A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘books

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Anthropology.net shares in the debunking of the Toba catastrophe theory.
  • Architectuul features Mirena Dunu’s exploration of the architecture of the Black Sea coastal resorts of Romania, built under Communism.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the importance of sleep hygiene and of being well-rested.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the filaments of Orion, indicators of starbirth.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how solar sails and the Falcon Heavy can be used to expedite the exploration of the solar system.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of debris marking the massive flood that most recently refilled the Mediterranean on the seafloor near Malta.
  • Lucy Ferriss at Lingua Franca uses a recent sickbed experience in Paris to explore the genesis of Bemelmans’ Madeline.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money noted recently the 15th anniversary of the American invasion of Iraq, trigger of a world-historical catastrophe.
  • The LRB Blog hosts Sara Roy’s defense of UNRWA and of the definition of the Palestinians under its case as refugees.
  • The NYR Daily notes how the regnant conservative government in Israel has been limiting funding to cultural creators who dissent from the nationalist line.
  • Roads and Kingdoms uses seven food dishes to explore the history of Malta.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why, even though dark matter is likely present in our solar system, we have not detected signs of it.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society examines the field of machine learning, and notes the ways in which its basic epistemology might be flawed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the dropping of the ethnonym “Mongol” from the title of the former Buryat-Mongol autonomous republic sixty years ago still makes some Buryats unhappy.
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[NEWS] Five music links: Annie Lennox, Stevie Nicks, Solange, Kate Bush, iPod

  • Raju Mudhar and Ben Rayner share their list of the top 100 songs related to Toronto, over at the Toronto Star.
  • Charlotte Gush at VICE shares her insightful interview with Annie Lennox. I did not know that she had been recommended to become a teacher, for instance. More here.
  • Drew Rowsome engages with the new autobiography of Stevie Nicks, Gold Dust Woman.
  • Kristin Curry links to a profoundly interesting interview with Solange about her art and her identity, over at VICE.
  • I rather like this Emma Madden guide at VICE to the music of Kate Bush, guiding listeners through her various moods and themes and styles.

Written by Randy McDonald

March 15, 2018 at 11:35 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Yonge-Dundas Square, mass transit, book sales

  • Some criticism of Yonge-Dundas Square may be merited, but I think it might be a bit too harsh. What we need is more seating on the square itself. Metronews carries it.
  • Humber Bay Shores is a lovely booming neighbourhood, but it really does need much better public transit options. For starters. The Toronto Star examines the neighbourhood.
  • Steve Munro has some more questions about Metrolinx planning in the GTA.
  • The Smarttrack solution proposed by Mayor John Tory may not be popular among some people in Scarborough. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The upcoming massive book sale at the Toronto Reference Library is one I will be paying attention to. blogTO reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Yoko Ono, cars, St. Clair, York Region, First Nations, Quayside

  • At NOW Toronto, local artist Jean Yoon reviews Yoko Ono’s new conceptual work The Riverbed, currently being exhibited at the Gardiner.
  • John Rieti at CBC notes the oddness of an observation by mayor John Tory that it is rare for parents in Toronto to not own a car.
  • Transit Toronto notes the installation of beacons to guide the blind at St. Clair station.
  • Apparently York Region’s school board does not pay students’ foster families enough. CBC reports.
  • A new study suggests that First Nations people in Toronto experience above-average levels of poverty and hunger. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Developers of a huge office-dominated complex in planned for emergent Quayside are seeking funding. The Toronto Star reports.
  • blogTO has a cute little item noting how author Elan Mastai is promoting his new book using the Little Free Libraries of Toronto.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that the measured rate of the expansion of the universe depends on the method used to track this rate, and that this is a problem.
  • On Sunday, Caitlin Kelly celebrated receiving her annual cheque from Canada’s Public Lending Program, which gives authors royalties based on how often their book has been borrowed in our public libraries.
  • In The Buzz, the Toronto Public Library identified five books in its collection particularly prone to be challenged by would-be censors.
  • D-Brief suggests that, if bacteria managed to survive and adapt in the Atacama desert as it became hostile to life, like life might have done the same on Mars.
  • Far Outliers notes the crushing defeat, and extensive looting of, the MOghul empire by the Persia of Nader Shah.
  • Hornet Stories looks at the medal hauls of out Olympic athletes this year in Pyeongchang.
  • Imageo notes satellite imagery indicating that fisheries occupy four times the footprint of agriculture. Aquaculture is starting to look like a necessary idea, I think.

  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox praises Porch Fires, a new biography of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser, for its insights on Wilder and on the moment of the settlement of the American West.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how, in the 19th century after the development of anesthesia, the ability to relieve people of pain was a political controversy. Shouldn’t it be felt, wasn’t it natural?
  • Language Hat links to an article taking a look behind the scenes at the Oxford English Dictionary. How does it work? What are its challenges?
  • At Lingua Franca, Roger Shuy distinguishes between different kinds of speech events and explains why they are so important in the context of bribery trials.
  • The LRB Blog shares some advice on ethics in statecraft from the 2nd century CE Chinese writer Liu An.
  • J. Hoberman at the NYR Daily reviews an exhibit of the work of Bauhaus artist Jozef Albers at the Guggenheim.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares an anecdote of travellers drinking homemade wine in Montenegro.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews Native American drag queen and up-and-coming music star Vizin.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how star S0-2, orbiting so close to the black hole at the heart of the Milky Way Galaxy, will help prove Einsteinian relativity.
  • Vintage Space explains, for the record, how rockets can work in a vacuum. (This did baffle some people this time last century.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, on its 100th anniversary, Estonia has succeeded in integrating most of its Russophones.

[NEWS] Six links about Black Panther and Wakanda (#blackpanther, #wakanda)

  • The Counterfactual History Review takes/u> a look at the plausibility of Wakanda, as a society, and finds it holds up. (There’s something to be said about having the problems of one’s own society being indigenous, not imposed by colonizers.)
  • This article takes a look at the interest of Lesotho, a mountainous kingdom of southern Africa that was never quite fully colonized, on the idea of Wakanda.
  • What is the relationship of Wakanda to Africa and the wider black diaspora? This article makes an argument. (Spoilers.)
  • Queer representation in Wakanda is a real thing. All the more frustrating, then, if it is not quite realized.
  • The Toronto Public Library’s The Buzz points readers to more comics exploring Black Panther and Wakanda.
  • Vulture takes a look at Christopher Priest, the writer who helped make Black Panther the character he is today more than a decade ago but then disappeared.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares photos of rings around a distant galaxy’s central black hole.
  • Inspired by Finland’s Olympic team, the Toronto Public Library’s The Buzz shares some interesting books on knitting and for knitters.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the surprising news that the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies actually have the same mass. This changes everything about what was thought about the future of the Local Group. D-Brief also reports on this news.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the conversion of tobacco fields into solar farms is not just potentially life-saving but economically viable, too.
  • Language Hat rounds up links relevant to the discovery, by field linguists, of the Malaysian language of Jedek.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle of Higher Education, shares a story from Lucy Ferris of Paris of old and the bookstore Shakespeare and Company.
  • The LRB Blog notes that the privatization of military officers’ housing in the United Kingdom was another disaster.
  • Marginal Revolution considers if Los Angeles is the most right-wing major American city, and what that actually means.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that, even in the face of subsidence in Groningen around gas fields and cheap wind energy, even the Netherlands is not moving away from oil and gas.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on porn star/actor Chris Harder and his new show, Porn To Be A Star. (NSFW.)
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines the factors which distinguish a good scientific theory from a bad one.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a decent argument that the politicized pop culture fandom around supreme court judge Ruth Bader Ginsberg is not good for the future of jurisprudence.
  • John Scalzi, at Whatever, reviews the new Pixel Buds from Google.