A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘books

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

leave a comment »

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the remarkably enduring supernova iPTF14hls, which seems to have attained its longevity through massive amounts of antimatter.
  • blogTO notes plans for the construction of a new public square in Chinatown, on Huron Street.
  • James Bow shares a short story of his, set in a future where everyone has a guaranteed minimum income but few have a job.
  • A poster at Crasstalk shares a nostalgic story about long-lost summers as a child in Albuquerque in the 1960s.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on Universe, a beautiful book concerned with the history of astronomical imagery.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog explores the latent and manifest functions of education for job-seekers.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel talks about the Red Terror imposed by Lenin in 1918, and its foreshadowing of the future of the Soviet Union.
  • Language Hat links to a lovely analysis of a Tang Chinese poem, “On the Frontier.”
  • Language Log notes how the name of Chinese food “congee” ultimately has origins in Dravidian languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes note of the suspicious timing of links between the Trump family and Wikileaks.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen recounts his visit to an Amazon bookstore, and what he found lacking (or found good).
  • The NYR Daily notes the continuing controversy over the bells of the church of Balangiga, in the Philippines, taken as booty in 1901 by American forces and not returned.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders why Canadian incomes and productivity have historically been 20-30% lower than those of the United States, and why incomes have lately caught up.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the simple pleasures of an egg and cracker snack in the Faroe Islands.
  • Strange Company considers the bizarre 1910 murder of Massachusetts lawyer William Lowe Rice.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes an Australian publisher that suspended publication of a book in Australia for fear of negative reaction from China.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some photos of his orchids, blooming early because of warm temperatures.
Advertisements

[BLOG] Some Monday links

leave a comment »

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly takes a look at the concept of resilience.
  • D-Brief notes the many ways in which human beings can be killed by heat waves.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a claim for the discovery of a new pulsar planet, PSR B0329+54 b, two Earth masses with an orbit three decades long.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that, in some was, online connectivity is like a drug.
  • Hornet Stories considers the plight of bisexuals in the closet.
  • Language Hat considers the origins of the family name of Hungarian Karl-Maria Kertbeny, the man who developed the term “homosexuality”, and much else besides.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the item of soap was a key component behind racism and apartheid in South Africa.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell notes a new book, The Quotable Darwin.
  • Peter Rukavina takes a look at 18 years’ worth of links on his blog. How many are still good? The answer may surprise you.
  • Understanding Society considers the insights of Tony Judt on the psychology of Europeans after the Second World War.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever considers, in Q&A format, some insights for men in the post-Weinstein era.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how boundaries in the Caucasus were not necessarily defined entirely by the Bolsheviks.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers various odd appearances of pickles in contemporary popular culture.

[CAT] Shakespeare, by some ill-organized books

leave a comment »

Shakespeare, by some ill-organized books #toronto #dovercourtvillage #shakespeare #cats #catsofinstagram #caturday #catstagram #books #bookshelf

Written by Randy McDonald

November 11, 2017 at 6:00 am

Posted in Photo, Toronto

Tagged with , , ,

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • The Crux considers the idea that lower food consumption can lead to greater longevity.
  • D-Brief notes an English field of barley grown entirely by robots.
  • Language Hat wonders if Brexit means that EU English will start to diverge from the norms of the United Kingdom.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an article taking issue with sports fans’ treatment of players.
  • The LRB Blog notes that Nicaragua has signed up to climate-change accords, leaving only the United States.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new atlas of the Irish Revolution.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that the economy of Turkey is doing surprisingly well.
  • The Planetary Society Blog takes a look at the sorts of technology needed to survive on Mars.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics, for their detection of gravitational waves.
  • Towleroad shares Mashrou’ Leila’s condemnation of Egyptian authorities for arresting people waving the rainbow flag.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes, in passing, the hard work needed to keep artificial intelligences from being racist.
  • Arnold Zwicky links to an interactive map of the bookstores of San Francisco.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Bloordale towers, St. Regis, Toronto design failures, North Market, books

  • There will be huge changes at Bloor and Dufferin, including one proposed tower a few dozen stories high. blogTO reports.
  • The St. Regis, the former Trump Tower, is set to offer very high-end luxury condos in the Financial District. The Toronto Star reports.
  • In the aftermath of a string of pedestrian deaths, Shawn Micallef notes the design failures of Toronto leading to loss of life.
  • Spacing talks about what the North Market of Toronto can learn from the historic El Born of Barcelona.
  • blogTO notes that an abortive scandal over the placement of a Little Free Library came to nothing in the end.

[PHOTO] Eleven photos of Eliot’s Bookshop, Toronto

Eliot’s Bookshop, located the intersection of Yonge and Wellesley at 584 Yonge Street. Since my first visit to Toronto in 2002, and long before then for others, Eliot’s has been a centrepiece of Toronto’s used book market, the three stories of the building being packed with used books of all kinds spilling off their shelves. How sad, then, that rising property taxes on Yonge mean that Eliot’s will have to close up shop, the owner of the building and the bookstore hoping to find a more profitable business to take over his lease.

Eliot's Bookshop (1) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (2) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (3) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (4) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (5) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Eliot's Bookshop (6) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (7) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (8) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (9) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (10) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (11) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Written by Randy McDonald

September 18, 2017 at 11:00 am

[NEWS] Four National Post links: Nootka Island, satanic panic, Iceland volcanoes, Norton anthology

  • An unethical Victoria psychologist and his vulnerable patient helped spark the Satanic panic of the 1980s.
  • There seems to be a romance to the life of the lighthouse keepers of Nootka Island.
  • The Icelanders are watching very carefully for signs of the next big volcanic eruption. (Tourists are a concern.)
  • Who can forget all the different Norton anthologies of literature? I still have mine. The National Post remembers in a brief piece.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 8, 2017 at 11:30 pm