A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘british columbia

[NEWS] Four links: post-strike education in Ontario, mummers of Newfounland, Vancouver, Mary Edelman

  • News that one-tenth of Ontario college students dropped out during the recent strike is not surprising. The National Post reports.
  • Atlas Obscura shares photos of the mummers of Newfoundland and the backstory of this cultural phenomenon.
  • Making abandoned housing in the Vancouver neighbourhood of West Point Grey into student housing sounds great to me. Global News reports.
  • This obituary for Mary Edelman, long-time Toronto resident and repairer of the typewriters of famed authors, offers insight into a fascinating literary past. The Toronto Star has it.
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[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning images, from Jupiter, of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter, and analysis.
  • Hornet Stories notes that a reboot of 1980s animation classic She-Ra is coming to Netflix.
  • io9 carries reports suggesting that the new X-Men Dark Phoenix movie is going to have plenty of good female representation. Here’s to hoping. It also notes that the seminal George Lucas short film “Electronic Labyrinth: THX 1138 4EB” is viewable for free online, but only for a short while.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that IQ score, more than education, is the single biggest factor explaining why a person might become an inventor.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the alliance rightfully called “unholy” between religious militants and the military in Pakistan.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer explains how the strong social networks of Italian migrants in Argentina a century ago helped them eventually do better than native-born Argentines (and Spanish immigrants, too).
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes the simple joys of pupusas, Salvadoran tortillas, on a rainy day in Vancouver.
  • Towleroad reports on interesting research suggesting that gay men are more likely to have older brothers, even suggesting a possible biological mechanism for this.
  • Window on Eurasia notes reports of fights between Russian and Muslim students at Russian centres of higher education.

[URBAN NOTE] Five notes: Saint John, Vancouver, Peterborough, Halifax, Point Hope

  • The mayor of Saint John, in New Brunswick, wants to attract migrants from Canada’s richer but more expensive cities. Global News reports.
  • Vancouver wants to keep old businesses in its Chinatown going, so as to keep as much of the old community as active as possible. Global News reports.
  • Peterborough’s low-income community now has a periodical, The River Magazine, to represent their issues. Global News reports.
  • Assembly of the first Arctic patrol ship in a planned program has been completed in the Halifax Shipyard. CBC reports.
  • The Alaskan community of Point Hope now finds itself, at least partly because of global warming and the interests of financiers, with all of the Internet bandwidth it could ever want. The New York Times reports.

[NEWS] Five links on cities: Vancouver, Edmonton, Portland, Hull, central and eastern Europe

  • A new housing policy in Vancouver will focus, among other things, on underused and housing in well-off neighbourhoods. Global News reports.
  • Can Edmonton’s Accidental Beach survive? Maybe, if federal regulation and the ever-shifting waters of the North Saskatchewan River permit. Global News reports.
  • Daily JSTOR links to a collection of articles explaining just how the Oregon city of Portland became a hipster mecca, here.
  • Alec Charles’ examination of the English city of Hull, a British City of Culture that is not only marginalized from mainstream Britain but at odds with the world (strongly pro-Brexit and all), is provocative. The article is here.
  • Politico.eu notes how the failure of central and eastern European cities to pick up new EU agencies after Brexit underlines, for many, their continuing marginalization in Europe.

[URBAN NOTE] Five notes on changing cities: Quayside, Andy Byford, NYC, Vancouver, Brasilia

  • Spacing shares Ken Greenberg’s take on what Sidewalk Labs could do for an evolving City of Toronto.
  • Royson James reflects on what outgoing TTC head Andy Byford has done for Toronto, almost despite itself, over in the Toronto Star.
  • Jim Dwyer’s description of the state of the New York City subway system, something Byford will have to handle, is alarming, over in The New York Times.
  • Kerry Gold shares the convincing argument of academic John Rose that Vancouver is facing not a shortage of housing but rather a shortage of affordable housing. Policies can be instituted to change this. The Globe and Mail has it.
  • The Inter Press Service reports on a massive complex built in Brasilia by construction giant Odebrecht that now, in the Brazilian crisis, has been left empty. What to do with it? More here.

[NEWS] Three links about smart animals: elephants as legal persons, cetacean footage, bonobo empathy

  • Three elephants in Connecticut are the latest animals subject to a bid by activists to grant them status as “legal persons”. The Washington Post reports.
  • Gary Chabonneau has won a court battle versus the Vancouver Aquarium to secure rights to footage he took of their captive cetaceans. CBC reports.
  • Bonobos have been proven in a recent experiment to have the capacity to be empathetic towards strangers. National Geographic reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 18, 2017 at 8:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Dangerous Minds shares some of the exotic space music of composer Pauline Anna Strom.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the effect of in-system super-Earth on asteroid impacts upon terrestrial planets.
  • Hornet Stories, for ones, notes that Cards Against Humanity has bought up a stretch along the US-Mexican border to prevent the construction of a border wall.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reminds people–sad that it has to be done–that, even in Trump outposts like Johnstown in Pennsylvania where racism has replaced reason among too many, there still are good things in this and other like communities.
  • The LRB Blog considers the plight of British-Iranian Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, whose plight in Iranian custody has been worsened by her government. What can be done for her?
  • Marginal Revolution notes how, in the early 20th century as in the early 21st century, substantial immigration to the US became politically controversial despite its benefits.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the art of Tove Jansson, beyond the Moomins.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer takes a look at the slow emergence of Canadian citizenship distinct from the British over the 20th century.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes</u. a look at the grape-crashing of the vineyards of Oliver, British Columbia.
  • Peter Rukavina describes the origin of the theme music of CBC classic show The Friendly Giant in the 18th century English folk tune “Early One Morning.”
  • Seriously Science notes that oysters can apparently hear sound.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the autonomy enjoyed by Puerto Rico was one source of inspiration for the nationalists of Tatarstan in the early 1990s.