A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘brazil

[NEWS] Four science links: Neanderthals, oceans and computers, Brazil rainforest, water on Vesta

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  • Neanderthals, like contemporary humans, had the sort of prolonged childhoods which lend themselves to intelligence. National Geographic reports.
  • The cool chill water of oceans is starting to be used to cool data centres. VICE reports.
  • Brazil is set to embark on a substantial process to restore Amazonian rainforest. VICE reports.
  • The Dawn probe found evidence of subsurface ice on rocky asteroid-belt protoplanet Vesta. Universe Today reports.
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[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthrodendum considers what, exactly, anthropology majors can do job-wise with their degrees. Interesting ideas.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possible origins of cometary organics in deep space.
  • Hornet Stories talks of anti-immigrant Americans with immigrant ancestors who skirted relevant laws themselves, like Donald Trump.
  • Language Hat considers byssus, an exotic ancient textile and a word with a complex history.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at how the potential for disaster in Florida is worsened by poor planning.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the sad intersection of war, xenophobia, and rising rates of polio in Pakistan (and elsewhere).
  • The Map Room Blog notes an interactive map-related play still showing at the Halifax Fringe, Cartography.
  • The NYR Daily notes a high-profile corruption trial of a former government minister in Moscow.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares Paul Schenk’s story about how he interned at JPL in 1979 for the Voyager 2 flyby.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the search by a Brazilian man for caves in the south of that country.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy asks some interesting questions about the mechanics of Settlers of Catan.
  • At Whatever, John Scalzi remembers Jerry Pournelle.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia is strongly opposed to any Circassian return to their ancestral homeland.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the exobiological potential of Titamn after the detection of acrylonitrile. Cryogenic life?
  • This guest essay at Lawyers, Guns and Money on the existential problems of Brazil, with politics depending on people not institutions, is a must-read.
  • The LRB Blog considers, in the context of Brexit, what exactly might count for some as a marker of dictatorship.
  • Did the 15th century construction of the Grand Canal in China lead the Ming away from oceanic travel? Marginal Revolution speculates.
  • The NYR Daily considers</a. the disconcertingly thorough and apparently effective of Kagame's Rwanda.
  • Out There explores the reasons why the most massive planets all have the same size.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the 5th anniversary of the arrival of Curiosity on Mars.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that, with regards to Venezuela, the United States has no good options.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the febrile political mood of Kenya.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Putin is making the mistake of seeing the United States through the prism of Russia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes a proposal for British mayors to have representation at Brexit talks makes no sense.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • blogTO notes that the old HMV store in the Dufferin Mall is now a fidget spinner store. This has gone viral.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her week in Paris.
  • Centauri Dreams notes one paper examining the complex formation of the dense TRAPPIST-1 system.
  • Far Outliers reports from early 20th century Albania, about how tribal and language and ethnic identities overlap, and not.
  • Language Log notes efforts to promote Cantonese in the face of Mandarin.
  • The LRB Blog wonders if May’s electoral defeat might lead to the United Kingdom changing its Brexit trajectory.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that cars have more complex computer programming these days than fighter jets.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that the counter-cyclical Brazilian fiscal cap still makes no sense.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is edging towards an acknowledgement of its involvement in the Ukrainian war.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • blogTO looks at deserted Mirvish Village.
  • Crooked Timber reenages with the Rachel Carson and DDT myth.
  • The Crux looks at the Mandela Effect, exploring false memories.
  • Dangerous Minds makes the case for the musical genius of Bobbie Gentry.
  • From the Heart of Europe’s Nicholas Whyte recounts his visit to Albania’s bunker museum.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes Brazil’s retirement of its only aircraft carrier.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the extent and speed of events in the Trump Administration.
  • Marginal Revolution engages with a book examining France’s carving out a “cultural exception” in international trade agreements.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reports on the passing of rulership of the Australian micronation of Hutt River.
  • Peter Rukavina shares good advice for visiting museums: visit only what you can take in.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Russian Orthodox Church opposition to a certain kind of Russian civic nationality, and argues Russia is losing even its regional superpower status.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell reports on how local councils in the United Kingdom are speculating on commercial property.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the quiet power of the candle.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining horseshoe patterns in protoplanetary disks.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at the impact of human civilization on the Amazonian rain forest and looks at the negative impact of a 6th century volcanic eruption on the Maya.
  • Language Log notes that “dumpster fire” is the American Dialect Society’s word of the year for 2016.
  • Towleroad notes Kiesza’s new single.
  • Transit Toronto notes service changes for the TTC.
  • Understanding Society looks at the Black Panther movement.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell examines the irresistible force of negative campaigning.

[LINK] CBC on the Haitians stranded in Tijuana

CBC News’ Kim Brunhuber tells a heartbreaking story of Haitian migrants stranded on the US-Mexican frontier.

Every day, more Haitians arrive, famished. They’ve been on the road for three months to get here.

“We crossed Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Guatemala to come here,” says 26-year-old Joubert Alizaire.

He’s among the close to 50,000 Haitians who migrated to Brazil after the 2010 earthquake devastated parts of their country. Most of them went to work on Olympic construction. When the Olympics ended, so did the work. But the U.S. offered them a lifeline of sorts, announcing that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement would stop deporting Haitians who were in the country illegally.

That’s what prompted many Haitians like Jean-Ludger Sainnoval to begin a tortuous cross-continental journey. He says he walked much of the way, over mountains, through rivers and jungle.

“You never forget a journey like that,” Sainnoval says. “We had nothing to eat, no water, nothing to drink. We have friends that left Brazil but didn’t make it here. Some because it was too hard. Some because they died.”

Close to 5,000 Haitians managed to make it all the way to Tijuana, at the Mexico-U.S. border. But then in September the U.S. reversed the policy and said it would resume “removing” Haitian nationals, claiming that conditions in Haiti had improved. Those who feared persecution back home could apply for asylum.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 14, 2016 at 10:59 pm