A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘beatles

[MUSIC] Five music links: Peter Hook, Aimee Mann, Mongolian hip-hop, Bruno Capinan, John Lennon

  • Dangerous Minds notes that Peter Hook has put his vast personal collection of music-related memorabilia up on the market.
  • Dangerous Minds notes that the Aimee Mann song “No More Crying” was inspired by her relationship with Al Jourgensen of Ministry.
  • Ozy reports on the thriving Mongolian hip-hop scene.
  • NOW Toronto notes the importance of the music of Bruno Capinan at this fraught time for Brazil.
  • Folio reports on the possibility that the lyrics for the famous John Lennon song “Imagine” were inspired by a conversation with the Cree activist Lillian Piché Shirt about her grandmother.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Architectuul looks at the divided cities of the divided island of Cyprus.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares an image of a galaxy that actually has a tail.
  • Maria Farrell at Crooked Timber talks about her pain as an immigrant in the United Kingdom in the era of Brexit, her pain being but one of many different types created by this move.
  • The Crux talks about the rejected American proposal to detonate a nuclear bomb on the Moon, and the several times the United States did arrange for lesser noteworthy events there (collisions, for the record).
  • D-Brief notes how the innovative use of Curiosity instruments has explained more about the watery past of Gale Crater.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes one astronomer’s theory that Venus tipped early into a greenhouse effect because of a surfeit of carbon relative to Earth.
  • Far Outliers looks at missionaries in China, and their Yangtze explorations, in the late 19th century.
  • Gizmodo notes evidence that Neanderthals and Denisovans cohabited in a cave for millennia.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox writes about his exploration of the solo music of Paul McCartney.
  • io9 looks at what is happening with Namor in the Marvel universe, with interesting echoes of recent Aquaman storylines.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the Beothuk of Newfoundland and their sad fate.
  • Language Hat explores Patagonian Afrikaans.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on how mindboggling it is to want to be a billionaire. What would you do with that wealth?
  • The Map Room Blog shares a visualization of the polar vortex.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the career of a writer who writes stories intended to help people fall asleep.
  • The New APPS Blog reports on the power of biometric data and the threat of its misuse.
  • Neuroskeptic takes a look at neurogenesis in human beings.
  • Out There notes the import, in understanding our solar system, of the New Horizons photos of Ultima Thule.
  • Jason Davis at the Planetary Society Blog notes that OSIRIS-REx is in orbit of Bennu and preparing to take samples.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares a list of 21 things that visitors to Kolkata should know.
  • Mark Simpson takes a critical look at the idea of toxic masculinity. Who benefits?
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why global warming is responsible for the descent of the polar vortex.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the pro-Russian Gagauz of Moldova are moving towards a break if the country at large becomes pro-Western.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the art of Finnish painter Hugo Simberg.

[URBAN NOTE] The CBC on the 50th anniversary of the final Beatles concert, in Toronto

By chance I was at the Maple Leaf Gardens this afternoon, four hours after a scheduled event commemorating the 50th anniversary. CBC’s Deana Sumanac-Johnson demonstrates why it was an event worth of commemoration.

They say that if you remember the 1960s, you weren’t really there. A similar thing could be said of the Beatles’ last concert in Canada, which took place at Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto on Aug.17, 1966: if you remember hearing the music clearly, you probably weren’t there.

Toronto Mayor John Tory was there: only 12 years old, younger sister in tow, tickets procured by their grandfather.

“The volume of the screaming was such that you could just barely hear the music,” Tory said in an interview with CBC News, recalling his excitement.

“To be in that environment was quite an experience. But if you said you went for the clarity of music, to hear every song, that would be an untruth, because you could hardly hear anything.”

Unbeknownst to Tory and other Beatles fans at the time, that very thing — the noise that drowned out the music — was one of the factors that led the Fab Four to stop touring and conclude that their musical mission was better carried out in the studio producing albums.

Their last major concert took place just 12 days after the Toronto stop. Several studio albums later, in 1970, they broke up.

And that’s why this week’s celebration of all things Beatles in Toronto is a bittersweet moment. It sheds light on the rarely explored importance of Canada and Toronto to the Beatles’ career and also serves as a reminder that the concert-goers at Maple Leaf Gardens witnessed the beginning of the end of one of rock’s greatest bands.

Written by Randy McDonald

August 17, 2016 at 11:59 pm