A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘books

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul writes about the exciting possibility of using living organisms, like fungi, as custom-designed construction materials.
  • Bad Astronomy looks at first-generation stars, the first stars in the universe which exploded and scattered heavy elements into the wider universe.
  • Caitlin Kelly writes at the Broadside Blog, as an outsider and an observer, about the American fascination with guns.
  • The Toronto Public Library’s Buzz lists some top memoirs.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the vexed issue of oxygen in the oceans of Europa. There may well not be enough oxygen to sustain complex life, though perhaps life imported from Earth might be able to thrive with suitable preparation.
  • The Crux looks at the well-established practice, not only among humans but other animals, of using natural substances as medicines.
  • D-Brief looks at the NASA Dart mission, which will try to deflect the tiny moon of asteroid Didymos in an effort to test asteroid-diversion techniques.
  • io9 reports George R.R. Martin’s belief that Gandalf could beat Dumbledore. I can buy that, actually.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the local reactions to Woodstock.
  • Language Hat looks at the language in a 19th century short story by Nikolai Leskov, concerned with the difficulties of religious conversion for a people whose language does not encompass the concepts of Christianity.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money links to a book review of his examining the Marshall mission to Nationalist China after the Second World War.
  • Marginal Revolution links to survey results suggesting that, contrary to the Brexit narratives, Britons have actually been getting happier over the past two decades.
  • The NYR Daily reports on an exhibition of the universe of transgressive writer Kathy Acker in London.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the innovative new staging of the queer Canadian classic Lilies at Buddies in Bad Times.
  • Towleroad reports on the progress of Pete Buttigieg.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia and Ukraine are becoming increasingly separated by their very different approaches to their shared Soviet past.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the latest evolutions of English.

[URBAN NOTE] Five library links: libraries, Ontario, costs

Bloor/Gladstone Library, as seen from Gladstone #toronto #bloorcourt #bloorgladstonelibrary #night #bloorstreetwest #gladstoneave #lights #latergram

  • If you are a subscribing reader to the New York Review of Books, read this Sue Halpern review essay on the public library.
  • CBC Hamilton reports on how Ontario provincial cuts will hurt many libraries around Hamilton, especially rural ones.
  • Many libraries, in the area of eastern Ontario Kingston and Perth, will also suffer from the cuts. Global News reports.
  • This CBC As It Happens interview with Dayna DeBenedet, CEO of the Dryden Public Library, looks at how the cuts will hurt already underserved communities hardest.
  • Jane Gerster at Global News notes how the library funding cuts will have a much larger negative economic effect than many might think.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes a push by astronomers to enlist help for giving trans-Neptunian object 2007-OR10 a name.
  • Centauri Dreams reflects on M87*, the supermassive black hole at the heart of M87 recently imaged, with its implications for galactic habitability.
  • Crooked Timber is right to note that Kirstjen Nielsen, architect of the cruel border policies of Trump, should not be allowed to resume a normal professional life.
  • The Crux looks at the Event Horizon Telescope Project that imaged M87*.
  • D-Brief notes that one-quarter of Japanese in their 20s and 30s have remained virgins, and explains why this might be the case.
  • Far Outliers notes the process of the writing of U.S. Grant’s acclaimed memoirs.
  • Mark Graham highlights a BBC documentary, one he contributed to, asking if artificial intelligence will kill global development.
  • Gizmodo explains why the image of black hole M87* does not look exactly like the fictional one from the scientifically-grounded Interstellar.
  • Hornet Stories explains the joys of Hawai’i in fall.
  • io9 notes that the new Deep Space Nine anniversary documentary is scheduled for a one-day theatrical release. (Will it be in Toronto?)
  • JSTOR Daily makes the point that mass enfranchisement is the best way to ensure security for all.
  • Language Hat looks at the kitabs, the books written in Afrikaans using its original Arabic script kept by Cape Malays.
  • Language Log notes, with examples, some of the uses of the words “black” and “evil” in contemporary China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that having a non-octogenarian president is a good idea.
  • Marginal Revolution shares the thoughts of Samir Varma on the new technologies–better computers, faster travel, artificial life–that may change the world in the near future.
  • The NYR Daily explores the subversive fairy tales of 19th century Frenchman Édouard Laboulaye.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the sad crash of the Beresheet probe on the surface of the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome engages with the body of work of out horror writer John Saul.
  • Peter Rukavina maps out where Islanders will be voting, and the distances they will travel, in this month’s election.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel engages with the possibility that we might be alone. What next? (Myself, I think the idea of humanity as an elder race is fascinating.)
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the sort of humour that involves ambiguous adverbs.

[PHOTO] Off to Venice!

Courtesy of a remarkable gift from my friend Alex, the next five days I will spend on a remarkable trip to Venice. I can still barely believe this great kindness, this good fortune.

More to come.

Lonely Planet, Venice & the Veneto #books #travel #venice #veneto #italy #lonelyplanet #lonelyplanetvenice #tripreading

Lonely Planet, Italian Phrasebook #books #travel #venice #veneto #italy #italianlanguage #phrasebook #lonelyplanetvenice #tripreading

Salvatore Settis, If Venice Dies #books #travel #venice #veneto #italy #salvatoresettis #ifvenicedies #tripreading

More to come.

Written by Randy McDonald

March 5, 2019 at 10:00 am

Posted in Non Blog, Photo

Tagged with , , , , , ,

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links: 1918/1919, subway, homicide, raccoons, ravines, books

  • Jamie Bradburn looks at how the newspapers of Toronto in 1918 greeted the arrival of 1919.
  • CBC Toronto notes that the question of uploading the subway–indeed, the question of what that means–will take top priority in Toronto in 2019.
  • What will the homicide rate be in Toronto in 2019? The Toronto Star considers.
  • The raccoons of Toronto deserve to be celebrated. The Toronto Star looks at this.
  • Guardian Cities looks at the extent to which the unique ecologies of the Toronto ravine system are undergoing a slow-motion collapse, and considers what can be done to stop this.
  • The Toronto Public Library’s The Buzz shared the top book picks for 2018.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • D-Brief suggests that, in an era of climate change, waves of simultaneous wildfires may be the new normal in California.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares some news items looking at the history of the Precambrian Earth and of ancient life.
  • The Island Review shares some Greenland-themed poems by Elżbieta Wójcik-Leese.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how the introduced Callery pear tree has become invasive in North America.
  • Language Log considers language as a self-regulating system.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes his new magpie friend. What name should he have?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that the democracy of Mexico is in such poor shape that, even now, the democracies of Poland and Hungary despite far-right subversion are better off.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the 1993 novel The Night of the Moonbow by Thomas Tryon.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the falling fertility rates in Syria, and takes issue with one statistical claim.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that gravitational waves are affected by gravity, and looks at what this implies for physics.
  • Towleroad reports that Sarah Silverman has rethought her use of the word “gay” in her comedy routines.
  • Vintage Space notes the evidence confirming that many–most, even–Apollo astronauts had tattoos.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the boundaries of the “Russian world” continue to contract, with the status of the Russian language receding in the education and the media and the public life of neighbouring countries.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers which part of Europe Switzerland lies in. Is it central European, or western European?

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: GO Transit, rent, land transfer tax, books, Viaduct

  • Transit Toronto notes that GO Transit has introduced regular weekday train service to Niagara Falls.
  • Average monthly rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Toronto has hit $C 2260. blogTO reports.
  • Revenue from the much-needed land transfer tax that supplies City of Toronto budgets is below expectations, the Toronto Star reported.
  • NOW Toronto shares a list of the most-borrowed books from the Toronto Public Library system in 2018.
  • Spacing celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Prince Edward Viaduct, also known as the Bloor Street Viaduct, arcing across the Don River.