A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘bible

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how the dinosaurs seem to have been killed off 65 million years ago by a combination of geological and astronomical catastrophes.
  • Centauri Dreams examines Kepler 1658b, a hot Jupiter in a close orbit around an old star.
  • The Crux reports on the continuing search for Planet Nine in the orbits of distant solar system objects.
  • D-Brief notes how researchers have begun to study the archaeological records of otters.
  • Cody Delistraty profiles author and journalist John Lanchester.
  • Far Outliers reports on the terrible violence between Hindus and Muslims preceding partition in Calcutta.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing suggests the carnival of the online world, full of hidden work, is actually an unsatisfying false carnival.
  • Hornet Stories reports that São Paulo LGBTQ cultural centre and homeless shelter Casa 1 is facing closure thanks to cuts by the homophobic new government.
  • io9 reports on one fan’s attempt to use machine learning to produce a HD version of Deep Space Nine.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the increasing trend, at least in the United States and the United Kingdom, to deport long-term residents lacking sufficiently secure residency rights.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the literally medieval epidemics raging among the homeless of California.
  • Marginal Revolution considers how the Book of Genesis can be read as a story of increasing technology driving improved living standards and economic growth.
  • The NYR Daily interviews Lénaïg Bredoux about #MeToo in France.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers the subtle differences in colour between ice giants Uranus and Neptune, one greenish and the other a blue, and the causes of this difference.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle shares beautiful photos of ice on a stream as he talks about his creative process.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what the universe was like back when the Earth was forming.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on a statement made by the government of Belarus that the survival of the Belarusian language is a guarantor of national security.
  • Arnold Zwicky was kind enough to share his handout for the semiotics gathering SemFest20.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul looks back at its work over 2018.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait reflects on an odd photo of the odd galaxy NGC 3981.
  • The Crux tells the story of how the moons of Jupiter, currently enumerated at 79 and including many oddly-shaped objects in odd orbits, have been found.
  • Gizmodo notes how some astronomers have begun to use the precise rotations of neutron stars to calibrate atomic clocks on Earth.
  • Keiran Healy shares a literally beautiful chart depicting mortality rates in France over two centuries.
  • Hornet Stories notes that, two years after his death, the estate of George Michael is still making donations to the singer’s favoured charities.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox celebrates the Ramones song “I Wanna Be Sedated”.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how unauthorized migrants detained by the United States are being absorbed into the captive workforces of prisons.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution approves of the Museum of the Bible, in Washington D.C., as a tourist destination.
  • The NYR Daily looks at soccer (or football) in Morocco, as a badge of identity and as a vehicle for the political discussions otherwise repressed by the Moroccan state.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the paiche, a fish that is endangered in Peru but is invasively successful in Bolivia.
  • Peter Rukavina makes a good point about the joys of unexpected fun.
  • The Signal reports on how the American Folklife Centre processes its audio recordings in archiving them.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel debunks some myths about black holes, notably that their gravity is any more irresistible than that of any other object of comparable mass.
  • Strange Company shares the contemporary news report from 1878 of a British man who binge-drank himself across the Atlantic to the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on a proposal in the fast-depopulating Magadan oblast of Russia to extend to all long-term residents the subsidies extended to native peoples.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on another Switzerland-like landscape, this one the shoreline around Lake Sevan in Armenia.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • James Bow talks about how Ontario aiming for experimental hydrogen-powered trains, not electric ones, is a mistake.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the community that WalMart took to a West Virginia county it is now leaving.
  • Diane Duane shows an old novel proposal from 1999 that she found again, and is now dusting off.
  • Transit Toronto notes that the time-based transfer program on the St. Clair route is ending, after 12 years.
  • Unicorn Booty reports on the lavender scare of the 1950s in the United States.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the strong use of repetition, as a literary device, in the Hebrew version particularly of Genesis.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders how the Russian-American relationship, one Russia has depended on in the past, will evolve.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly photoblogs about her trip to Berlin.
  • Dead Things reports on a recent study that unraveled the evolutionary history of the domestic cat.
  • James Nicoll notes that his niece and nephew will each be performing theatre in Toronto.
  • Language Hat has an interesting link to interviews of coders as if they were translators.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at Chinese video game competitions and Chinese tours to Soviet revolutionary sites.
  • Steve Munro shares photos of the old Kitchener trolleybus.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares the story of the Ramadan drummer of Coney Island.
  • Savage Minds shares an essay arguing that photographed subjects should provide they consent and receive renumeration.
  • Torontoist shares photos of the Trans March.
  • Towleroad notes the cancellation of anti-gay convictions of Nazis.
  • Van Waffle shows the stories of the caterpillars in his backyard.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy hosts an essay talking about the difficulties of translating the Book of Genesis.