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Posts Tagged ‘blogs

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer reports on Kepler-90, now known to have eight planets.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a model suggesting low-mass worlds like Mars do not stay very habitable for long at all around red dwarf stars.
  • Citizen Science Salon notes how Puerto Ricans are monitoring water quality on their own after Hurricane Maria.
  • The Crux notes how climate change played a role in the fall of Rome. We know more about our environment than the Romans did, but we are not much less vulnerable.
  • D-Brief notes a feature film that has just been made about Ötzi, the man who body was famously found frozen in the Tyrolean Alps five thousand years ago.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how a postage stamp featuring an erupting volcano may have kept Nicaragua from hosting an inter-oceanic canal of its own.
  • Hornet Stories reports on some exciting queer musicians.
  • Language Hat links to an online dictionary of French slang from the 19th century.
  • Language Hat has a post dealing with some controversy created on its author’s perspective on “they” as a singular pronoun. (Language changes, that’s all I have to say on that.)
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes a pretty wrong-headed take from a right-wing news source on sexuality and dating and flirting. Gack.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how the recent Kepler-90 press release shows how Kepler has reached the limit of the exoplanet science it can do. We need to put better technology at work.
  • At Whatever, John Scalzi has some interesting non-spoiler thoughts about the direction of The Last Jedi. I must see this, soon.
  • Window on Eurasia features a blithe dismissal by Putin of the idea that there is language or ethnic conflict at work. Tatars just need to learn Russian, apparently, though they can also keep Tatar as an extra.
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[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Architetuul considers the architectural potential offered by temporary constructions.
  • Centauri Dreams examines how the latest artificial intelligence routines were used to pick up the faint signal of Kepler-90i.
  • JSTOR Daily examines the sign language used by the deaf servants popular at the Ottoman imperial court.
  • Gizmodo notes that preliminary studies of ‘Oumuamua suggest that body is not a technological artifact.
  • Hornet Stories notes the bizarre friendship of Floyd Mayweather with Chechnya’s Ramzan Kadyrov.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the negative effects of NAFTA and globalization on the food eaten by Mexicans.
  • Geoffrey Pullum at Lingua Franca notes the fine line between dialectal differences and language errors.
  • The LRB Blog takes a quick look at corruption in the Russian bid for the World Cup in 2018.
  • The NYR Daily looks at Russian influence behind the Brexit referendum, noting the long-term need of the American and British democracies to adapt.
  • Jake Shears talks with Towleroad about the role that the city of New Orleans has been playing in his life and his creative work.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares beautiful images of nebula Sharpless 2-29, brilliant and beautiful from the heart of our galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how New Horizons is maneuvering for its rendezvous with KBO MU69 on 1 January 2019.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how Indian schools were at once vehicles for the assimilation of American indigenous peoples and also sites for potential resistance.
  • Dangerous Minds shares the vintage Vampirella art of Enrique Torres-Prat.
  • From Tumblr, Explain It Like I’m Not From Lawrence looks at a very unusual tower in the downtown of that Kansas community.
  • Hornet Stories notes that PrEP is becoming available in Brazil, but only for a small subset of potential users.
  • Imageo notes a recent American study observing that the degree of Arctic heating is in at least two millennia.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Bermuda has repealed marriage equality. I can’t help but think this will not help the island’s tourism.
  • Language Hat links to a new encyclopedia article examining the origins of the Japanese language. I’m surprised the article suggests there are no verifiable links to Korean, Paekche aside.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money has an after-action report on the Alabama senate election. I agree with most of the conclusions–certainly it shows a need to contest every election!
  • Allan Metcalf at Lingua Franca quite likes the term “fake news” for its specific power, claiming it as his word of 2017.
  • The NYR Daily reflects on an exhibition of the powerful works of Modigliani.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on some infrared images taken by Juno of Jupiter and volcanic Io.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares 21 pieces of advice for people interested in visiting Iran as tourists.
  • Towleroad’s list of the Top 10 albums of 2017 is worth paying attention to.
  • If this Window on Eurasia report is correct and HIV seroprevalence in Russia is twice the proportion officially claimed, 1.5% of the population …

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning images, from Jupiter, of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter, and analysis.
  • Hornet Stories notes that a reboot of 1980s animation classic She-Ra is coming to Netflix.
  • io9 carries reports suggesting that the new X-Men Dark Phoenix movie is going to have plenty of good female representation. Here’s to hoping. It also notes that the seminal George Lucas short film “Electronic Labyrinth: THX 1138 4EB” is viewable for free online, but only for a short while.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that IQ score, more than education, is the single biggest factor explaining why a person might become an inventor.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the alliance rightfully called “unholy” between religious militants and the military in Pakistan.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer explains how the strong social networks of Italian migrants in Argentina a century ago helped them eventually do better than native-born Argentines (and Spanish immigrants, too).
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes the simple joys of pupusas, Salvadoran tortillas, on a rainy day in Vancouver.
  • Towleroad reports on interesting research suggesting that gay men are more likely to have older brothers, even suggesting a possible biological mechanism for this.
  • Window on Eurasia notes reports of fights between Russian and Muslim students at Russian centres of higher education.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait answers the question of why asteroids tend to explode high in atmosphere.
  • Centauri Dreams carries Keith Cooper’s suggestion that METI activists should wait until the first generation of detailed exoplanet investigations give an idea as to what is out there before they begin transmitting.
  • The Crux notes how indigenous peoples in Guyana use drones to defend their land claims.
  • JSTOR Daily summarizes an article on the sexually radical and politically progressive Kansas freethinkers, subject even to death threats.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers the question of who benefits from automotion in early 21st century society.
  • Far Outliers notes how, in the Second World War, American missionaries also became interrogators thanks to their knowledge.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas, linking to an article on #elsagate, notes how many video creators were making content not for human audiences but rather to please YouTube algorithms.
  • Language Log deals with one manifestation of the controversy over the use of “they” as a gender-neutral first-person singular pronoun.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the terribly suspicious denial of anti-Semitism from Roy Moore’s wife. Alabamans, vote against this man.
  • The LRB Blog shares Gill Partington’s examination of some modern art exhibits dealing with the mechanics of reading.
  • Russell Darnley of maximos62 examines how Human Rights Day, celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights signed on 10 December 1948, is not the only important date in international human rights history.
  • The NYR Daily notes how Donald Trump’s actions have only worsened the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful photos from a visit to England.
  • Spacing shares an article by Sean Ruthen examining the dynamic difference of the different cities of Italy, based on the author’s recent trip there.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how young massive black hole J1342+0928 poses a challenge.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the main demographic challenges for the Baltic States these days are not so much ethnic conflicts but rather population aging and emigration.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at timeless similarities between classics of homoerotic art and modern-day gay photography. NSFW, obviously.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Andrew Barton quite approves of the Helsinki Metro.
  • Anthropology.net notes the complexity of the peopling of Eurasia, over hundreds of thousands of years and with multiple human populations.
  • Daily JSTOR has an insightful take on the fiction of the free market, looking back to Peter Drucker.
  • Far Outliers notes that the role missionaries played in the development of area studies.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell takes a look at the complexities of the latest Brexit negotiations, concentrating on the DUP and Ireland.
  • At The Frailest Thing, Michael Sacasas notes the addition of a Paypal option alongside Patreon and asks for feedback.
  • Hornet Stories notes that the Gengoroh Tagame manga My Brother’s Husband is set for a television adaptation.
  • Language Log takes a look at the complexities surrounding a piece of Maoist rhetoric. Did Mao actually say that the Chinese people stood up at Tiannamen in 1949?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the rhetoric surrounding parkland in Utah. Who is it being protected for, and what do these people have to gain from the despoliation?
  • Marginal Revolution looks at a study of Switzerland suggesting that clear boundaries have helped maintain communal peace there.
  • At the NYR Daily, Tim Parks has a lovely essay exploring the importance of the translator as a sort of secondary creator.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Tatarstan, and argues post-Soviet governments there made a mistake by concentrating on parallel Tatar and Russian cultures, as opposed to propagating Tatar language and culture for all.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell suggests that, in British political life, there are two working cultures, politicians who derive authority from merit and politicians who derive authority from brilliance. Guess who fares worse?

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Anthropology net reports on the unveiling of Little Foot, a 3.6 million year old australopithecus skeleton.
  • The Big Picture unveiled remarkable photos of the ongoing wildfires in southern California.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a suggestion of Jim Benford suggesting we are not transmitting loudly enough to be picked up across interstellar distances.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of genes which appear to have some relationship to sexual orientation variation among human men.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how DNA evidence can lead to false convictions.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares some links about extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that an opposite-sex couple in Australia who promised to divorce on the advent of marriage equality have opted not to. Surprise, surprise.

  • The Map Room Blog shares some maps examining the possibility of an electoral upset in the Alabama Senate race.
  • Marginal Revolution points out the extent to which Chicago was a huge boomtown in the 19th century.
  • The NYR Daily shares the proletarian art–literally–of Chaïm Soutine.
  • Out There takes a look at how our ill treatment of gorillas bodes ill for our treatment of hypothetical less advanced aliens.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Moscow, without restrictions on urban migration, is starting to develop ethnic neighbourhoods. (I think this natural, and fundamentally a good thing, unlike the source.)
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a report of a 1971 jam session of John Lennon with Frank Zappa.