A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘belarus

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Anthrodendum takes a look at the way community knowledge is now being subject to a privatization.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlyn Kelly starts a discussion about what makes home.
  • Bruce Dorminey suggests a pre-Theia, Moon-sized impactor gave the Earth its metal crust.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at the current state of knowledge about Proxima b.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Russia is apparently testing advanced nuclear weapons.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers the religious impulse in so many technophiles’ view of the world.
  • Language Hat considers the dynamics associated with learning minority languages in Europe.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares a classic traffic safety clip from 1913.
  • The LRB Blog mourns the loss of Glen Newey, long-time contributor.
  • Lovesick Cyborg notes a NASA study into the economics of a viable space-based solar power project.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look at the a├žorda of Portugal, a bread-based broth that was a long-time food of the poor.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands celebrates the passage of summer into fall through photos of her vegetable garden.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the representation of LGBTQ people on television, and sees much reason for cheer.
  • Science Sushi notes that different dolphin groups seem to have different dialects.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at Robert Merton’s refinement of social functionalism.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that many ethnic Russians in Belarus, as in Ukraine, have shifted identity to that of the titular nation.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes one mistake made about artificial intelligence: it is not automatically more accurate.
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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of dispatching a fleet of sail-equipped probes to map the asteroid belt.
  • Crux considers the importance of the invention of zero for mathematics.
  • D-Brief notes that Scotland’s oldest snow patch is set to melt imminently.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at the stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters.
  • Imageo notes the modest recovery of icecaps in the Arctic this summer.
  • Language Log notes the importance of Kazakhstan’s shift to using the Latin script for the Kazakh language.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a writer’s visit to Helsinki.
  • The Map Room Blog notes a giant relief map of Guatemala, built to reinforce claims to what is now Belize.
  • The NYR Daily considers the continued salience of race in the fragile liberal-democratic world, in America and Europe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if the heavy-handed Spanish government is trying to trigger Catalonian independence.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the palm wine of Senegal, and its vendors.
  • Understanding Society considers the Holocaust, as an experience sociological and otherwise.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a libertarian case for open borders.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi celebrates his meeting mutual fan Alison Moyet.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus’ cautious Belarusianization is met by Russia’s pro-Soviet nostalgia.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining a potential relationship between stars’ magnetic fields and exoplanets.
  • Hornet Stories links to the Instagram account of Tom Bianchi, still taking photos of Fire Island.
  • Language Hat notes the death of Ognen Cemerski, a Macedonian who went to heroic lengths to translate Moby Dick into his language.
  • Language Log notes an unusual hybrid Sino-Tibetan sign for a restaurant.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is appropriately savage with Hillbilly Elegy (at least of uncritical readings of said).
  • Marginal Revolutions links to a paper noting French cities, unlike British ones, are much more tightly tied to old Roman settlements, away from the sea.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw calls for the return of the Australian $2 bill.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the aftermath of rampant electoral fraud in Angola. What will come next?
  • Drew Rowsome takes a stand against, particularly in the context of Stephen King’s It, the now-common fear of clowns.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at Erik Olin Wright’s thinking on possible utopias.
  • Window on Eurasia notes potential contributions of Russophone Belarusians and Ukrainians to the Russophone world, and notes some controversy in Moscow re: widely-observed Muslim holidays at start of the school year.

[NEWS] Six links: Cities and Burning Man, urban China, gentrification, Belarus, Algeria, refugees

  • Wired features an article talking about what Burning Man, and Black Rock City, teaches us about how cities work.
  • At The New Republic, Colin Kinniburgh talks about some strategies to fight gentrification, some potentially useful and others not.
  • Bloomberg View observes that China’s Pearl River Delta–briefly, most of urban Guangzhou from Hong Kong up–is set to have a huge property boom.
  • Bloomberg describes how Algeria, hostile to taking on debt, is going through a period of deep austerity.
  • Open Democracy looks at how the Belarusian language, despite improvements, is shut out of the country’s education system.
  • This Toronto Star article describing the detritus left by refugees fleeing New York just before they get to Canada is very sad.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the pleasures of the unmediated life, experienced in her recent vacation.
  • This celebration at Centauri Dreams of the forty years of science from the Voyager missions is heart-warming.
  • White racism in power is touched upon at Lawyers, Guns and Money.
  • Noel Maurer notes that the Philippines, where indiscriminate violence is state policy, no longer counts as a true democracy. Duturte as Marcos?
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a map depicting the frequency with which young adults live with parents across Europe. Northwestern Europe stands out.
  • Understanding Society looks at an early critique of positivism in sociology.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Belarus’ preparation for the Zapad 2017 military exercises with Russia.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Citizen Science Blog notes an effort to undertake a census of the monarch butterfly this week.
  • Crooked Timber’s Eric Rauchway riffs on Nolan’s Dunkirk as a meditation on the end of empire.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that, though a good idea science-wise, interstellar probes are not coming anytime soon.
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog shares 13 lessons to be taken from 13 Reasons Why.
  • Language Hat investigates the deeper etymology of “Lozi”, a people of Zambia.
  • Victor Mair of Language Log takes a critical look at the difficulty of learning Chinese characters.
  • Turning to the taxi industry, Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the extent to which the gig economy undermines immigrant and minority participation in established industries.
  • The LRB Blog wonders what Brexiteers could possibly have, rightly, against the European Court of Justice. Law matters …
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer is disconcerted by the extent to which some people believe falsehoods about crime and race in the US.
  • Transit Toronto notes last night’s Underground Freedom Train Ride. I’m sad I missed this.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Belarus’ concern over the import of upcoming joint military exercises with Russia, here and here.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait talks about some new observations of the dusty ring of Fomalhaut.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new theory about the magnetic fields of Uranus.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on a new Lin-Manuel Miranda mixtape referencing immigration, including the refugee crisis.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the terrible psychological toll of Grenfell Tower for the survivors, including the very young.
  • Neuroskeptic wonders if psychology papers might give criminals ideas.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy reports on a Canadian court ruling ordering Google to remove search results worldwide.
  • Window on Eurasia argues Russia must take care not to undermine protection for non-Russian languages in the republics, and describes a new total mobilization policy in Belarus possibly aimed against Russia.