A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘brexit

[BLOG] Five NYR Daily links (@nyr_daily)

  • Garry Wills writes at the NYR Daily about the history of impeachment, here.
  • David Rieff writes at the NYR about Peronism and the new president, in Argentina, here.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the disaster soon to be visited by Brexit on Northern Ireland, here.
  • Matt Seaton writes at the NYR Daily about what the recent British election reveals about the failing health of social democracy in England.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the new movie Atlantics, which looks at migration and Africa.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer notes a new study explaining how climate change makes hurricanes more destructive.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a mosaic photo of the sky with Alpha Centauri highlighted.
  • The Crux shares a paper explaining why the bubonic plague rarely becomes mass epidemics like the Black Death of the 14th century.
  • D-Brief notes the new ESA satellite ARIEL, which will be capable of determining of exoplanet skies are clear or not.
  • Gizmodo consults different experts on the subject of smart drugs. Do they work?
  • JSTOR Daily explains why Native Americans are so prominent in firefighting in the US Southwest.
  • Language Log looks at evidence for the diffusion of “horse master” between speakers of ancient Indo-European and Sinitic languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the election of Chesa Boudin as San Francisco District Attorney.
  • The LRB Blog considers the apparent pact between Farage and Johnson on Brexit.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at a paper examining longer-run effects of the integration of the US military on racial lines in the Korean War.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how Big Pharma in the US is trying to deal with the opioid epidemic.
  • The Signal explains how the Library of Congress is expanding its collections of digital material.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how future generations of telescopes will be able to directly measure the expansion of the universe.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy explains why DACA, giving succor to Dreamers, is legal.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, after a century of tumult, the economy of Russia is back at the same relative ranking that it enjoyed a century ago.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on an old butch cookbook.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the mystery of distant active galaxy SDSS J163909+282447.1, with a supermassive black hole but few stars.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a proposal from Robert Buckalew for craft to engage in planned panspermia, seeding life across the galaxy.
  • The Crux looks at the theremin and the life of its creator, Leon Theremin.
  • D-Brief notes that termites cannibalize their dead, for the good of the community.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at William Burroughs’ Blade Runner, an adaptation of a 1979 science fiction novel by Alan Nourse.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new study explaining how the Milky Way Galaxy, and the rest of the Local Group, was heavily influenced by its birth environment.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at why the Chernobyl control room is now open for tourists.
  • Dale Campos at Lawyers. Guns and Money looks at the effects of inequality on support for right-wing politics.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog looks at the decay and transformation of British politics, with Keith Vaz and Brexit.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper explaining why queens are more warlike than kings.
  • Omar G. EncarnaciĆ³n at the NYR Daily looks at how Spain has made reparations to LGBTQ people for past homophobia. Why should the United States not do the same?
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There shares his interview with physicist Sean Carroll on the reality of the Many Worlds Theory. There may be endless copies of each of us out there. (Where?)
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why 5G is almost certainly safe for humans.
  • Strange Company shares a newspaper clipping reporting on a haunting in Wales’ Plas Mawr castle.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at all the different names for Africa throughout the years.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers, in the case of the disposal of eastern Oklahoma, whether federal Indian law should be textualist. (They argue against.)
  • Window on Eurasia notes the interest of the government of Ukraine in supporting Ukrainians and other minorities in Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at syntax on signs for Sloppy Joe’s.

[NEWS] Thirteen #cdnpoli links for #elxn43

  • CTV News notes that election day is here in Canada.
  • CTV News shares a list of answers to frequently asked questions about #elxn43 requirements.
  • Philippe Fournier at MacLean’s notes that #elxn43 is shaping to be perhaps the most uncertain federal election in Canada since 1979, at least.
  • Kai Cheng Thom at Daily Xtra addresses the despair of a voter wondering if they should vote at all. Even in dark times, there must be some room for hope, for creative responses.
  • Andrew Coyne at the National Post points out the obvious, that Canadians should not feel smug about dysfunction in the US and Britain.
  • Chris Selley at the National Post argues against electoral reform.
  • CBC shares stories of Syrian refugees, now citizens, voting for the first time in #elxn43.
  • The diffusion of extremist sentiments in Canada in the past few years is a real concern. NOW Toronto has it.
  • This CBC opinion suggests that expatriates from Canada, non-resident in the country, should not have a right to vote.
  • Andrew Scheer, once notable for his vocal support for Brexit, is now much quieter about the issue. CBC reports.
  • Peter Henderson at NOW Toronto argues that Ed the Sock has become the voice of a responsible conservatism.
  • The claims of Andrew Scheer that the political party that wins the most seats gets to form the government in the Canadian system are obviously wrong. Global News has it.
  • Who, exactly, forms the middle class in Canada, that demographic that Trudeau and Scheer have been claiming to address? CBC reports.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bruce Dorminey notes that NASA plans to launch a CubeSat into lunar orbit for navigational purposes.
  • Far Outliers looks at an instance of a knight seeking to avoid battle.
  • io9 looks at how Boris Johnson ludicrously compared himself to the Hulk.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how climate change helped make civil war in Syria possible.
  • Language Hat looks at a bad etymology for “province” published by a reputable source.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that the United States has had below-average economic growth since 2005. (The new average, I suppose?)
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the new Stephen King novel, The Institute.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains that, with K2-18b, we did not find water on an Earth-like exoplanet.
  • Strange Company looks at a peculiar case of alleged reincarnation from mid-20th century Canada.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, although North Caucasians marry at higher rates than the Russian average, these marriages are often not reported to officialdom.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the possible meanings, salacious and otherwise, of a “Boy Party”.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait shares images of Jupiter, imaged in infrared by ALMA.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at ocean upwelling on one class of super-habitable exoplanet.
  • D-Brief looks at how the Komodo dragon survived the threat of extinction.
  • Far Outliers reports on a mid-19th century slave raid in the Sahel.
  • Gizmodo notes that the secret US Air Force spaceplane, the X-37B, has spent two years in orbit. (Doing what?)
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the economic underpinnings of medieval convents.
  • Dave Brockington writes at Lawyers, Guns and Money about the continuing meltdown of the British political system in the era of Brexit, perhaps even of British democracy.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the impact of Brexit on the Common Travel Area.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on how Poland has tried to deter emigration by removing income taxes on young workers.
  • Carole Naggar writes at the NYR Daily about the photography of women photographers working for LIFE, sharing examples of their work.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why time has to be a dimension of the universe, alongside the three of space.
  • Frank Jacobs of Strange Maps shares NASA images of the forest fires of Amazonia.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that many Russophones of Ukraine are actually strongly opposed to Russia, contrary Russian stereotypes of language determining politics.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul takes a look at different retrofuture imaginings from the 20th century of what architecture might look like in the 21st century.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the mysteries surrounding a sudden recent eruption of Sagittarius A*.
  • Centauri Dreams considers what the James Webb Space Telescope might be able to pick up from TRAPPIST-1.
  • Henry Farrell at Crooked Timber considers Ossian’s Ride, a SF novel by Fred Hoyle imagining a progressive Ireland leapfrogging ahead of Britain, and how this scenario is being realized now.
  • D-Brief looks at what a glitch in the spin rate of the Vela pulsar reveals about these bodies.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at how Rock Hudson came to star in the SF film Seconds.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new NASA Kepler study suggesting (very) broadly Earth-like worlds might orbit as many as one in six Sun-like stars.
  • Gizmodo links</u. to a study suggesting the oddly fuzzy core of Jupiter might be a consequences of an ancient collision with a massive protoplanet.
  • Imageo notes that July broke all sorts of climate records.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the Trump administration has exempted Bibles from the new China tariffs.
  • Language Hat considers, after the space of a decade, why people might say a language is so foreign as to be Greek.
  • Robert Farley links at Lawyers, Guns and Money to an analysis of what major battle fleets around the world would have looked like in 1950 absent a Second World War.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the UK Conservative government’s turn towards repressive law-and-order measures will please Faragists.
  • The Map Room Blog shares maps indicating the scale of the American opioid crisis.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution links to one of his columns noting how two decades of nil economic growth has harmed Italy.
  • Peter Watts at his blog has a critical take on the Chinese SF movie The Wandering Earth.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how things are becoming quite bad for Kashmiris.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at how the OSIRIS-REx team is looking for sample sites on asteroid Bennu.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the evidence from our solar system’s moons that two planets can indeed stably share the same orbit.
  • Towleroad notes how a successful campaign has helped London fetish bar Backstreet survive gentrification.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some gorgeous blue and black flowers in the Gamble Garden of Palo Alto, and meditations on said.