A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘australia

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthrodendum recommends design researcher Jan Chipchase’s Field Study Handbook for anthropologists interested in field practice.
  • Architectuul investigates strange similarities between buildings built in far-removed parts of the world.
  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at TESS, the next generation of exoplanet-hunting satellite.
  • Crooked Timber investigates the connections between the spiritualism of the 19th century and the fiction of the uncanny.
  • D-Brief notes the many names, often delightful, that newly-discovered locations on Mercury and Charon have received.
  • Cody Delistraty investigates two exhibitions of French satirists, including Charlie Hedo’s Georges Wolinski, to examine the nature of satire.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers the possibility of cryomagna leaving marks on the surface of Europa.
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the strangely alien skies of TRAPPIST-1e. What would its sun look like? How would the other planets appear?
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the new prominence of multigenerational households in the United States. While a response to economic strains, it also looks back to past traditions.
  • Hornet Stories notes how, on RuPaul’s Drag Race, Monet X Change gave a decent explanation behind the surprisingly recent birth of the modern British accent.
  • Imageo notes how a massive blob of warm water is rising to the surface of the Pacific.
  • At In A State of Migration, Lyman Stone explores the unique population history of Maine, to my eyes easily the most Atlantic Canadian of the fifty American states.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper exploring why modern video games can produce such rewarding experiences for players. (We can get meaning from many places.)
  • Language Log takes a look at the complexity of Chinese language classifications with a song by Yishi Band. What exactly is Yibin Sichuanese?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at an interesting question: When did Jews in the United States become white?
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at the baffling reasons behind the poisoning of the Skribins with Novichok, and the science behind it.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that this year, GDP per capita measured at PPP in Spain is higher than in Italy. (This probably says more about the disarray in Italy.)
  • The NYR Daily shares an interesting interview with cartoonist Art Spiegelman.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw tells of his experiences on a trip to the small Australian city of Armidale, in the region of New England.
  • Justin Petrone reflects on the tidy and clean, minimalist even, rural landscape of Estonia.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell notes brain scans that provide evidence of consciousness even in very young infants.
  • Drew Rowsome praises the Toronto production of the musical Fun Home, based on the Alison Bechdel graphic novel. I, for one, can’t wait to see it.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, although Proxima Centauri is far too active a star for Proxima Centauri b to be Earth-like, that world could still plausibly host life-supporting environments.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy suggests a recent deal at the federal level in the US between Trump and Cory Gardner has created space for states to legalize marijuana without fear of federal intervention.
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[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Montréal, Utrecht, Vilnius, Saint-Louis, Sydney

  • For perhaps understandable political reason, Québec premier Philippine Couilllard wants Bombardier to get the Montreal metro renewal contract. Global News reports.
  • Utrecht, Noisey notes, has a thriving black metal scene worthy of extended exploration.
  • The bohemian enclave of Užupis, in the middle of the Lithunian capital of Vilnius, is starting to face pressure from gentrification. Politico Europe reports.
  • Ciku Kimeria at Okay Africa makes the case for the old colonial capital of Saint-Louis, in Senegal, to become a major destination for international tourists.
  • The Guardian profiles a serious proposal to split Sydney into three different cities, each with its own development needs, to better manage the wider conurbation.

[ISL] Five islands links: Malta, East Timor, Choctaw, Ireland, April Fool’s Day

  • Malta, it seems from this New Statesman take, is facing serious problems of corruption through its role in international finance.
  • The establishment of a new maritime border between Australia and East Timor threatens Australia’s borders with adjacent Indonesia. ABC reports.
  • Ireland has established a scholarship program for Choctaw students as a sign of thanks for Choctaw aid during the Irish Potato Famine. The Irish Post reports.
  • This Slugger O’Toole article suggests that the disparity in living standards and income between the Republic and Northern Ireland is not nearly so vast as GDP would suggest.
  • The Map Room Blog shared this Ordinance Survey’s April Fool’s Day joke, of a fake but realistic island.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Vaughan, Markham, Hamilton, Vancouver and Seattle, Melbourne

  • The cancellation of some condos being built at the Vaughan Metropolitan Centre has left their buyers unhappy, and justifiably so. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The rapid growth of Vaughan and Markham, to the north of Toronto, is of international note. The Conversation has it.
  • Kathleen Wynne is promising to protect (what’s left of) the Hamilton steel industry. CBC reports.
  • A direct air shuttle between Vancouver and Seattle is a good thing, but I think that cross-border area would be even better served by some sort of mass transit link. Global News has it.
  • Melbourne, that city of Australia, is facing familiar issue of growth and livability. The Guardian has it.

[ISL] Five islands links: Qatar, Boracay, Vanuatu, Shetlands, CocoCay

  • Saudi Arabia is planning to dig a canal the length of its border with Qatar, making that peninsular polity and island one. That is … intense. Gulf News reports.
  • The Filipino resort island of Boracay has been declared off-limits by President Duterte, at least until its environment is rehabilitated. The National Post reports.
  • The establishment of a Chinese base in Melanesian Vanuatu would upset geopolitical calculations in Australia. The Sydney Morning Herald reports.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that some supporters of Scotland’s Shetland Islands are opposed to the idea of putting the archipelago, so far from the mainland, in inset maps.
  • Royal Caribbean is making an island in the Bahamas, CocoCay, into a custom-designed resort at a cost of hundreds of millions of dollars. Bloomberg reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Montréal, Wayne, Sydney, Istanbul, Irkutsk

  • Controversy continues over the construction of a commuter rail link in Montréal’s West Island. Global News reports.
  • The New Jersey town of Wayne is going to have to adjust to an economy without Toys R Us, based there. Bloomberg reports.
  • Property prices have fallen in Sydney for the seventh month in a row, those prices outside Sydney are rising. Bloomberg reports.
  • Plans to construct a new shipping canal through the Bosphorus, at Istanbul, may have negative effects for the strait and the city. National Geographic reports.
  • The Guardian takes a look at the Siberian city of Irkutsk, a metropolis that apparently can lay claim to a long tradition of cultural and other dissent, here.

[NEWS] Five science links: Ukraine in space, Archean Earth, oceans of Mars, looking for life, Icarus

  • Ukraine is interested in funding spaceport developments in Australia. Transitions Online reports.
  • National Geographic notes evidence that the influx of oxygen into the Archean atmosphere more than two billion years ago was–geologically, at least–quite sudden.
  • Universe Today notes that volcanism on early Mars may have helped fill that planet’s primordial oceans.
  • National Geographic takes a look at the various strategies hypothetical extraterrestrial civilizations could adopt to find life–even us–from a great distance.
  • The discovery of Icarus, a discrete blue supergiant star detected nine billion light-years away, is a triumph of modern astronomy. VICE reports.