A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘babylon

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of the Triangulum galaxy.
  • The Crux notes how innovative planning and recovery missions helped many NASA missions, like the Hubble and Kepler telescopes, improve over time.
  • Sea stars on the Pacific coast of North America, D-Brief notes, are starting to die out en masse.
  • David Finger at the Finger Post shows his readers his recent visit to the Incan ruins at Ollantaytambo, in Peru.
  • Gizmodo notes how astronomers accidentally found the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Bedin I a mere 30 million light years away.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the new evidence supporting the arguments of W.E.B. Dubois that black resistance under slavery helped the Confederacy lose the US Civil War.
  • Language Hat notes the discovery of a new trilingual inscription in Iran, one combining the Persian, Elamite, and Babylonian languages.
  • Language Log notes the impending death of the Arabic dialect of old Mosul, and notes what its speakers are said to talk like birds.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns, and Money thinks that if Cary Booker does not win the Democratic nomination for 2020, he will at least push the discourse leftwards.
  • Marginal Revolution notes new evidence that the post-1492 depopulation of the Americas led directly to the global cooling of the Little Ice Age.
  • Neuroskeptic considers the ways in which emergence, at different levels, could be a property of the human brain.
  • The NYR Daily features an excerpt from the new Édouard Louis book, Who Killed My Father, talking about the evolution relationship with his father over time.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw muses on the potential for a revival of print journalism in Australia.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews journalist Jason Rezaian on the subject of his new book about his long imprisonment in Iran.
  • Drew Rowsome writes about how censorship, on Facebook and on Blogspot, harms his writing and his ability to contribute to his communities.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel writes</a about how galaxy clusters lead to the premature death of stellar formation in their component galaxies.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a new poll from Ukraine suggesting most Orthodox Christians there identify with the new Ukrainian national church, not the Russian one.
  • Arnold Zwicky talks about language, editing, and error.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Architectuul interviews Vladimir Kulić, curator of the MoMA exhibition Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980, about the history of innovative architecture in Yugoslavia.
  • The Crux takes a look at the long search for hidden planets in the solar system, starting with Neptune and continuing to Tyche.
  • D-Brief notes that ISRO, the space agency of India, is planning on launching a mission to Venus, and is soliciting outside contributions.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage writes about his efforts to photograph, from space, clouds over California’s Mount Whitney.
  • Earther notes that geoengineering is being considered as one strategy to help save the coral reefs.
  • Gizmodo takes a look at the limits, legal and otherwise, facing the Internet Archive in its preservation of humanity’s online history.
  • JSTOR Daily explains why the Loch Ness monster has the scientific binominal Nessiteras rhombopteryx.
  • Language Hat links to “The Poor Man of Nippur”, a short film by Cambridge academic Martin Worthington that may be the first film in the Babylonian language.
  • The LRB Blog notes the conflict between West Bank settlers and Airbnb. Am I churlish to wish that neither side wins?
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper noting how quickly, after Poland regained its independence, human capital differences between the different parts of the once-divided country faded.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel takes a look at what it takes, in terms of element abundance and galactic structure, for life-bearing planets to form in the early universe, and when they can form.