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Posts Tagged ‘austria

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how TESS detected a star being torn apart by a distant black hole.
  • Centauri Dreams’ Paul Gilster looks at the past and future of the blog.
  • Crooked Timber takes on the sensitive issue of private schools in the United Kingdom.
  • The Crux considers the question of why women suffer from Alzheimer’s at a higher frequency than men.
  • D-Brief notes a study suggesting that saving the oceans of the Earth could reduce the effects of global warming by 20%.
  • Bruce Dorminey considers a paper suggesting that, if not for its volcanic resurfacing, Venus could have remained an Earth-like world to this day.
  • The Dragon’s Tale notes that NASA will deploy a cubesat in the proposed orbit of the Lunar Gateway station to make sure it is a workable orbit.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina looks at Soyuz T-10a, the first crewed mission to abort on the launch pad.
  • Gizmodo reports on a paper arguing that we should intentionally contaminate Mars (and other bodies?) with our world’s microbes.
  • io9 looks at how Warner Brothers is trying to control, belatedly, the discourse around the new Joker movie.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how, in industrializing London, women kidnapped children off the streets.
  • Language Hat links to a page examining the Arabic and Islamic elements in Dune.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at a new documentary examining the life of Trump mentor Roy Cohn.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how BBC protocols are preventing full discussion of public racism.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at different efforts to reimagining the subway map of New York City.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper claiming that increased pressure on immigrants to assimilate in Italy had positive results.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the background to George Washington’s statements about the rightful place of Jews in the United States.
  • Casey Dreier at the Planetary Society Blog looks at the political explanation of the massive increase in the planetary defense budget of NASA.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the Rocky Horror Show, with its celebration of sexuality (among other things).
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers why there are so many unexpected black holes in the universe.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps examines why Google Street View is not present in Germany (and Austria).
  • The Volokh Conspiracy reports on a ruling in a UK court that lying about a vasectomy negates a partner’s consent to sex.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the controversy about some Buryat intellectuals about giving the different dialects of their language too much importance.

[NEWS] Five cultural links: Hitler, Internet, Nova Scotia roads, BC gangs, Pontic Greek

  • The BBC takes a look at Pontic Greek, a Greek dialect that survives precariously in exile from its homeland in Anatolia.
  • Klaus Meyer writes at The Conversation about how Hitler, in his rise to power, became a German citizen.
  • Low-income families in the Toronto area face serious challenges in getting affordable Internet access. CBC reports.
  • Jeremy Keefe at Global News takes a look at Steve Skafte, an explorer of abandoned roads in Nova Scotia.
  • In some communities in British Columbia, middle-class people have joined criminal gangs for social reasons. CBC reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Winnipeg, Vancouver, Stockholm, Vienna, Mariupol

  • The salvaging and restoration of the Fortune Block in downtown Winnipeg is a victory indeed for preservationists. CBC reports.
  • One hopes that Vancouver manages to settle on a plan for revitalizing its West End beaches. Global News reports
  • Guardian Cities suggests that Stockholm has done a good job of keeping a proper work-life balance for its residents.
  • Guardian Cities reports on the specific contributions of women to modern Vienna.
  • Open Democracy reported before the Ukraine elections from the Donbas front line city of Mariupol, seeing how exhausted the locals were.

[AH] Five #alternatehistory maps from r/imaginarymaps: Germany, Britain, Africa, Japan, Iran

  • r/imaginarymaps imagines a Germany united along religious lines, Protestant areas falling under Prussia and Catholic ones under Austria.
  • Reddit’s imaginarymaps imagines a republican Great Britain. When could republicanism have taken off in the British Isles as a whole?
  • Reddit’s imaginarymaps shares a map of a former Portuguese colony of Zambezia, a Lusophone nation stretching from the Atlantic at Namibia east through to Mozambique.
  • This r/imaginarymaps map, imagining a Japan (and northeast Asia generally) split into sheres of influence by rival European powers, treaty ports and all, surely describes a worst-case scenario for 19th century Japan. How likely was this?
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines an Iran that, following a 9/11-style attack by Lebanese terrorists in Moscow, ends up partitioned between Soviet and US-Arab spheres of influence.

[AH] Five #alternatehistory maps from r/imaginarymaps: France, Austria, Slovenia, Japanese Empire

  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines an early medieval France that became not a notional kingdom but rather a decentralized empire, a Holy Roman Empire of the French Nation.
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines a greater Austria that includes Slovenia.
  • A Greater Slovenia, encompassing lands from Austria, Italy, and even Hungary, is the subject of this r/imaginarymaps map.
  • Could an Austria divided in the Cold War be divided like this r/imaginarymaps map?
  • This r/imaginarymaps map shows a Japanese Empire that survived until 1956, encompassing much of the Russian Far East as well as Manchuria and Korea.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: TTC, Vienna, Zed 80, Toronto of the Future

  • Cameron MacLeod at Spacing considers the poor record of the province of Ontario with supporting the TTC.
  • Steve Munro, writing at NOW Toronto, looks at how the cost of the TTC to the provincial government is inevitably set to climb hugely.
  • blogTO shares a list of five things Toronto can learn from Vienna.
  • A second arcade bar is set to open in Toronto, Zed 80 on the Danforth. blogTO reports.
  • Urban Toronto notes that the latest iteration of the Toronto of the Future conference is set for the end of June.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes evidence that white dwarf Gaia J1738–0826 is eating its planets.
  • Crux takes a look at the stars closely orbiting Sagittarius A* at the heart of the galaxy like relativity-proving S2.
  • D-Brief notes a recent proposal for an unmanned probe to Uranus and Neptune.
  • Dangerous Minds shows the eerily decomposing sculptures of Yuichi Ikehata.
  • Bruce Dorminey explores the provocative idea of era in the early Moon where it was briefly habitable.
  • Far Outliers explores the reasons why George Orwell has become so popular lately.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Tom Daley has recently posed nude for a painting by the celebrated David Hockney.
  • JSTOR Daily explores the reality behind the imminent arrival of the laser gun into militaries worldwide.
  • Language Hat notes that the Austrian state of Vorarlberg sponsors an interesting contest, of performances of songs–including pop songs–in local dialect.
  • The LRB Blog notes the severity of the forest fires in Greece, aggravated by climate change, systematic corruption, and recent austerity.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares photos of asteroid Ryugu taken by the Hayabusa2 probe.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on a T-bone steak heavy breakfast lasting twenty hours in Bilbao.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes a joke political party in Hungary that wants to make the country smaller.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Ukrainian Orthodox Church under Moscow is caught between its Ukrainian goals and its Russian links.