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Posts Tagged ‘brazil

[NEWS] Some Friday links

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  • Bloomberg looks at Argentina’s push for renewable energy, reports on Rosatom’s interest in developing South Africa as an entry into the African nuclear market, writes about China’s opposition to anything remotely like separatism in Hong Kong, and looks at Poland’s demand for an apology for Bill Clinton critical of the new government.
  • Bloomberg View notes the importance of honest statistics in Brazil, and calls for American arms sales to a friendly Vietnam.
  • CBC notes new Conservative support for a transgender rights bill and reports on how Ontario’s climate policy will hit Alberta’s natural gas exports.
  • Gizmodo notes Portugal has just managed to power itself entirely on renewable energy for four days.
  • The Inter Press Service describes the Middle Eastern refugee crisis.
  • The National Post looks at a proposed New York State ban on declawing cats.
  • Open Democracy reports on Norway’s EU status via a left-leaning Norwegian, looks at the life of Daniel Berrigan, and notes the emergent Saudi-Indian alliance.
  • Universe Today describes the circumstellar habitable zones of red giants.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bloomberg notes Twitter will stop counting photos and links against its 140-character limit, reports on the challenges of the new Taiwanese president, and reports on Japan’s efforts to boost its workforce.
  • Bloomberg View argues European banks just aren’t good at investment banking, suggests austerity worked for Latvia, and argues an IMF suggestion of a debt holiday for Greece is impolitic.
  • CBC notes J.K. Rowling’s defense of Donald Trump.
  • Via The Dragon’s Gaze, I found this Eurekalert post noting a search for Earth-like worlds around highly evolved stars, like the red giants that our sun will evolve into.
  • Gizmodo reports on how Sweden is moving the city of Kiruna to safer ground, and describes Amazon’s interest in opening more physical bookstores.
  • The Inter Press Service wonders what will happen to Brazil now.
  • The National Post notes the mysteries surrounding a secret American military spaceplane.
  • Open Democracy looks at the human rights consequences of Mexico’s long-running drug war.
  • TVO considers the impact of a long NDP leadership campaign on the party.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • The Big Picture shares photos of a Shanghai neighbourhood that refuses to sell out to developers.
  • James Bow rates California rail.

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the large dwarf planet 2007 OR10.
  • Dangerous Minds notes a campaign by a 9/11 conspiracy theorist to raise funds to buy an airplane and a building.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at the Kepler-223 system.
  • Language Hat looks at an astonishingly thorough German-led effort to publish a dictionary of Latin.
  • The NYRB Daily assesses the Iran nuclear deal.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers Brazil and argues that any treachery in Sykes-Picot was less in the deal and more in the assumptions behind it.
  • Transit Toronto notes the return of GO Transit’s seasonal trains to Niagara.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Moscow’s refusal to allow Circassians a memorial march.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

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  • Business Insider looks at the sad state of a project to build a Chinese bullet train in Venezuela.
  • Bloomberg notes the profound unconstitutionality of Donald Trump’s suggestion that the US national debt might be renounced, looks at the needs of the Brazilian economy, and suggests Poland’s economic nationalism is viable.
  • CBC reports that Sinéad O’Connor is safe in Chicago.
  • National Geographic shares hidden pictures of the Cultural Revolution.
  • The National Post notes the discovery of what might be the ruins of an old fort at Lunenburg.
  • Open Democracy suggests that Brexit, by separating the City of London from the European Union, could trigger the end of globalization, also taking a look at the popularity of populism.
  • Reuters notes the softening of the terms of a Chinese-Venezuelan loan arrangement.
  • The Washington Post notes the migration of some Ethiopian-Americans to a booming Ethiopia.
  • Wired looks at how natural gas will be used to move beyond the Haber-Bosch process which has created fertilizer for a century.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Charlie Stross at Antipope wonders what subtle techniques could be used to sabotage a modern technology firm.
  • Bad Astronomy notes the work that went into determining the origins of a high-energy neutrino.
  • blogTO praises the Toronto Islands.
  • Imageo shares this unsettling graphic depicting rising global temperatures over time.
  • The Map Room notes, using Amazon’s controversy over same-day delivery being coincidentally limited largely to areas with non-black populations, the problems involved with being blind about data.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen makes the case for Britain staying in the imperfect European Union.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that the new Brazilian government’s all-male cabinet required some work, given the presence of women in Brazil’s business life.
  • Transit Toronto looks at plans for new GO Station construction in the GTA.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Russian coverage of Crimean Tatar Jamala’s song “1944” and her victory for Ukraine at Eurovision.

[NEWS] Some Friday links

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  • Bloomberg notes that cutting back on immigration would not boost a post-Brexit United Kingdom’s living standards, reports on Uber’s fight with taxi companies, and observes that the new president of the Philippines vows to continue his predecessor’s economic policies.
  • Bloomberg View argues China should want a Taiwan with a higher international profile.
  • CBC notes the status of Dilma Rousseff’s impeachment and reports on the discovery of a bacterium lacking mitochondria.
  • MacLean’s interviews Poland’s president on everything from Ukraine to Second World War history wars.
  • The National Post suggests the Arabian peninsula may have been a refugium for human beings during the last Ice Age and notes an American judge’s condemnation of the Pentagon for not releasing torture photos.
  • Wired reports on a coast-to-coast road trip, in the United States in a car, circa 1903.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bloomberg notes Petrobras’ dismissal of rumours it is threatened by the impeachment, observes that many Europeans expect a chain reaction of departures if the United Kingdom leaves, notes that a return to high economic growth in Israel will require including the Palestinian minority, and
    looks at Panamanian efforts to convince the world that the country is not a tax haven.
  • The Globe and Mail remembers Mi’kMaq teacher Elsie Basque, and looks at how Mongolia is trying to adapt to the new economy.
  • Bloomberg View states the obvious, noting that an expected event is not a wild swan.
  • CBC notes Rachel Notley’s tour of Fort McMurray.
  • The Inter Press Service notes the denial of everything about the Rohingya.
  • MacLean’s looks at further confusion in Brazil.
  • Open Democracy notes a push for land reform in Paraguay and looks at the devastation of Scotland’s Labour Party.
  • Wired notes the dependence of intelligence agencies on Twitter, proved by Twitter shutting an intermediary down.
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