A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘berbers

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul features a photo essay made by Evan Panagopoulos in the course of a hurried three-hour visit to the Socialist Modernist and modern highlights of 20th century Kiev architecture.
  • Bad Astrronomer Phil Plait notes how the latest planet found in the Kepler-47 circumbinary system evokes Tatooine.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at tide and radiation, and their impacts on potential habitability, in the TRAPPIST-1 system.
  • Citizen Science Salon looks at how the TV show Cyberchase can help get young people interested in science and math.
  • Crooked Timber mourns historian David Brion Davis.
  • The Crux looks at how the HMS Challenger pioneered the study of the deeps of the oceans, with that ship’s survey of the Mariana Trench.
  • D-Brief looks at how a snowball chamber using supercooled water can be used to hunt for dark matter.
  • Earther shares photos of the heartbreaking and artificial devastation of the Amazonian rainforest of Brazil.
  • Gizmodo shares a beautiful Hubble photograph of the southern Crab Nebula.
  • Information is Beautiful shares a reworked version of the Julia Galef illustration of the San Francisco area meme space.
  • io9 notes that, fresh from being Thor, Jane Foster is set to become a Valkyrie in a new comic.
  • JSTOR Daily explains the Victorian fondness for leeches, in medicine and in popular culture.
  • Language Hat links to an interview with linguist Amina Mettouchi, a specialist in Berber languages.
  • Language Log shares the report of a one-time Jewish refugee on changing language use in Shanghai, in the 1940s and now.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the horror of self-appointed militias capturing supposed undocumented migrants in the southwestern US.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the circumstances in which volunteer militaries can outperform conscript militaries.
  • At the NYR Daily, Christopher Benfey reports on the surprisingly intense connection between bees and mourning.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw, responding to Israel Folau, considers free expression and employment.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares a guest post from Barney Magrath on the surprisingly cheap adaptations needed to make an iPhone suitable for astrophotography.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on the hotly-contested PEI provincial election of 1966.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains what the discovery of helium hydride actually means.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little praises the Jill Lepore US history These Truths for its comprehensiveness.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the growing divergences in demographics between different post-Soviet countries.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts with another Peeps creation and moves on from there.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul profiles the construction of the Modern Berlin Temple built to a design by Mies van der Rohe in 1968.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the beauty of galaxy M61.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence that Mars sustained rivers on its surface at a surprising late date.
  • Gizmodo notes a theory that the oddly shaped ring moons of Saturn might be product of a collision.
  • Hornet Stories suggests/u> that recent raids on gay bars in New Orleans might be driven by internecine politics within the LGBTQ community.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that a court in the Cayman Islands has recently legalized same-sex marriage there.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the origins of the Chipko activists of 1960s and 1970s India, whose tree-hugging helped save forests there.
  • Language Log notes the story of Beau Jessep, who got rich off of a business creating English names for Chinese children.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money, looking at the introduction of public healthcare in Saskatchewan and wider Canada, notes the great institutional differences that do not make that a close model for public healthcare in the US now.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper examining the close relationship over time between population growth and economic and technological change.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews documentary filmmaker Nadir Bouhmouch about a Amazigh community’s resistance to an intrusive mine on their territory.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes, correctly, that one reason why Ukrainians are more prone to emigration to Europe and points beyond than Russians is that Ukraine has long been included, in whole or in part, in European states.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that we still do not know why antimatter does not dominate in our universe.
  • Understanding Society features a guest post from Indian sociologist V.K. Ramachandran talking about two visits four decades apart to one of his subjects.
  • Vintage Space makes a compelling case for people not to be afraid of nuclear rockets in space, like the vintage never-deployed NERVA.
  • Window on Eurasia takes issue with the bilingual radio programs aired in Russian republics, which subtly undermine local non-Russian languages.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts with lilacs, which include hybrids tolerant of the California climate, and goes on to explore lavender in all of its glories, queer and otherwise.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO notes Yonge Street probably beats out Davenport Road as Toronto’s oldest street.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes simulations of Earth’s early atmosphere that might help us determine if exoplanets host life.
  • Joe. My. God. notes an American Christian who thinks France deserved ISIS.
  • Language Hat notes how song lyrics help preserve the Berber dialect of Siwa, in Egypt.
  • Languages of the World’s Asya Pereltsvaig reposts an old article of hers on the English language of the islands of the South Atlantic.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the complexity of solidarity with France in our post-imperial era.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests well-timed American aid helped Greece enormously.
  • Savage Minds notes the return of the Anthrozine.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russian is now widely spoken by ISIS and looks at the exact demographics of traditional families in Russia (largely rural, largely non-Russian).

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • BlogTO highlights a new photography exhibition at Ryerson University that I really should see.
  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at the idea of subsurface biospheres on exoplanets.
  • Crooked Timber’s Belle Waring shares pictures from the ongoing protests in Ukraine and starts a debate.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes a new model of the evolutions of the Sun and the Earth’s atmosphere that suggests Earth will face a runaway greenhouse in 1.5 billion years, rather later than previously expected.
  • Far Outliers highlights the ongoing Berber awakening in north Africa.
  • Language Log tackles the Jamaican-sounding remarks of Rob Ford and finds them credible.
  • The Map Room’s Jonathan Crowe links to a wonderful New Yorker article on maps in literature.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a new paper arguing that coal power was essential for urban growth.
  • Supernova Condensate quotes Karl Popper about inductive reasoning.
  • Torontoist notes the plans for a new proposed park to be built at Ontario Place.
  • Towleroad remarks on the recent suicide of an Azerbaijani gay rights activist and notes the doubling of a bounty offered by Hong Kong billionaire to any man who would marry his lesbian–and coupled–daughter.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the new reading list for Kremlin officials.