Jupiter.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell reports on a debate as to whether the origin of life is a more difficult question than the origin of consciousness.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the simple pleasures of an iced coffee enjoyed in the Australian Outback.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel U>considers an interesting question: is ours the only advanced civilization in the universe?
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little tackles the concept of organizational cultures.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that post-1991 immigrants from the former Soviet Union form a tenth of the Russian labour force.
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[NEWS] Four culture links: Tim Horton’s, Patuá in Macau, firebirds, humpback whales

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  • Edward Keenan points out that the reluctance of Tim Horton’s franchises to accommodate the new Ontario minimum wage is really hurting their all-Canadian branding, writing at the Toronto Star.
  • Matthew Keegan at The Guardian examines the imminent demise of Patua, the Portuguese-based creole now spoken by only a very few people in Macau.
  • Of course multiple species of birds in Australia have developed the cultural trait of active helping wildfires expand in their own interest. It is Australia, right? The National Post reports.
  • Live Science suggests that the humpback whale that saved a diver from a shark attack may not have been planning to do just that. I wonder …

[ISL] Five notes on Islands: Madeira, imaginary places, thylacine, Ōkunoshima rabbit, volcanic Tonga

  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper examining how a speculative sugar boom in early modern Madeira was the first of its kind.
  • Simon Worrall interviews author Malachy Tallack about the latter’s book of imaginary places, notably islands.
  • News that the DNA of a preserved thylacine has been salvaged is fantastic. Besides the scientific interest of this, could this lead to the resurrection of this Tasmanian species?
  • Elaina Zachos notes the many problems facing the many cute rabbits product of a recent introduction to the Japanese island of Ōkunoshima.
  • A volcanic island that recently emerged from the sea off of Tonga turns out to be much more durable than scientists had expected.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthropology net reports on the unveiling of Little Foot, a 3.6 million year old australopithecus skeleton.
  • The Big Picture unveiled remarkable photos of the ongoing wildfires in southern California.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a suggestion of Jim Benford suggesting we are not transmitting loudly enough to be picked up across interstellar distances.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of genes which appear to have some relationship to sexual orientation variation among human men.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how DNA evidence can lead to false convictions.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares some links about extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that an opposite-sex couple in Australia who promised to divorce on the advent of marriage equality have opted not to. Surprise, surprise.

  • The Map Room Blog shares some maps examining the possibility of an electoral upset in the Alabama Senate race.
  • Marginal Revolution points out the extent to which Chicago was a huge boomtown in the 19th century.
  • The NYR Daily shares the proletarian art–literally–of Chaïm Soutine.
  • Out There takes a look at how our ill treatment of gorillas bodes ill for our treatment of hypothetical less advanced aliens.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Moscow, without restrictions on urban migration, is starting to develop ethnic neighbourhoods. (I think this natural, and fundamentally a good thing, unlike the source.)
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a report of a 1971 jam session of John Lennon with Frank Zappa.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Architectuul considers the humanizing potential of brutalism in the context of a London filled with impersonal skyscrapers.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the ways the habitable-zone super-Earths of K2-18 reveal our solar system to be exceptional.
  • Centauri Dreams notes evidence for active plate tectonics in the ice crust of Europa, suggesting an ocean being replenished with nutrients and possibly suitable for life.
  • D-Brief notes the sourcing of the iron in the artifacts of the Bronze Act in meteorites.
  • Daily JSTOR reports on how Hollywood coped during the Red Scare of the 1950s.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the exciting discovery of tapes recording Devo jamming with David Bowie and Brian Eno.
  • Cody Delistraty considers if the restitution of artworks looted from once-colonized territories might not be a cheap substitute for deeper changes.
  • Language Hat shares a student essay comparing, during the First World War, the United States’ campaign against German and the German campaign against French.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues against a British nostalgia for monarchy and empire that overlooks the real injustices perpetrated at Britain’s imperial peak.
  • Lingua Franca notes the remarkable power of the #metoo movement.
  • The LRB Blog notes the exceptional complexity of the issue of Jerusalem, especially after Trump’s actions.
  • The Map Room Blog shares links to a variety of maps of the Halifax Explosion and its effects.
  • The NYR Daily looks at some of the legacies of the Salvadoran civil war.
  • Peter Watts makes an argument in favour of the dystopia in contemporary science fiction.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla reports that South Korea is planning its first Moon expedition for 2020.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that Argentina, at its peak, offered as good or even better chances for social mobility for immigrants than the United States.
  • Peter Rukavina shares a photograph showing the electronic system used by defunct Charlottetown nightclub Myron’s for dispensing drinks.
  • Towleroad reports on one consequence of Australia’s acceptance of gay marriage: Will Calvin Harris remix the Spice Girls song “2 Become 1”, as he promised?
  • Window on Eurasia shares a list of eight reasons explaining why Finland was unique in the former Russian Empire in maintaining its independence from Moscow.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the bizarre extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua, as does Centauri Dreams, as does Bruce Dorminey. Yes, this long cylindrical extrasolar visitor swinging around the sun on a hyperbolic orbit does evoke classic SF.
  • The Boston Globe’s The Big Picture shares some photos of autumn from around the world.
  • D-Brief examines how artificial intelligences are making their own videos, albeit strange and unsettling ones.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some Alfred Stieglitz photos of Georgia O’Keefe.
  • Daily JSTOR takes a look at the mulberry tree craze in the United States.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining at water delivery to terrestrial planets in other solar systems. Worlds with as little water as Earth are apparently difficult to produce in this model.
  • Hornet Stories profiles the gay destination of Puerto Vallarta, in Mexico.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the new vulnerability of Haitian migrants in the United States.
  • The LRB Blog notes the end of the Mugabe era in Zimbabwe.
  • The NYR Daily features a stellar Elaine Showalter review of a Sylvia Plath exhibition at the Smithsonian National Picture Gallery.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reports on how the production of New England Cheese reflects the modernization of Australian agriculture.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the awkward position of Rohingya refugees in India, in Jammu, at a time when they are facing existential pressures from all sides.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares twenty beautiful photos of Mars.
  • Towleroad shares a fun video from Pink, “Beautiful Trauma”, featuring Channing Tatum.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that a Trump executive order threatening sanctuary cities has been overturned in court.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one study claiming that the children of immigrant workers in Russia tend to do better than children of native-born Russians.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the discovery of Ross 128 b, a nearby exoplanet that looks like it actually might be plausibly very Earth-like.
  • blogTO notes that, after a decade, the east entrance of the Royal Ontario Museum is finally going to be an entrance again.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about the importance of self-care, of making time to experience pleasure.
  • Crooked Timber shares some of the 1871 etchings of Gustave Doré, fresh from the Paris Commune.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how one man’s collection of old tin cans tells a remarkable story about the settlement of the United States.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a vintage 1980 television report on the Los Angeles punk scene.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a recent study of chemical abundances around Kronos and Krios, two very similar stars near each other, these abundances suggesting they are just forming planetary systems.
  • Gizmodo shares a revealing new table of exoplanets, one that brings out all sorts of interesting patterns and types.
  • Hornet Stories notes Courtney Love’s efforts to fundraise for LGBTQ homeless youth.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Margaret Court, an Australian tennis star now more famous for her homophobia, called for Australia to ignore the postal vote for marriage equality.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that Trump’s Russian links are important to explore, not least because they reveal the spreading influence of kleptocracy.
  • Lingua Franca shares a perhaps over-stereotypical take on languages being caught between drives for purity and for diversity.
  • The LRB Blog notes the murder of Honduran environmental activist Berta Cácares.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an interesting collection of links to future and alternate-history mass transit maps of Melbourne.
  • The NYR Daily links to an interesting exhibit about disposable fashion like the simple T-shirt.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes a remarkable performance of a Beatles song in the hill country of West Bengal.