A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘books

[NEWS] Four culture links: the Metro book fairy, Transformers, the 13th Doctor, and the alt-right

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  • CBC Montreal notes how Andrée Archambault has been leaving books on the Montréal Metro for commuters to find.
  • CBC’s Jonathan Ore notes the (perhaps surprisingly) innovative Transformers comics put out by IDW.
  • At The Conversation, Una McCormack writes about how the 13th Doctor being played by Jodie Whittaker fulfills her childhood dreams.
  • At The Globe and Mail, Russell Smith examines why the alt-right hates cultural experimentation and innovation so much.

[NEWS] Five links about queer culture, from our history to our presence today

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  • As VICE notes, it is terribly frustrating that we still have to fight to make sure others do not lie about our queer lives.
  • Julia Carpenter at the Washington Post tells of “Lisa Ben”, the Hollywood secretary who started a periodical for lesbians back in 1949.
  • VICE tells the story of how a young man from Fort McMurray became the Fringe-headlining drag star Beardoncé.
  • There is something to Jason Chen’s article at The Cut praising the idea of the GLBTQ-themed book club as a venue.
  • Brandon Taylor’s Lithub essay arguing that queer literature must represent the extremes of queer experiences moves me.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the challenges and the prospects of laser SETI.
  • Citizen Science Salon reports on a couple who have done their best to keep their bee numbers up.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Milo’s book, contrary to Milo’s claims, has performed very badly indeed in the UK, among other places.
  • Language Log features a poetic digression by Victor Mair on Chinese characters for words like “plum” and “wine.”
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that moderate Republicans in Congress might not be all that.
  • The LRB Blog considers Nice at, and after, the time of last year’s terrorist attacks.
  • Marginal Revolution features Tyler Cowen’s description of his writing processes.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews Toronto gay photographer Dylan Rosser.
  • Unicorn Booty looks back at the history of the queercore movement–gay punk, as a first approximation.
  • Vintage Space links to an article explaining why there was neither an Apollo 2 nor an Apollo 3.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests the Russian state is undermining various once-allied Russian nationalist movements.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • James Bow shares his story of how he met famed Canadian kid’s author Gordon Korman.
  • Paul Drye has sales on this month for his two books, space race WI book False Steps and his first, Passing Strangeness.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel notes two overlooked episodes of migration in Canada, of Hawaiians in British Columbia and Canadian exiles in Australia.
  • The Great Grey Bridge’s Philip Turner shared, again, his personal photo essay about his links to and love of Canada.
  • Language Hat looks at the potentially Australian slang phrase “good on you” (pronounced “good onya”, apparently).
  • Language Hat looks at claims that translation and grammar complicate the meaning of the text authorizing the handover of Hong Kong to China.
  • The LRB Blog announces that their #readeverywhere photo contest is up and running for July!
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares a gorgeous photo essay of her trip to Chania, on Crete.
  • Unicorn Booty has an interesting essay looking at the barriers to membership imposed by gay culture on newly-out members of the community.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the cost of the Russian war in Ukraine and argues that the consequences of a crash now would be worse than in 1998.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait is skeptical that the Trump-era EPA will deal well with global warming.
  • Discover’s The Crux considers the challenge of developing safer explosives for fireworkers.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering the (real) possibility of Earth-like worlds orbiting neutron stars.
  • Language Log notes an odd use of katakana in Australia.
  • The LRB Blog considers the possibly overrated import of George Osborne’s move into the newspaper business.
  • Marginal Revolution notes one observer’s suggestion that China could sustain high-speed growth much longer than Japan.
  • The NYR Daily shares Eleanor Davis’ cartoon journal of her bike trip across America.
  • Peter Rukavina does not like the odd way Prince Edward Island made its library card into a museum pass.
  • Starts with a Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the odd galaxy MACS2129-1, young yet apparently no longer star-forming.
  • Strange Company explores the strange death of 17th century New England woman Rebecca Cornell.
  • Unicorn Booty looks at how early Playgirl tried to handle, quietly, its substantially gay readership.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at one Russian proclaiming Russia needs to stop an imminent takeover by Muslims.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • blogTO looks at eleven recent Toronto-themed books, from fiction to children’s literature.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of using waste heat to detect extraterrestrial civilizations.
  • Far Outliers reports on how German East Africa substituted for foreign imports during the blockade of the First World War.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that the fall of Rome may have been due to the failure to reconquer North Africa.
  • The NYRB Daily looks at the exuberant art of Jazz Age Florence Stettheimer.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares a stunning portrait of Jupiter from the New Horizons probe.
  • Window on Eurasia considers the idea of containment in the post-Cold War world.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the British election.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • blogTO profiles Robert Burley’s lovely new photo book, An Enduring Wilderness: Toronto’s Natural Parklands.
  • Border Thinking’s Laura Agustín looks at the New Orleans sex trade in the fiction of James Lee Burke.
  • Crooked Timber argues that philosophy majors are uniquely well-suited to being good citizens.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that American conservative voters are not monocausal.
  • Steve Munro notes that the TTC can count on delivering unreliable service, thanks in part to its concentration on terminals
  • The NYRB Daily looks at the fables of Syrian writer Osama Alomar.
  • Savage Minds looks at the very serious anthropology of Bronislaw Malinowski.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi announces his upcoming participation in the Robots vs. Fairies anthology.
  • Window on Eurasia argues a Russian annexation of the Donbas would be doable only in the aftermath of a wider Russian war against Ukraine.