A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘baltic states

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Fredericton, Amsterdam, Athens, Barcelona, Riga

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  • The city of Fredericton hopes a new strategy to attracting international migration to the New Brunswick capital will help its grow its population by 25 thousand. Global News reports.
  • Guardian Cities notes the controversy in Amsterdam as users of moped find themselves being pushed from using bike lanes.
  • Guardian Cities looks at how many in Athens think the city might do well to unbury the rivers covered under concrete and construction in the second half of the 20th century.
  • The Sagrada Familia, after more than 130 years of construction, has finally received a permit for construction from Barcelona city authorities. Global News reports.
  • Evan Gershkovich at the Moscow Times reports on how the recent ousting of the mayor of the Latvian capital of Riga for corruption is also seem through a lens of ethnic conflict.

[PHOTO] Some photography links: CONTACT, Christopher Porter, Don McCullis, Antanas Sutkus, Laos

  • NOW Toronto profiles some eye-catching exhibits part of the Contact Photography Festival.
  • Toronto Life profiles some recently recovered photos by Christopher Porter dating from the 1990s.
  • The NYR Daily took a look at the war-themed photographs of Don McCullin, here.
  • The NYR Daily examines the work of Antanas Sutkus, who began his work in Soviet Lithuania.
  • These images of the legacies of the Vietnam War in Laos, decades later, are stunning. VICE has them.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomy shares Hubble images of asteroid 6478 Gault, seemingly in the process of dissolving.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the experience of living in a body one knows from hard experience to be fallible.
  • Gizmodo notes new evidence that environmental stresses pushed at least some Neanderthals to engage in cannibalism.
  • Hornet Stories notes the 1967 raid by Los Angeles police against the Black Cat nightclub, a pre-Stonewall trigger of LGBTQ organization.
  • Imageo notes the imperfect deal wrought by Colorado Basin states to minimize the pain felt by drought in that river basin.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the cinema of Claire Denis.
  • Language Log reports on the work of linguist Ghil’ad Zuckermann, a man involved in language revival efforts in Australia after work in Israel with Hebrew.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders if the Iran-Contra scandal will be a precedent for the Mueller report, with the allegations being buried by studied inattention.
  • Marginal Revolution makes a case for NIMBYism leading to street urination.
  • Justin Petrone at North! looks at a theatrical performance of a modern Estonian literary classic, and what it says about gender and national identity.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw makes the case for a treaty with Australian Aborigines, to try to settle settler-indigenous relations in Australia.
  • John Quiggin looks at the factors leading to the extinction of coal as an energy source in the United Kingdom.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that we are not yet up to the point of being able to detect exomoons of Earth-like planets comparable to our Moon.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the occasion of the last singer in the Ket language.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some cartoon humour, around thought balloons.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the genesis of ocean worlds. Having a nearly massive star producing lots of radioactive aluminum when it supernovas might be surprisingly important.
  • The Crux takes a look at languages newly forming in the world around us, starting with the Australian language of Light Warlpiri. What does this say about humans and language?
  • D-Brief notes that researchers have managed to create cyborg rats whose motions are controlled directly by human thought.
  • Gizmodo reports on the abandonment by Amazon of its plan for a HQ2 campus in Queens.
  • JSTOR Daily shares the perfectly believable argument that people with autism should not be viewed as people incapable of love.
  • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, Simon Balto writes about how the Ryan Adams scandal demonstrates the male gatekeeper effect in popular music.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution comes up with a list of winners and losers of the Amazon decision not to set up HQ2 in Queens. (Myself, I am unconvinced New York City is a loser here.)
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how, despite not interacting directly with normal matter, dark matter can still be heated up by the matter and energy we see around us.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, in many post-Soviet countries including the Baltic States and Ukraine, ethnic Russians are assimilating into local majority ethnic groups.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Wasaga Beach, Montréal, Barcelona, Narva, Luanda

  • The question of how to develop, or redevelop, the Georgian Bay resort town of Wasaga Beach is ever-pressing. Global News reports.
  • Le Devoir enters the discussion over the Royalmount development, arguing that the city of Montréal needs to fight urban sprawl.
  • Guardian Cities reports on the efforts of Barcelona to keep its street kiosks, home to a thriving culture, alive in the digital age.
  • The New York Times reports on how the government of Estonia is trying to use pop culture to help bind the Russophone-majority city of Narva into the country.
  • This Guardian Cities photo essay takes a look at how the Angolan capital of Luanda, after a long economic boom driven by oil, is rich but terribly unequal.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • David Price at {anthro}dendum considers, going through archival material from the 1950s, the number of radical anthropologists in the US as yet little known or unknown who were marginalized by the Red Scare.
  • Centauri Dreams ruminates on a paper examining ‘Oumuamua that considers radiation pressure as a factor in its speed. Might it work as–indeed, be?–a lightsail?
  • D-Brief notes the various reasons why the Chinese proposal for an artificial moon of sorts, to illuminate cities at night, would not work very well at all.
  • The Dragon’s Tales touches on the perhaps hypocritical anger of Russia at the United States’ departure from the INF treaty.
  • Far Outliers notes the sharp divides among Nazi prisoners of war in a camp in Texas, notably between pro- and anti-Nazi prisoners.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing revisits the original sin of the Internet culture, its imagining of a split between an individual’s virtual life and the remainder of their life.
  • The Island Review welcomes, and interviews, its new editor C.C. O’Hanlon.
  • JSTOR Daily explores the reasons for considering climate change to be a national security issue.
  • Language Hat is enthused by the recent publication of a new dictionary of the extinct Anatolian languages of the Indo-European family.
  • Language Log examines the existence of a distinctive, even mocked, southern French accent spoken in and around (among other cities) Toulouse.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the rise of fascism in Brazil with Bolsonaro.
  • Roger Shuy at Lingua Franca writes about the power of correspondence, of written letters, to help language learners. (I concur.)
  • At the LRB Blog, Jeremy Bernstein writes about anti-Semitism in the United States, in the 1930s and now.
  • The NYR Daily examines the life of writer, and long-time exile from her native Portugal, Maria Gabriela Llansol.
  • Haley Gray at Roads and Kingdoms reports on the life and work of Mark Maryboy, a Navajo land rights activist in Utah.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the Russian urban myth of blonde Baltic snipers from the Baltic States who had been enlisted into wars against Russia like that of Chechnya in the 1990s.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at the classic red phone booths of the United Kingdom, now almost all removed from the streets of the country and sent to a graveyard in a part of rural Yorkshire that has other claims to fame.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait considers nearby galaxy NGC 6744, a relatively nearby spiral galaxy that may look like the Milky Way.
  • D-Brief notes the remarkable ceramic spring that gives the mantis shrimp its remarkably powerful punch.
  • Far Outliers notes how the north Korean port of Hamhung was modernized in the 1930s, but also Japanized, with few legacies of its Korean past remaining.
  • Joe. My. God. notes how the Trump administration plans to define being transgender out of existence. Appalling.
  • Alexandra Samuel at JSTOR Daily notes the ways in which the Internet has undermined the traditions which support American political institutions. Can new traditions be made?
  • Lawyers, Guns, and Money notes how the Trump’s withdrawal from the INF treaty with Russia on nuclear weapons harms American security.
  • Rose Jacobs at Lingua Franca writes about ways in which derision, specifically of other nationalities, enters into English slang.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that, in an article surveying the Icelandic language, a report that sales of books in Iceland have fallen by nearly half since 2010.
  • The NYR Daily looks at two recent movies, one autobiographical and one fictional, looking at dads in space.
  • Jason Perry at the Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest imagery of the volcanoes of Io.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the possibility that time travel might not destroy the universe via paradoxes.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the experience of post-Soviet Estonia with its two Orthodox churches might be a model for Ukraine.