A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘biology

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Architectuul looks at a new architecture project intent on the interface between land and sea.
  • Bad Astronomy reports on the impact of a meteorite with a house in Uruguay.
  • Caitlin Kelly at the Broadside Blog writes about the importance of lightening the loads of others when one can.
  • Centauri Dreams writes about how OSIRIS-REx is responding to unexpected conditions at Bennu like its relative rockiness. https://www.centauri-dreams.org/2019/03/21/working-with-the-unexpected-at-asteroid-bennu/
  • The Crux considers the remarkable versatility of ketamine, as anesthetic and anti-depressant among other things.
  • D-Brief notes a report that reveals universal patterns of app usage on cell phones by different people.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage R.E.M. performances from 1981.
  • Earther notes that temperatures in parts of Alaska have just briefly peaked at 70 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Gizmodo notes the new accurate guide for walkers provided by a new Google Maps system making use of landmarks.
  • Kieran Healy breaks down some data from the 2018 General Social Survey.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the Sylvester classic “You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real)” has been selected for preservation by the National Registry of the Library of Congress.
  • JSTOR Daily makes a case for treating the art of children not as mere scribblings but rather as art worthy of serious consideration.
  • Language Hat notes the sensitive translation by one man of the Bible into the 20th century vernacular Arabic of Egypt.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the Mueller report, what is and is not likely to be in it, and how one should react to it.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the extent to which the employment rates of women has been a driving factor in recent American economic history.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw celebrates his 13th anniversary of blogging.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Shannon Mustipher on Caribbean rum culture.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the new interactive theatre piece Amorous Playlist.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why quantum tunneling does not violate the speed of light.
  • Towleroad notes that the André Aciman sequel to Call Me By Your Name, Find Me, is scheduled for an October release.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes how the denaturalization by Italy of a man who committed terrible criminal acts sets a bad precedent for citizenship generally.
  • Window on Eurasia lists five tactics that non-Russian republics in Russia could adopt to resist their abolition.
  • Arnold Zwicky begins a meditation that starts with the sight of a vegetarian reuben sandwich.

[NEWS] Five D-Brief links: brains and marrow, dinosaurs, PSR J0002+6216, Teacup Galaxy, Anatolia

  • D-Brief notes a theory that human brains grew so large fueled by a diet of bone marrow.
  • Alligators provide scientists with invaluable models of how dinosaurs heard sound. D-Brief reports.
  • D-Brief examines pulsar PSR J0002+6216, a body ejected from its prior orbit so violently by its formative supernova that it is now escaping the Milky Way Galaxy.
  • D-Brief notes the remarkable glow emanating from the quasar in the Teacup Galaxy 1.1 billion light-years away.
  • D-Brief notes genetic evidence suggesting that Anatolian hunter-gatherers, far from being replaced by migrants, adopted agriculture on their own.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers the possibility of life not based on DNA as we know it.
  • D-Brief considers the possibility that the formation of stratocumulus clouds might be halted by climate change.
  • Karen Sternheimer writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about the negative health effects of the stresses imposed by racists.
  • Far Outliers notes the mix of migrants in the population of Calcutta.
  • Hornet Stories notes that the Brazilian government is preparing to revoke marriage equality.
  • Erin Blakemore writes at JSTOR Daily about the gloriously messy complexity of Jane Eyre.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the growing anti-government protests in Algeria.
  • The NYR Daily notes the response of Auden to an anthology’s no-platforming of the poems of Ezra Pound.
  • pollotenchegg reports on Soviet census data from 1990, mapping the great disparities between different parts of the Soviet Union.
  • Starts With A Bang notes the mysterious quiet of the black hole at the heart of the Whirlpool Galaxy, M51.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Russia is growing increasingly dependent on a more competent China.
  • Arnold Zwicky writes about some of his encounters, past and present, on Emerson Street in Palo Alto.

[NEWS] Five science links: ancient humans, animal minds, green Asia, generation starships, SN1987A

  • Quanta Magazine notes that the deep learning offered by new artificial intelligences can help pick out traces of non-homo sapiens ancestry in our current gene pool.
  • This sensitive article in The Atlantic examines the extent to which consciousness and emotion are ubiquitous in the world of animals.
  • NASA notes evidence of the great greening of China and India, associated not only with agriculture in both countries but with the commitment of China to reforestation projects.
  • Mashable examines the fundamental brittleness of closed systems that will likely limit the classical generation starship.
  • SciTechDaily notes new observations of SN 1987A revealing a much greater prediction of dust than previously believed.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • The Big Picture shares some of the Boston Globe’s most noteworthy photos from January.
  • Centauri Dreams hosts Larry Klaes’ review of the 1972 sci-fi film Silent Running.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on a 1988 documentary of a spontaneous street Superbowl party, Show Us Your Belly.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that the dependence of pandas on bamboo as a major foodstuff is actually recent, perhaps a consequence of a recent contraction in the territory of the panda.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on one NASA scientist’s examination of what we need to do to progress more rapidly in space travel.
  • Gizmodo notes that the Parker Solar Probe is heading for another close rendezvous with the Sun.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how, in cities, environments like gardens and hotel patios can be used to provide shelter for bees.
  • Language Hat looks at some of the unusual names given by Puritan parents to their children in 17th century England.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how, in its ongoing state of emergency, France is repressing peaceful protest.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how climate zones are shifting as the world climate changes.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how population growth is so much more rapid in the modern developing world than in 19th century Europe, simply because of the lower mortality rates of our era.
  • Rocky Planet looks at primordial bodies in our solar system, like asteroids and Kuiper belt objects.
  • Mark Simpson looks at how a 1970s BBC comedy show, It Ain’t Half Hot, Mum, played with norms of sexuality and gender.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the potentially revolutionary implications if dark energy turns out to not be a constant.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, if nuclear weapons were not involved, Japan could win a naval war with Russia over the Kurils.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Architectuul looks at the divided cities of the divided island of Cyprus.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares an image of a galaxy that actually has a tail.
  • Maria Farrell at Crooked Timber talks about her pain as an immigrant in the United Kingdom in the era of Brexit, her pain being but one of many different types created by this move.
  • The Crux talks about the rejected American proposal to detonate a nuclear bomb on the Moon, and the several times the United States did arrange for lesser noteworthy events there (collisions, for the record).
  • D-Brief notes how the innovative use of Curiosity instruments has explained more about the watery past of Gale Crater.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes one astronomer’s theory that Venus tipped early into a greenhouse effect because of a surfeit of carbon relative to Earth.
  • Far Outliers looks at missionaries in China, and their Yangtze explorations, in the late 19th century.
  • Gizmodo notes evidence that Neanderthals and Denisovans cohabited in a cave for millennia.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox writes about his exploration of the solo music of Paul McCartney.
  • io9 looks at what is happening with Namor in the Marvel universe, with interesting echoes of recent Aquaman storylines.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the Beothuk of Newfoundland and their sad fate.
  • Language Hat explores Patagonian Afrikaans.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on how mindboggling it is to want to be a billionaire. What would you do with that wealth?
  • The Map Room Blog shares a visualization of the polar vortex.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the career of a writer who writes stories intended to help people fall asleep.
  • The New APPS Blog reports on the power of biometric data and the threat of its misuse.
  • Neuroskeptic takes a look at neurogenesis in human beings.
  • Out There notes the import, in understanding our solar system, of the New Horizons photos of Ultima Thule.
  • Jason Davis at the Planetary Society Blog notes that OSIRIS-REx is in orbit of Bennu and preparing to take samples.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares a list of 21 things that visitors to Kolkata should know.
  • Mark Simpson takes a critical look at the idea of toxic masculinity. Who benefits?
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why global warming is responsible for the descent of the polar vortex.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the pro-Russian Gagauz of Moldova are moving towards a break if the country at large becomes pro-Western.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the art of Finnish painter Hugo Simberg.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers the possible roles and threats posed by artificial intelligence for interstellar missions.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber makes the point that blaming Facebook for the propagation of fake news misses entirely the motives of the people who spread these rumours, online or otherwise.
  • The Crux looks at the factors which led to the human species’ diversity of skin colours.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on a new collection of early North American electronica.
  • Far Outliers reports on the salt extraction industry of Sichuan.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how inbreeding can be a threat to endangered populations, like gorillas.
  • Language Log examines the connection of the Thai word for soul with Old Sinitic.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at divisions on the American left, including pro-Trump left radicals.
  • Caitlin Chandler at the NYR Daily reports on the plight of undocumented immigrants in Rome, forced from their squats under the pressure of the new populist government of Italy.
  • Spacing takes a look at the work of Acton Ostry Architects.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the ten largest non-planetary bodies in the solar system.
  • Strange Company looks at the very strange 1997 disappearance of Judy Smith from Philadelphia and her latest discovery in the North Carolina wilderness. What happened to her?
  • Strange Maps looks at the worrisome polarization globally between supporters and opponents of the current government in Venezuela. Is this a 1914 moment?
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Russia and Venezuela share a common oil-fueled authoritarian fragility.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the camelids of Peru, stuffed toys and llamas and more.