A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘bikes

[URBAN NOTE] Four transit notes: King Street, bike lanes, Toronto Islands ferries, Coach Terminal

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  • Transit Toronto reports on how King, from Bathurst through to Jarvis, has been made a street where transit–streetcars, particularly–has priority.
  • CBC notes that, by the standards of other peers, Toronto lags behind in the implementation of bike lanes.
  • The venerable old ferries which link Toronto to the Toronto Islands are set to be retired. Farewell, noble boats. CBC reports.
  • I quite like the idea of seeking out plans to make the Toronto Coach Terminal new again. It might be overlooked these days, but it does have lovely bones. The Toronto Star reports.
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[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto notes: transit fares, Scarborough subway, Bloor bikes, alt-right, Junction

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  • blogTO notes that some would like a single fare for transit in Toronto.
  • News of the internal Metrolinx report concluding a one-stop Scarborough subway extension would not be viable should not be controversial. But then, that’s Toronto transit. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Chris Selley hopes that the approval of permanent bike lanes along Bloor means that the cyclist/driver war will come to an end, over at the National Post.
  • Torontoist reports on the identities of some of the white supremacists putting up alt-right posters around Toronto, with photos.
  • Toronto Life notes that someone in the Junction has put up an unfinished basement apartment for $500 a month. (The tenant would be expected to finish the job.)

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links, from rising CityPlace, to queer issues, to Tibetan food in Parkdale

  • In The Globe and Mail, Marcus Gee looks at how the new high-rise CityPlace district, on the waterfront, is becoming a neighbourhood.
  • Steve Munro celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Spadina streetcar, here and here.
  • Justin Ling at Vice reports on the new disappearances of queer men in Toronto that have left the community on edge.
  • At the Toronto Star, Ben Spurr notes that the bike route at Bathurst and Adelaide, overcrowded, is going to be improved.
  • Aeryn Pfaff describes at Torontoist the historic and continuing important of Hanlan’s beach for the queer community of Toronto.
  • Tenzin Nawang Tekan describes the importance of the mono for Tibetans and Tibetan-Canadians, starting in Parkdale.

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links, from Rage and Rapture to lakeshore property to ESL and property

  • Liisa Ladouceur’s NOW Toronto review of the Rage and Rapture tour’s stop in Toronto get it entire. Brilliant concert.
  • Emma Teitel in the Toronto Star is quite right to note that residents of the Beach complaining about unsightly commerce are so missing the point.
  • Global News reports that mosquitos which test positive for West Nile virus have been found on the flooded Toronto Islands.
  • The Toronto Islands will reopen Monday, on the first of the month, the City of Toronto announced.
  • Canada Post promises that its drivers will stop blocking bike lanes with their vehicles.
  • Metro Toronto describes how ESL learners in west-end Toronto are learning English via their concerns with affordable housing.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at some stunning imagery of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter.
  • Inkfish notes that some jumping spiders do not just look like ants, they walk like them, too.
  • Language Log has gentle fun with the trend to develop heat maps for American English dialects.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the idea of disgust as it is made to relate to the homeless.
  • Siva Vijenthira at Spacing considers the particular importance of biking for the independence of women.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers whether or not terraforming Mars is worth it. (Yes, but it will be costly.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that China is displacing Russia, despite the latter’s efforts, as the main trade partner of smaller post-Soviet countries.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares an amusing photo of the Wonder Bears of Provincetown.

[URBAN NOTE] “How Finland Gets People Biking Through Winter”

Torontoist’s Emily Macrae looks at how the Finnish city of Oulu keeps its citizens biking during winter. As always, planning is key.

With fewer than seven hours of sunlight a day at this time of year, Oulu is an unlikely leader in winter cycling. Timo Perälä discovered that his hometown’s approach was unique while doing research into winter maintenance of cycling routes for his thesis more than 15 years ago.

Since that time, Oulu has gained an international reputation for its efforts to facilitate active transportation in the winter. Today, 27 per cent of the population are active cyclists all year long, while Perälä has become the founder and president of the Winter Cycling Federation.

So what’s the secret to ensuring that people choose to bike regardless of the weather?

First, Oulu has an enviable cycling network that extends 613 kilometers to connect a population of 200,000. For comparison, Toronto has 579.4 kilometers of on-street cycling infrastructure for a population more than 10 times as large.

Oulu’s bike lanes are the result of decades of municipal leadership. The city’s first cycling plan was developed in 1969. In an email, Perälä explains: “It was understood early that walking and cycling [have] to be treated as equal modes of transportation.”

Written by Randy McDonald

February 10, 2017 at 10:30 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Torontoist on Bikes and Belonging

Torontoist’s Taylor Moyle described a remarkable problem, Bikes and Belonging, combining cycling with photography for newcomers. How did I miss this? Spacing had more on the project in November.

Musician Beck made an impact with two turntables and a microphone, but here in Toronto a small group of bike lovers have helped make an impact in the lives of new Canadians using two wheels and a camera phone.
About 40 people gathered at city hall on Monday to look at photos taken by people who are new to Canada and new to biking in Toronto. The exhibit, titled Bikes and Belonging, is on display in the rotunda until February 3.

The exhibit features photos from people who are new to Canada and a part of CultureLink’s 2016 Bike Host program in partnership with the Toronto Centre for Active Transportation (TCAT). The participants took pictures while riding bikes given to them by Scarborough Cycles around Toronto.

The program loaned out bicycles to newcomers for the summer. Participants were set up with a mentor cyclist to show them around the city and get them comfortable with riding in Toronto’s crowded streets and beautiful ravines.

The photography aspect of the program was created by Ryerson masters student Yvonne Verlinden, and is part of her urban planning research. She came up with the idea as she was cycling: Verlinden is a proud cyclist who is constantly visiting and photographing new places and she wanted others to share in this experience.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 6, 2017 at 9:00 pm