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Posts Tagged ‘brazil

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares beautiful images of nebula Sharpless 2-29, brilliant and beautiful from the heart of our galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how New Horizons is maneuvering for its rendezvous with KBO MU69 on 1 January 2019.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how Indian schools were at once vehicles for the assimilation of American indigenous peoples and also sites for potential resistance.
  • Dangerous Minds shares the vintage Vampirella art of Enrique Torres-Prat.
  • From Tumblr, Explain It Like I’m Not From Lawrence looks at a very unusual tower in the downtown of that Kansas community.
  • Hornet Stories notes that PrEP is becoming available in Brazil, but only for a small subset of potential users.
  • Imageo notes a recent American study observing that the degree of Arctic heating is in at least two millennia.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Bermuda has repealed marriage equality. I can’t help but think this will not help the island’s tourism.
  • Language Hat links to a new encyclopedia article examining the origins of the Japanese language. I’m surprised the article suggests there are no verifiable links to Korean, Paekche aside.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money has an after-action report on the Alabama senate election. I agree with most of the conclusions–certainly it shows a need to contest every election!
  • Allan Metcalf at Lingua Franca quite likes the term “fake news” for its specific power, claiming it as his word of 2017.
  • The NYR Daily reflects on an exhibition of the powerful works of Modigliani.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on some infrared images taken by Juno of Jupiter and volcanic Io.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares 21 pieces of advice for people interested in visiting Iran as tourists.
  • Towleroad’s list of the Top 10 albums of 2017 is worth paying attention to.
  • If this Window on Eurasia report is correct and HIV seroprevalence in Russia is twice the proportion officially claimed, 1.5% of the population …
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[NEWS] Seven population links: Germany, climate, Brexit, overpopulation, Amazon, whales, parrots

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  • DW reports on the profound and apparently irreversible depopulation of rural areas of the former East Germany.
  • Stephen Leahy at VICE’s Motherboard notes that pronounced global cooling may be responsible for the emigration of Donald Trump’s grandfather to the United States, that he was a climate refugee.
  • Christian Odendahl at politico.eu suggests that Brexit, by encouraging skilled immigrants (and others) to leave the United Kingdom, might work to the benefit of a Germany experiencing labour shortages.
  • David Roberts at Vox talks about the many reasons why, as an environmental journalist, he does not talk about overpopulation as a problem.
  • National Geographic reports on another massacre of indigenous peoples in the Brazilian Amazon by goldminers.
  • Phys.org warns that, at the current rate of deaths, the right whales of the North Atlantic might face extinction. Gack. (Sometimes I think we deserve a visit from the whale probe.)
  • This heartbreaking story co-authored by Ted Chiang takes the Arecibo radio telescope and the Puerto Rican parrot, the iguaca, and does something terribly beautiful and sad with the confluence of the two. Go, read.

[URBAN NOTE] Five notes on changing cities: Quayside, Andy Byford, NYC, Vancouver, Brasilia

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  • Spacing shares Ken Greenberg’s take on what Sidewalk Labs could do for an evolving City of Toronto.
  • Royson James reflects on what outgoing TTC head Andy Byford has done for Toronto, almost despite itself, over in the Toronto Star.
  • Jim Dwyer’s description of the state of the New York City subway system, something Byford will have to handle, is alarming, over in The New York Times.
  • Kerry Gold shares the convincing argument of academic John Rose that Vancouver is facing not a shortage of housing but rather a shortage of affordable housing. Policies can be instituted to change this. The Globe and Mail has it.
  • The Inter Press Service reports on a massive complex built in Brasilia by construction giant Odebrecht that now, in the Brazilian crisis, has been left empty. What to do with it? More here.

[NEWS] Four science links: Neanderthals, oceans and computers, Brazil rainforest, water on Vesta

  • Neanderthals, like contemporary humans, had the sort of prolonged childhoods which lend themselves to intelligence. National Geographic reports.
  • The cool chill water of oceans is starting to be used to cool data centres. VICE reports.
  • Brazil is set to embark on a substantial process to restore Amazonian rainforest. VICE reports.
  • The Dawn probe found evidence of subsurface ice on rocky asteroid-belt protoplanet Vesta. Universe Today reports.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthrodendum considers what, exactly, anthropology majors can do job-wise with their degrees. Interesting ideas.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possible origins of cometary organics in deep space.
  • Hornet Stories talks of anti-immigrant Americans with immigrant ancestors who skirted relevant laws themselves, like Donald Trump.
  • Language Hat considers byssus, an exotic ancient textile and a word with a complex history.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at how the potential for disaster in Florida is worsened by poor planning.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the sad intersection of war, xenophobia, and rising rates of polio in Pakistan (and elsewhere).
  • The Map Room Blog notes an interactive map-related play still showing at the Halifax Fringe, Cartography.
  • The NYR Daily notes a high-profile corruption trial of a former government minister in Moscow.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares Paul Schenk’s story about how he interned at JPL in 1979 for the Voyager 2 flyby.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the search by a Brazilian man for caves in the south of that country.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy asks some interesting questions about the mechanics of Settlers of Catan.
  • At Whatever, John Scalzi remembers Jerry Pournelle.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia is strongly opposed to any Circassian return to their ancestral homeland.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the exobiological potential of Titamn after the detection of acrylonitrile. Cryogenic life?
  • This guest essay at Lawyers, Guns and Money on the existential problems of Brazil, with politics depending on people not institutions, is a must-read.
  • The LRB Blog considers, in the context of Brexit, what exactly might count for some as a marker of dictatorship.
  • Did the 15th century construction of the Grand Canal in China lead the Ming away from oceanic travel? Marginal Revolution speculates.
  • The NYR Daily considers</a. the disconcertingly thorough and apparently effective of Kagame's Rwanda.
  • Out There explores the reasons why the most massive planets all have the same size.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the 5th anniversary of the arrival of Curiosity on Mars.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that, with regards to Venezuela, the United States has no good options.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the febrile political mood of Kenya.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Putin is making the mistake of seeing the United States through the prism of Russia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes a proposal for British mayors to have representation at Brexit talks makes no sense.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • blogTO notes that the old HMV store in the Dufferin Mall is now a fidget spinner store. This has gone viral.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her week in Paris.
  • Centauri Dreams notes one paper examining the complex formation of the dense TRAPPIST-1 system.
  • Far Outliers reports from early 20th century Albania, about how tribal and language and ethnic identities overlap, and not.
  • Language Log notes efforts to promote Cantonese in the face of Mandarin.
  • The LRB Blog wonders if May’s electoral defeat might lead to the United Kingdom changing its Brexit trajectory.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that cars have more complex computer programming these days than fighter jets.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that the counter-cyclical Brazilian fiscal cap still makes no sense.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is edging towards an acknowledgement of its involvement in the Ukrainian war.