A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘biology

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology.net notes new findings suggesting that the creation of cave art by early humans is product of the same skills that let early humans use language.
  • Davide Marchetti at Architectuul looks at some overlooked and neglected buildings in and around Rome.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait explains how Sirius was able to hide the brilliant Gaia 1 star cluster behind it.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at new procedures for streamlining the verification of new exoplanet detections.
  • Crooked Timber notes the remarkably successful and once-controversial eroticization of plant reproduction in the poems of Erasmus Darwin.
  • Dangerous Minds notes how an errant Confederate flag on a single nearly derailed the career of Otis Redding.
  • Detecting biosignatures from exoplanets, Bruce Dorminey notes, may require “fleets” of sensitive space-based telescopes.
  • Far Outliers looks at persecution of non-Shi’ite Muslims in Safavid Iran.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the history of the enslavement of Native Americans in early colonial America, something often overlooked by later generations.
  • This video shared by Language Log, featuring two Amazon Echos repeating texts to each other and showing how these iterations change over time, is oddly fascinating.
  • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, Erik Loomis is quite clear about the good sense of Will Wilkinson’s point that controversy over “illegal” immigration is actually deeply connected to an exclusivist racism that imagines Hispanics to not be Americans.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle of Higher Education, looks at the uses of the word “redemption”, particularly in the context of the Olympics.
  • The LRB Blog suggests Russiagate is becoming a matter of hysteria. I’m unconvinced, frankly.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map showing global sea level rise over the past decades.
  • Marginal Revolution makes a case for Americans to learn foreign languages on principle. As a Canadian who recently visited a decidedly Hispanic New York, I would add that Spanish, at least, is one language quite potentially useful to Americans in their own country.
  • Drew Rowsome writes about the striking photographs of Olivier Valsecchi.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, in the 2030s, gravitational wave observatories will be so sensitive that they will be able to detect black holes about to collide years in advance.
  • Towleroad lists festival highlights for New Orleans all over the year.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how recent changes to the Russian education system harming minority languages have inspired some Muslim populations to link their language to their religion.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell makes the case that Jeremy Corbyn, through his strength in the British House of Commons, is really the only potential Remainder who is in a position of power.
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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her love for New York’s famous, dynamic, Hudson River.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the amazing potential for pulsar navigation to provide almost absolutely reliable guidance across the space of at least a galaxy.
  • Far Outliers notes the massive scale of German losses in France after the Normandy invasion.
  • Hornet Stories looks at the latest on theories as to the origin of homosexuality.
  • Joe. My. God remembers Dr. Mathilde Krim, dead this week at 91, one of the early medical heroes of HIV/AIDS in New York City.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at what, exactly, is K-POP.
  • Language Log notes that, in Xinjiang, the Chinese government has opted to repress education in the Mongolian language.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that the risk of war in Korea is less than the media suggests.
  • At Chronicle’s Lingua Franca, Ben Yagoda looks at redundancy in writing styles.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the complex relationship of French publishing house Gallimard to CĂ©line and his Naziphile anti-Semitism.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the latest images of Venus from Japan’s Akatsuki probe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the apparent willingness of Trump to use a wall with Mexico–tariffs, particularly–to pay for the wall.
  • Spacing reviews a new book examining destination architecture.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what I think is a plausible concept: Could be that there are plenty of aliens out there and we are just missing them?
  • At Strange Maps, Frank Jacobs shares a map of “Tabarnia”, the region of Catalonia around Barcelona that is skeptical of Catalonian separatism and is being positioned half-seriously as another secessionist entity.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that an actively used language is hardly the only mechanism by which a separatist identity can exist.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares a stunning photo of two galaxies colliding in the eternal night and considers the implications of the Milky Way’s future encounter with Andromeda.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the latest discoveries regarding FRB 121102 and fast radio bursts generally.
  • Hornet Stories suggests that a recent ruling by the Inter American Court of Human Rights sets the stage for marriage equality across Latin America.
  • Inkfish notes that the biomass of dead squid mothers plays a major role in the environments and ecologies of seafloors.
  • JSTOR Daily suggests retirees can actually learn a lot from the lifestyles of members of the RV–recreational vehicle–community.
  • Language Hat reports on wordplay, and its translations, in the works of Homer.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the turn to anti-intellectualism among American conservatives.
  • At Lingua Franca, William Germano talks about telling numbers.
  • The LRB Blog notes the story of the English village of Imber, intentionally depopulated by the British military during the Second World War and never allowed to be restored.
  • The NYR Daily talks about a London exhibition on the art of our era of terrorism and terror.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest Juno discoveries from Jupiter.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell reports on a debate as to whether the origin of life is a more difficult question than the origin of consciousness.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the simple pleasures of an iced coffee enjoyed in the Australian Outback.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel U>considers an interesting question: is ours the only advanced civilization in the universe?
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little tackles the concept of organizational cultures.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that post-1991 immigrants from the former Soviet Union form a tenth of the Russian labour force.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait considers the real possibility that extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua may have been ejected from the system of a dying star.
  • Centauri Dreams notes new efforts to determine brown dwarf demographics.
  • Crooked Timber shares some research on the rise and fall of Keynesianism after the financial crisis.
  • Hornet Stories shares a decidedly NSFW article about gay sex in Berlin.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the surprisingly high frequency of interspecies sex in the wild.
  • Language Hat notes new efforts to promote the status of the Luxembourgish language in the grand duchy.
  • The LRB Blog notes how a chess tournament hosted in Saudi Arabia has failed badly from the PR perspective.
  • What role does the novelist have in a world where the television serial is moving in on the territory of literature? The NYR Daily considers.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reflects on John Lyons’ book Balcony over Jerusalem, the controversy over the book, and the Middle East generally.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the ominous import of the decent drone attack in Syria against Russian forces.
  • Drew Rowsome praises the 2016 play Mustard, currently playing again at the Tarragon, as a modern-day classic.
  • Spacing features a review of a fantastic-sounding book about the architecture of Las Vegas.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the impact of the very rapid rotation of pulsars about their very shape.

[NEWS] Four sci-tech links: new non-Western star names, anti-pollution bacteria, Fitbit, ‘Oumuamua

  • Universe Today notes that the IAU has just assigned new names to 86 stars, drawing from Chinese, Indian, Arabic, Mayan and Aborigine traditions. Delta Velorum is Alsephina, for instance.
  • Genetically engineered superbacteria from China may be set to consuming the waste from that country’s fashion industry. Bloomberg reports.
  • Erin Griffith at Wired notes how Fitbit is slowly edging from a fitness device to something like a medical monitor.
  • This article in The Atlantic looking at the upcoming efforts to see if extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua is a technological artifact is fascinating.

[NEWS] Four science links: Venus and Earth, Greenland shark, maple syrup, black hole J1342+0928

  • Does Venus have a much weaker magnetic field than the Earth because Venus, unlike the Earth, did not suffer a massive Moon-creating impact? Universe Today reports.
  • M.R. O’Connor tells the story of how scientists managed to figure out how amazingly long the Greenland shark can live. The New Yorker has it.
  • Climate Central notes how, thanks to global warming, maple syrup season is starting earlier every year and the heartland of production is moving ever more to the north.
  • At Wired, Joshua Sokol reports on the distant and mysteriously massive black hole J1342+0928. How did it become so incredibly massive–780 million solar masses–when the universe was less than a billion years old?

Written by Randy McDonald

December 9, 2017 at 11:59 pm

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at how stellar winds from red dwarfs complicate the habitability of planets in their circumstellar habitable zones.
  • The Crux, noting the 75th anniversary of the atomic age, notes some non-nuclear weapons achievements of this era.
  • D-Brief notes the exceptional strength of prehistoric women farmers.
  • Daily JSTOR takes a look at the instantaneity and power–frightening power, even–of celebrity culture in an era where technology gives us access to the intimate details of their lives.
  • Far Outliers notes that Pearl Buck, American author and missionary in China, actually was egalitarian and feminist.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers all those texts created in the past, of importance then and relevant even now, which have been forgotten. How can the canon be restored?
  • Imageo shares photos of the eruption of Mount Agung, in Bali.
  • Language Hat notes the intense interest of Roman Italy in all things Egyptian, including hieroglyphics. Where, exactly, was the like European interest in the cultures it colonized more recently?
  • Language Log tries to find people who can identify the source language of a particular text. It seems Turkic …
  • Lingua France talks about Robert Luis Stevenson and his opinions (and the blogger’s) about the weather of Edinburgh.
  • Lovesick Cyborg notes the seriously destabilizing potential of roboticization on human employment. To what extent can improving education systems help?
  • Tariq Ali at the LRB Blog talks about the latest religious-political crisis in Pakistan.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an article describing a Vietnamese historian’s search for cartographic proof of his country’s claims in the South China Sea.
  • The NYR Daily considers an interesting question: how, exactly, do you get an actor to act naturally for film? What strategies do filmmakers use?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes a new genetic study hinting at a much greater survival of indigenous populations–women, at least–in Argentina than was previously suspected.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes an interesting effort to try to preserve and restore the older districts of Kabul.
  • Seriously Science notes the exploration of the microbial life populating the coffee machine sludge of some inquisitive scientists.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that substantially Russian-populated northern Kazakhstan is at risk of becoming a new Russian target, especially after Nazarbayev goes.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some thoughts on people of colour and the LGBTQ rainbow flag.